(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Compute! Magazine Issue 142"

ICK THE BEST LAPTOP-A BASIC GUID 



lOIPUT 




m 



JULY 1992 



ICKED 
WINDOWS WORD PROCESSORS 



WORDPERrECT FOR WINDO 
WORD FOR WINDOWS 
DPERFECTFORDOS 



MULTIMEDIA! 
CUniNG-EDGE ENTERIAINMEI 
SUPER PC SOUND 
INSTANT CD-ROM LBRARY 



CHARUS GIVENS EXCLUSIVE 
LANS AT HOME 
ONUNE GETS EASIER 




s^Jjy^i^^f'^iMiiA&^iMif-Ki'^^^ 



7U86"02193""3 



I 





\^ just exploded the myth that all drawing programs are expensive, 
hard to master, and for art school graduates only. 

More than 2,600 ready-to-use clip art images make Windows Draw perfect 
for business graphics, home office projects, even presentations. 

Cut and paste images. Customize them. Or draw up your own ideas 
with a box full of smart tools and special effects. 

In no time, you'll be confidently creating great-looking logos, illustra- 
tions, charts, posters, memos, newsletters and more. 

Helpful on-screen hints keep you drawing in the right direction. 
But if you need to talk, we're here 24 hours every weekday, and most of the 
weekend. 

Best of all Windows Draw won't blow your budget. Along with being fun, 
fast and friendly, it's affordable -just $149.95 suggested retail- According 
to InJoWorld, "...a real steal." So get your copy today. And have a blast! 

MICROGRAFX* 



Visit your local software dealer or call us toll-free at 1 -800-347-371 5 for the name of a store near you. 

© 1991, MJcrografx, Inc. All rights reserved. Micrografx and (he MicTografx logo arc registered trademark-i and Windows Draw 

is a trademiirk of Micrografx. Inc. 

JULY 1992 COMPUTE 
Circle Reader Service Number 1S0 



connpuTE 



VOLUME 14, NO. 6, ISSUE 142 



JULY 1992 



FEATURES 
6 

PROGRAMMING YOUR WORD 
PROCESSOR 

By William Harrel 

Macro magic with 

WordPerfect and WinWord. 

18 

TEST LAB 

Edited by Mike Hudnall 
We test five power-packed 
Windows word processors. 

62 

GET RIGHT, GET UGHT 

By Peter Scisco 

Cfioose the right portable for 

your lifestyle and budget. 

70 

GETTING WIRED 

By Gregg Keizer 
Hook up your home office. 

92 

GET READY FOR MULTIMEDIA 

By Gregg Keizer 
Games on the cutting edge. 

COLUMNS 

4 
EDHORIAL LICENSE 

By Clifton Karnes 
COMPUTE'S readers. 

16 

READERSHIP SURVEY 

Sound off I 

34 

NEWS & NOTES 

By Jill Champion 
Top computer news. 

38 

FEEDBACK 

Answers to tough questions. 

42 

TIPS & TOOLS 

Edited by 
Richard C. Leinecker 
Tips from our readers. 

46 

POINT & CLICK 

By Clifton Karnes 

How to uninstall Windows 

programs. 




Cover photo by Pete Turner 



48 

COMPUTE/NET 

By Troy Tucker 
What's new online. 

49 

ON DISK 

By Tony Roberts 

High-productivity 

shareware. 

52 

PROGRAMMING POWER 

By Tom Campbell 
Create your own help utility. 

54 

INTRODOS 

By Tony Roberts 

Organize your hard 

drive's data. 



56 

HARDWARE CLMK 

By Mark Minasi 
New modem protocols. 

60 

SHAREPAK 

By Bruce M. Bowden 
Shareware treasures. 

128 

NEWS BITS 

By Jill Champion 
Top stories at press time, 

DEPARTMENTS 
68 

PRODUCTIVITY CHOICE 

By Peter Scisco 
Works for Windows. 



76 

PERSONAL PRODUCTIVITY 

By Rosalind Resnick 
Help from Charles Givens. 

78 

ART WORKS 

By Robert Bixby 
Grammar checkers. 

80 

DISCOVERY CHOICE 

By Clayton Walnum 
SimAnt. 

82 

PATHWAYS 

By Steven Anzovin 
Green computing. 

84 

MULTIMEDIA PC 

By David English 

Create an instant library in 

your PC. 

86 

ENTERTAINMENT CHOICE 

By Alfred C. Giovetti 

Eye of the Beholder II: The 

Legend of Darkmoon. 

90 

GAMEPUY 

By Orson Scott Card 

Lack of speed kills Windows 

in the slow lane. 

REVIEWS 
100 

Tandy 4825 SX, 

Tandy 4850 EP, 

JUMBO Tape Backup 

System, 

Magnavox Headstart 

386SX-20CD, 

ObjectVision 2.0, 

Microsoft Money, 

Monkey Island 2: 

LeChuck's Revenge, 

Practical Peripherals 

PM96D0, 

NFL, 

QuickVerse 2.0, 

Destination: Mars!, 

Sound Master II, 

and Options. 



COMPUTE (ISSN 0194-357X) is published monlhly In the United Stales and Canada by COMPUTE Publications International Ltd., 1965 Broadway. New York, NY 10023-59S5. Volume 14. 
Numljer 6 Issue 142. Copyright © 1992 by COMPUTE Publications Inlernatioral Lid. All rights resented- COMPUTE is a registered trademark □( COMPUTE Publications tnlernatbnal Ltd 
Printed in itie USA PyR. R. Donnelley & Sons fnc. and distributed worldwide (except Australia andttre UK) by Curtis Circulation Ccmpany. P.O, Ek>x9102. Pennsauken, NJ 08109 Distributed 
in Australia by The HOfwitz Group, P.O Box 306. CamfT>efay NSW 2062 Australia and in the UK by Northern and Shell Pic , PO Ek)x3fl1. Millhartjour. London E14 9TW. Second-class postage 
paid at New York, NY, and at additional mailing ofLces. POSTMASTER; Send address changes lo COMPUTE Magazine, PO, Box 3245, Hartan, lA 51537-3041 Tel, (BOO) 727 6937, Entire 
contents copyrighted- All rights reserved. Nothing may be reproduced ir whole or in part without written permission from the publisher Subscriptions: US, AFO - S19 94 one year: Canada 
and elsewhere -$25.94 one year. Single copies S2.95 in US, The pubiisher disclaims ail responsibility to return unsoiicited matter, and all rights in portons published thereof remain the sole 
property of COMPUTE f\ibiicalion5 International Ltd. Letters sent to COMPUTE or its editors becocne the property ol the magazine. Editorial offices are located at 324 W. Wendover Ave., 
Ste. 200, Greensboro. NC 27408 Tel. (919) 275-9809. 



2 COMPUTE JULY 1992 





This isn't an ad for a National Geographic Special, an action movie, the 





Discovery Channel or Nintendo. Ifs an ad for the Sound Blaster Multimedia 




Sii;io.' walk l-wok'l n. the act 
111' uri aslninaut 
in muving aboul 
in sjjacc aulsitic 
of his spaa: 

LTClft.. 




sssa 



Upgrade Kit Which turns your home computer into all of them. 



Over SIOOQ worth of goodies for less than S850. 

r 




For more information or the name 
of your nearest dealer call 

1-800-998LABS 



fe AlifK)ne MufaedQ SfMxi For Ite PC 








Easy-to-install internal CD-ROM drive. . , ,. _^ , ■, • i j. i.- r ,„• j ■ u .« , ■ j""c *^ in 

3 leading CD software tttles; including Microsoft Windows with Multimedia Extensions 1.0, 

Microsoft Bookshelf, Creative Sounds, the Selcctware System and Sherlock Holmes, Consulting Detective. 



CRE6TIVE UIBS 



OuUkle of North Ameiica, call 65773-02331 lax: 6S-7734]353. Sound Blasla is a registered trademark ol (Native Latis, Inn Windows and Bookshell its reQislmd trademarts ol Mtcrosolt Corporaliori © 1992 Creative Ubs, Inc. All ris^ls tiserved. 

All trade names rele^enced ar? ttie service martt. trademark, or registered trademarfi ot ttieir respective manulactuTer oi owner 
Circle Reader Service Kumlier 125 



EDITORIAL LICENSE 



Clifton Karnes 




The response to 

our January 1992 

survey was 

overwhelming— 

nearly twice 

as large as we've 

ever received. 



1 y favorite day of the 
,year at COMPUTE is 
ttie one wlien all of our 
readership surveys 
are tallied and I can see the fi- 
nal results. I'm fascinated by 
our readers and their prefer- 
ences. As I turn each page, I 
feel like I'm uncovering part of 
an exciting mystery. ! know 
that in the survey's pages, I'll 
discover how your tastes 
have changed over the last 
year, and if our magazine is 
meeting your needs, 

COMPUTE'S last survey, 
printed in the January 1992 is- 
sue, was one of our most suc- 
cessful yet, and I want to 
thank those of you who took 
the time to complete it and 
send it in. The response was 
overwhelming — nearly twice 
as large as we've ever re- 
ceived. Not only does this 
show that COMPUTE'S read- 
ership is an interested and ac- 
tive group, but more respons- 
es make the survey's results 
much more significant. 




I want to underscore how im- 
portant these surveys are to us 
at COMPUTE. Knowing what 
kind of equipment you have, 
what your favorite articles are, 
and what you like to read 
about gives us the data we 
need to create a magazine 
that provides you with the in- 
formation you want most. 

But these surveys are impor- 
tant for another reason, too: 
They're just plain interesting. 
If you've ever wondered how 
you fit in with COMPUTE's oth- 
er readers, here's a quick 
look at what you're like. 

The first question on the sur- 
vey relates to the type of com- 
puter you're using. Here we 
see a marked increase in 386 
ownership, from 29 percent in 
1991 to 35 percent in 1992. If 
we lool< at 286 and 386 ma- 
chines as a group, then 72 per- 
cent of you have these ad- 
vanced CPUs. It's also notewor- 
thy that the number of you us- 
ing laptops or notebooks has 
nearly doubled in the last 
year, from 5 percent in 1991 to 
more than 9 percent in 1992. 

Just two short years ago, 
CGA and EGA were the dom- 
inant graphics systems, but to- 
day, it's a different story. VGA 
has seen spectacular grovAh, 
especially in the last year, mov- 
ing from 51 percent in 1991 
to 73 percent in 1992, Of this 
73 percent, 24 percent of you 
own Super VGA systems, 

In peripherals, there are sev- 
eral growth areas. The big- 
gest increase is in mice, scur- 
rying from 71 to 82 percent. 
We also see sys-inch disk 
drives spinning from 68 to 81 
percent. Modems have in- 
creased their bandwidth from 
a healthy 58 to 64 percent. 
And sound cards have blast- 
ed from 12 percent to a whop- 
ping 21 percent. 

When it comes to printers, 
the tried-and-true dot-matrix 
is still king of the hill with 85 
percent (about 15 percent of 
you own laser printers). 



The operating system infor- 
mation we received from you 
was a bit of a surprise. In a 
very short time, MS-DOS 5.0 
has become your dominant op- 
erating system, with 61 per- 
cent. Digital Research's DP 
DOS clocks in at a respecta- 
ble 5 percent. 

Moving from operating sys- 
tems to operating environ- 
ments, Windows has been an- 
other boom area, growing 
from 14 percent in 1990 to 22 
percent in 1991 to 31 percent 
in 1992. GeoWorks comes in 
at a healthy 12 percent. In the 
next survey, we're going to 
find out how many of you are 
using IBM's new OS/2, ver- 
sion 2.0. 

Looking at your favorite col- 
umns, we see something very 
interesting. The order of pref- 
erence hasn't changed from 
last year, but the numbers are 
larger, which indicates that 
you're reading more of the mag- 
azine. For example, "Tips & 
Tools" is still the number one 
column, but the readership 
has grown Irom 62 percent 
last year to 68 percent this 
year. "Feedback," the number 
two column, was at 48 percent 
last year and has grown to 59 
percent this year. 

Looking at favonte topics, 
we see disk management 
and MS-DOS ieading the list, 
followed closely by new hard- 
ware, how to upgrade your 
PC, and word processing. 
Just as with columns, the way 
you rank these hasn't 
changed much from last 
year, but each topic shows a 
higher percentage of readers 
interested in it. 

With our readership chang- 
ing as fast as it is, we're go- 
ing to start running two sur- 
veys each year — one in Janu- 
ary and one in July. So in this 
issue of COMPUTE, you'll 
find another readership sur- 
vey and another chance to 
tel! us a little about yourselves 
and your equipment. O 



COMPUTE JULY 1992 



ADVERTISEMENT 



JOIN THE COMPUTE SEARCHSTAKES 




YOU MAY WIN THIS 

NEO GEO HOME ARCADE SYREM FROM 

SNK HOME ENIERTAINMENR 



NEO GEO is the first TRUE ARCADE system designed 
especially for the home. And SNK Home Entertainment's NEO 
GEO surpasses all the competition - delivering motion picture- 
quality graphics, real voice speech, stereo-symphonic sound, 
and characters that are as large as life! Enter the July Compute 
SearchStakes and you may win a NEO GEO Gold System and 
this great software line up including Fatal Fur/,Top Players' Golf, 
King of the f^onsters. Blue's Journey, League Sowling, 
Magician Lord and an MVS/Arcade Compatible fvlemory Card. 

IT'S GRAND TO WIN 

Every month, from now until November, you'll have the 
chance to win fabulous prizes by playing the Compute 
SearchStakes. And by solving a minimum of just two 
monthly SearchStakes, you'll be in the position to compete 
for the SearchStakes Grand Prize, to be featured in our 
upcoming December issue. 

IT'S FUN TO PLAY 

Each of the six picture disks displayed below is a portion of 
a photo or illustration taken from an ad in this issue. To 
solve the July SearchStakes, locate the ads from which 



these disks were taken and note the page number for 
each. If the ad has no page number, simply count that 
page or cover as zero. Then add up ail six page numbers. 
That is the solution to this month's SearchStakes. 

IT'S EASY TO ENTER 

Once you find the solution, you may enter the July 
SearchStakes automatically on a touch-tone phone by 
calling 1-900-454-8681. The cost for the call is $1.50 
for the first minute, $1.00 for each additional minute. 
Average call is estimated to be 2-3 minutes. Callers must 
be 18 or older or have a parent's or guardian's permission 
to place call. You may also enter by mailing your answer 
on a 3" X 5" piece of paper, along with your name, 
address, and phone number to: "July Compute 
SearchStakes," 324 West Wendover Avenue, Suite 200, 
Greensboro, N.C. 27408 by 8/31/92. For more information 
on how you may win this month's prize, valued at more 
than $1 ,500, turn to page 40, 

The NEO GEO Home Arcade System from SNK Home 
Entertainment! Enter early.. .and enter often! 







Must have 
iadventure, 
jipment 




f^^iff^ffj^ 



PRO 



ja 



UiSjKi*sk| 



iiUG 



WORD PROCESSOR 



BY WILLIAM HARREL 










AUTOMATE YOUR COMPUTER: 

HOW TO CREATE MACROS 

TO MAKE THE MOST OF WORDPERFECT 

FOR DOS. WORDPERFECT 

FOR WINDOWS. AND WORD FOR WINDOWS. 




The word programming brings to 
mind never-ending lines of confus- 
ing and unforgiving computer 
code complete with bugs and a lot 
of trial and error. Who needs it? Let the 
programmers program. Just give me 
software that does what it's supposed 
to. Sound familiar? What many users 
fail to realize is that creating program 
code for a word processor is often no 
different from performing normal func- 
tions within the software. Wouldn't you 
like to format a letter complete with mar- 
gins, date, heading, salutation, font 
style, and signature block — all with one 
keystroke? Or how about transposing 
words or paragraphs by merely press- 
ing Alt-T? You can automate these and 
other routine tasks. It's easy, once you 
understand how to use your word proc- 
essor's macro feature. 

What's a Macro? 

Put simply, a macro is a file containing 
recorded keystrokes and commands 
that your word processor can execute. 
Most word processors come with a mac- 
ro recorder built in, Turning it on re- 
quires only a couple of keystrokes or 
mouse clicks. As with a high-speed 
tape recorder, everything you do until 
you turn off the macro recorder is 
saved. You can replay the keystrokes 
anytime you want. 

Each of the three word processors 
discussed in this article — WordPerfect 
for DOS (WPDOS), WordPerfect for Win- 
dows (WPWin), and Word for Windows 
(WinWord) — handles macros a little dif- 
ferently. But the result is the same: You 
save time by automating repetitive 
tasks. 

WPDOS lets you create one-key- 
stroke-combination (Alt-letter) macros 
and one-word macros. The two Win- 
dows applications also let you assign 
macros to keystrokes, although they're 
a little more difficult. And you can 
place them on the Button Bar in 
WPWin and on the Toolbar in Win- 
Word. To learn how, see "fvlapping Men- 
us and Keyboards." 

Ten Handy Macros 

The key to recording macros is to 
know exactly what you want them to 
do before you start. Know each step. I 
go through the process once or twice 
before invoking the macro recorder. 

For practice in creating macros, 
here are ten popular, useful macros. 
Note that WPWin doesn't automatically 
assign macros to keystrokes. You 
must do that with Preferences; see 
"Mapping Menus and Keyboards." 

Insert Today's Date 

WPDOS. To start the macro recorder 
in WPDOS, press Ctri-FlO (hold down 
8 COMPUTE JULY 1992 



the Ctrl key and press F10). Name (or 
define) the macro by pressing Alt-D. At 
the Description prompt, type Insert 
date and press Enter. The recorder 
will now record your keystrokes. Enter 
the date as you normally do in 
WPDOS: Press Shift-F5: then press 2. 
The date is entered. Press Enter twice 
to put a line between the date and the 
next text you type, and then press Gtrl- 
F10 to turn off the macro recorder. 

You can now enter the date anytime 
by simply pressing Alt-D. 

WPWin. To start the macro recorder 
in WPWin, click on the fviacro menu; 
then click on Record. In the Filename 
field, type Date (WPWin automatically 
gives the file the default WCM macro ex- 
tension). In the Descriptive Name 
field, type Insert date, and then click 
on OK. WPWin is now recording key- 
strokes and commands. (While the re- 
corder is on, the mouse isn't available 
for selecting text and graphics.) Click 
on the Tools menu; then click on Date. 
Select Text from the submenu. Press En- 
ter twice to place a blank line before 
the next text you type. Now turn off the 
macro recorder by clicking on the Mac- 
ro menu and selecting Stop. 

To run this macro now, sefect Play 
from the Macro menu, find the filename 
DATE. WCM in the Play Macro dialog 
box, and double-click on it (or select it 
and click on the Play button). 

WinWord. To start the macro record- 
er in WinWord, select Record Macro 
from the Tools menu (version 2.0). 
Type Date in the Record Macro Name 
field, place the cursor in the Key field, 
and press Shift-Ctrl-Q (this assigns the 
macro to this keystroke combination). 
Type Insert date in the Description 
field and click on OK. WinWord is now 
recording your keystrokes. To enter the 
current date, select Date and Time 
from the Insert menu. Find the date for- 
mat you want and double-click on it. 
The date is inserted. Press Enter twice 
to insert a blank line, and turn off the re- 
corder by selecting Stop Recorder 
from the Tools menu. 

To run this macro now, select Mac- 
ro from the Tools menu, find the mac- 
ro Date in the Macro Name list, and dou- 
ble-click on it. 

Italicize a Word 

To record this macro, you should have 
some text on your screen. 

WPDOS. Begin by placing the cur- 
sor anywhere on the word you want to 
italicize. Start the macro recorder; 
then define the macro by pressing Alt- 
I. At the Description prompt, type Itali- 
cize a word and press Enter. The re- 
corder is on. Press Ctrl-Right Arrow to 
move the cursor to the next word. 
Press F12 to turn on Block, and then 



press Ctrl-Left Arrow. The word you 
want to italicize is highlighted. Press 
Ctrl-F8 for Font, 2 for Appearance, and 
4 for Italic. The word is italicized. 
Press Ctrl-Right Arrow to move the cur- 
sor to the next word, and then turn off 
the macro recorder (Ctrl-FlO). 

You can run this macro anytime by 
placing the cursor on a word and press- 
ing Alt-1. 

WPWin. Begin by placing the cursor 
anywhere on the word you want to ital- 
icize. Start the macro recorder; then 
type Italic in the Filename field. In the 
Descriptive Name field, type Italicize a 
word and click on OK. The recorder is 
on. Press Ctrl-Right Arrow to move the 
cursor to the next word, press F12 to 
turn on Select Mode, and then press 
Ctrl-Left Arrow. The word is highlight- 
ed. Press Ctrl-!, The word is italicized. 
Press Ctrl-Right Arrow to move the cur- 
sor to the next word, press F12 to turn 
off Select Mode, and then select Stop 
from the Macro menu to turn off the 
macro recorder. 

WinWord. Begin by placing the cur- 
sor anywhere on the word you want to 
italicize. Start the macro recorder and 
then type ItalicWord in the Record Mac- 
ro Name field. Place the cursor in the 
Key field and press the I key. In the De- 
scription field, type Italicize a word and 
then click on OK. The recorder is on, 
ready to record your keystrokes. Press 
Ctrl-Right Arrow to move the cursor to 
the next word. Press Shift-Left Arrow to 
select the word. The word is highlight- 
ed. Press Ctrl-I. The word is italicized. 
Press Right Arrow to move the cursor 
to the end of the word, and select 
Stop Recorder from the Tools menu. 

Spell Check a Word 

If you've ever typed a word and then 
wondered if it was spelled correctly, 
this macro makes checking it easy. Be- 
gin with some text on your page. 

WPDOS. Place the cursor on or di- 
rectly after the word to check. Start the 
macro recorder, and then press Alt-W 
to define the macro. Type Spell check 
a word at the Description prompt. 
Press Ctrl-F2 for Spell; then press 1 for 
Word. Remember to turn off the macro 
recorder (Ctrl-FlO). 

If the word is spelled correctly, the 
cursor will move to the next word. If it's 
incorrect, the word will be highlighted. 
Correct it as you normally would. Re- 
turn to your document by pressing the 
Esc key. 

WPWin. Place the cursor on or direct- 
ly after the word you want to check. 
Start the macro recorder, and type Spel- 
word in the Filename field. Type Spell 
check a word in the Descriptive Name 
field, and click on OK. Press Ctrl- 
Right Arrow to move the cursor to the 




Citizen's Notebook Printer. It also fits In your briefcase. 

Callahan knows that a successful business often uses teamwork to make the sale. So he goes where the customers 
are, and he makes points. His teammate is the Citizen Notebook Printer. It's an exercise in good business: 
laser-quality output, 2.5 pounds, rechargeable power. Anytime. Anyplace. -^=. /^T'T'T^'CrTVT" 

For more information call 1 -8(K)-4-PRINTERS. "^ ^^ 1 IZilLiN 



Ctrcle R«ader Service Number 166 



V 1992 C^cn Amffica CorporaDon, PN4B. TTwrmal Fuinn and 
[h>Cltii«nk)(|a>ratrK)«rTwliiDtVMQtU«nWBlchGa LTD. 



EDITING MACROS 



Why would you want to edit a macro? To 
make it do something it wasn't pro- 
grammed to do — such as run (chain) an- 
other macro, pause so that you can enter 
data from the keyboard, or run itself over 
and over (say, to embolden the firs! line of 
15,000 addresses). Another common rea- 
son is to change text in long macros, rath- 
er than rerecording them. The more you 
think about it, the more reasons there are. 

Each program's macro language is differ- 
ent (and complex). Once you've learned to 
use it, though, you'll increase your efficien- 
cy. Here's a review on how to edit macros 
in WPDOS, WPWin, and WinWord. 

WPDOS. To edit a macro in WordPer- 
fect for DOS, the macro file must already 
exist. First, start the macro editor just as 
you'd begin to record a macro (press Ctrl- 
F10). Next, type the name of the macro 
{Alt-Tor Alt'C, for example) you want So ed- 
it; then select 2 for Edit. You can enter 
text and commands into the macro direct- 
ly from the keyboard (see the top figure) 
or by pressing Shift-Ctrl-Page Up to 
bring up a list of macro programming com- 
mands. The WordPerfect 5.1 manual de- 
scribes each of the commands and how to 
use them. 

WPWin. This program's macros are writ- 
ten and edited in the word processor; see 




WPDOS macro editor lets you insert text and 
commands from the keyboard. 








■ ..4- 


^ 




IVT^'f !"|:-:|-^^. 


JMJ.BS ^^ _Hd "jlicJ^ 




__; ...iiii 


-* 












wr^'i 




. -J 




r ■ " 




..■=-_l 















WPWin macros are written and edited in the 
word processor. 



the bottom figure. Edit a macro in VtordPfer- 
feet for Windows the same way you would 
a document— select Open from the File 
menu and load it. You can enter text and 
commands directly or you can insert com- 
mands with the Macro Command Inserter, 
which is nothing more than a very sophis- 
ticated macro itself. WPWin comes with an 
extensive macro language. Instructions for 
using it, however, aren't included. You can 
order the WPWin Macros Manual— com- 
plete with a good tutor and the Macro Com- 
mand Inserter— from the company for 
$19.95. 

WPWin also comes with a feature you'll 
find very handy: a tracer that alerts you to 
errors in the macro code and possible prob- 
lems and solutions. 

WinWord. Word for Windows comes 
with a macro editor accessible through the 
Macro command. Text and commands 
are entered directly from the keyboard. For 
commands thai use variables, you can 
use the Variables option, which opens a di- 
aSog box containing the variables available 
to the selected command. The manual 
doesn't contain much information on Word- 
Basic, WinVtord's macro language, but it's 
shipped with a file (TECRERDOC) that you 
can load and print. TECREF.DOC also has 
online macro help. 



next word. Press F12 to turn on Select 
Mode, and then press Ctrl-Left Arrow. 
The word is highlighted. Click on Spell- 
er on the Button Bar (or select Speller 
from the Tools nnenu), click on Start, 
and then turn off tfie macro recorder. 

If thie word is spelled correctly, a 
Spell check completed box appears. If 
the word's incorrect, change it as you 
normally would in WPWin. 

WinWord. WinWord doesn't allow 
you to access the Macro menu while 
the Spelling dialog box is open. You 
can create this macro, but it requires 
some fairly sophisticated program- 
ming. See "Editing Macros" below for 
information on modifying macros. 

Transpose Two Words 

Begin with some text on your screen. 

WPDOS. Place the cursor on the 
first of the two words you want to trans- 
pose, Turn on the macro recorder, and 
then press Alt-T to define the macro. 
Type Transpose two words at the De- 
scription prompt and press Enter. 
Press Ctrl-Right Arrow to move to the 
next word. Press F12 to turn on Block; 
then press Ctrl-Left Arrow. The first 
word is selected. Press C!rl-F4 for 
Move, enter 1 for Block, and then en- 
ter 1 for Move. The word is deleted. 
Now press Ctrl-Right Arrow and press 
Enter. Turn off the macro recorder. 

When you run this macro, be sure to 

10 COMPUTE JULY 1992 



begin with the cursor on the first word 
you want to transpose. 

WPWin. Place the cursor on the 
first of the two words you want to trans- 
pose. Turn on the macro recorder. 
Type Tpose-w in the Filename field, 
type Transpose two words in the De- 
scriptive Name field, and then click on 
OK. Press Ctrl-Right Arrow to move to 
the next word, press F12 to turn on 
Block, and then press Ctrl-Left Arrow. 
The first word is selected. Click on Cut 
in the Edit menu (or on the Button Bar). 
The word is deleted. Press Ctrl-Right Ar- 
row to place the cursor one space af- 
ter the word you want to transpose. Se- 
lect Paste from the Edit menu (or from 
the Button Bar) and turn off the macro 
recorder. 

When you run this nnacro, be sure to 
begin with the cursor on the first word 
you want to transpose. 

WinWord. Place the cursor on the 
first of the two words you want to trans- 
pose. Turn on the macro recorder. 
Type TransposeWords for the Record 
Macro Name. Press 2 in the Key field 
and type Transpose two words for the 
Description; then click on OK. Press 
Ctrl-Right Arrow to move to the next 
word and Shift-Ctrl-Left Arrow to select 
the word. Click on Cut in the Edit 
menu. The word is deleted. Press Ctrl- 
Right Arrow to place the cursor one 
space after the next word. Select 



Paste from the Edit menu; then turn off 
the macro recorder. 

When you run this macro, be sure to 
begin with the cursor on the first word 
you want to transpose. 

Count Words 

Make sure you have some text on- 
screen before you start. 

WPDOS. Start the macro recorder; 
then press Alt-C to define the macro. 
Type Count words at the Description 
prompt and press Enter. Press Ctrl-F2 
for Spell and 6 for Count. When 
WordPerfect stops counting, turn off 
the macro recorder. Press Esc twice to 
return to your document. 

WPWin. You don't need a nnacro to 
count words in WPWin. Simply select 
Word Count from the Tools menu. 

WinWord. WinWord doesn't allow 
you to access the Macro menu while 
the Statistics dialog box is open. You 
can create this macro, but it requires 
some fairly sophisticated program- 
ming. See "Editing Macros" above for 
information on modifying macros. 

Transpose Two Paragraphs 

Make sure you have at least two para- 
graphs of text on your monitor. 

WPDOS. Begin with the cursor any- 
where in the first of the two paragraphs 
you want to transpose. Turn on the mac- 
ro recorder; then press Alt-P to define 




^ 


V 


(STOP), 


t- .- n 




The Oldsmobile Bravada Is So 



Intelligent, It Can Read. 

Where other vehicles meet the road, Bravada'" communicates wrth it. !! It's SmartTrakl" 
All-wheel drive sends power where traction is best. Anti-lock brakes apply pressure when 
ife needed the most. Ife two forces working together Continuously. Intelligently. It's 
something Ford Explorer hasn't learned yet. f! It's power Ifs the new ZOO-horsepower 
43-ltter V6. Standard. Its the power to tow up to 5,500 pounds* !! It's luxury. The kind 
youb find in a luxury car Its the Oldsmobile Edger' The most comprehensive owner 
satisfaction program in the industn/. Its Bravada. The vehicle that speaks to your needs 
while it reads the road. Td experience the Oldsmobile® Bravada for yourself visit your Olds 



dealer for a test drive or call 1-800-242-OLDS, Monday- Friday, 8 a.m.-7 p.m. EST 




•Wrth optbnalbcwvir-Q package and GT4 axle. Irxiudes trailer passengers, cargo and equipment. Bud* Up. America! c 1992QM Coni aj riohs tcset^kl 

iOldsmodle 

The Power Of intelligent Engineering, 



MAPPING MENUS AND KEYBOARDS 



Macros are useless if they don't save time 
and keystrokes. Running macros in Win- 
dows applications can take several 
mouse clicks, And if you forget what you 
named a macro, you have to scroll 
through a list looking at descriptions. 
WPDOS (without keyboard mapping) al- 
lows you to assign only 26 macros to Alt- 
letter combinations. Then, you're relegated 
to using one-word macros, which require 
several keystrokes — and it's not always 
easy to remember what you named them. 
Word processors overcome these nui- 
sances in several ways. WPDOS lets you de- 
fine as many different keyboard setups as 
you need. In other words, if you use a cer- 
tain set of macros for letter writing and an- 
other set for reports, you can load a dif- 
ferent keyboard file for each task. The 
Windows applications offer even more 



fifes as you have disk space. 

WPWin. Mapping options abound, Not 
only can you assign macros to CIrl-x and 
Shif1-Ctrl-x (x being a number, letter, or func- 
tion key), but you can also assign com- 
mands to keystrokes. (Consider this before 
creating macros that do the same things 
as commands.) You can assign macros lo 
the Macro menu and Button Bar, and you 
can create multiple keyboards and Button 
Bars. 

To assign macros to the keyboard, se- 
lect Preferences from the File menu and 
Keyboard from the submenu. To assign a 
macro to an existing keyboard, click on Ed- 
it (to create a new keyboard, click on Cre- 
ate). In Keyboard Editor, select Macros 
from Hem Type: then click on Add. You're 
given a list of macros. Double-click on the 
macro you want to add and press the 



WPWin's Keyboard Editor assigns macros to WPWin lets you assign up to 18 macros to 
keystrolies and creates new l<eyboards. tlie Macro menu. 



flexibility — assigning macros not only to key- 
strokes but also to menus and, in WPWin, 
to the Button Bar. WinWord 2.0 supports 
macros on its Toolbar. 

Each program's approach is slightly dif- 
ferent. The foliowing includes a description 
of the procedure for each one. 

WPDOS. WPDOS supports two types of 
macros: Alt-letter comtiinations and word 
macros. It also lets you change keyboard 
layouts. To do so, go into Setup (Shift-FI), 
select Keyboard Layout, and then select 
Create. You're prompted to name the new 
keyboard file. Type the new name (eight or 
fewer characters), highlight the new Key- 
board name with Down Arrow or Up Arrow, 
press Enter to select it, and press Enter 
again to return to the document screen. 
You can assign macros to the keyboard as 
desired and create as many keyboard 



keys you want to assign the macro to (no 
Alt combinations are allowed). Click on OK 
to close Keyboard Editor and again on OK 
to close Keyboard, 

Please note that before you map a mac- 
ro to the keyboard, it must be run once to 
be compiled. 

To assign macros to the Button Bar, se- 
lect Button Bar Setup from the View menu; 
then click on Edit in the submenu. Click on 
Assign Macro to Button in the Edit Button 
Bar. Double-click on the macro you want to 
assign: then click on OK to close the But- 
ton Bar editor. 

You assign macros to the Macro menu 
with the Assign to Menu command on the 
Macro menu. 

WinWord. Word for Windows lets you as- 
sign macros to any menu, to the Toolbar, 
and to keystrokes. A word of caution, how- 



ever. You can assign macros globally or to 
templates — so be sure you assign macros 
in the setup you want. 

To assign macros to the keyboard, se- 
lect Options from the Tools menu, and 
then scroll through the Category icons and 
select Keyboard. Select the macro you 
want to assign; then press the keys you 
want it assigned to (Currently tells you 
whether the combination is already as- 
signed). Click on Assign and then on OK. 

To assign macros to menus, select Op- 
tions from the Tools menu. Scroll through 
the Category icons and select Menus. Mak- 
ing sure that Macros is checked in the 
Show option, select the macro you want to 
assign; select the target menu in the Menu 
list; and then, in the Menu Text box, type 
what you want the menu listing to say (for 
example. Transpose words]. If you place 






T 


T.^^l Nl" 


i "• i 




'—I 

1 

-1 




1 


:.:..':::: 


■'■■••■>'•• 
■'..' 










WinW:?rd lets you reassign macros to 
keystrokes througli Options. 

an ampersand (&) before a letter, then af- 
ter opening the menu, you can run the mac- 
ro with a keystroke, &Transpose words 
would appear on the menu like this: Trans- 
pose words. If you also assign a keystroke 
combination, it would appear as Transpose 
words Shift-i-Ctrl+T 

To assign macros to the Toolbar, select 
Options from the Tools menu, and then 
scroll through Category icons and select 
Toolbar, The Options dialog box changes. 
Select the macro you want to assign from 
the Macros list, and choose the button you 
want to represent it from the Buttons list. In 
the Tool to Change list, select the tool you 
want to replace. Click on Change and 
then on Close. 

You can assign macros to keystrokes 
during creation or at any other time with 
Options. 



the macro. At the Description prompt, 
type Transpose paragraphs and press 
Enter. Press Ctrl-F4 for Move, select 2 
for Paragraph, and enter 1 for Move. 
The first paragraph is deleted. Press 
F2 for Search, and at the Srch prompt, 
press Enter to search for a hard return. 
Press F2 to start the search. The cur- 
sor is on the line beneath the second 
paragraph. Press Enter, and then turn 
off the macro recorder. 

When you run this macro, make 
sure you place the cursor on the first of 
the two paragraphs. 

12 COMPUTE JULY 1992 



WPWin. Begin wWh the cursor any- 
where in the first of the two paragraphs 
you want to transpose. Turn on the mac- 
ro recorder; type Tpose-p in the File- 
name field and Transpose paragraphs 
in the Descriptive Name field. Click on 
OK. Choose Select from the Edit menu 
and Paragraph from the submenu. Se- 
lect Cut from the Edit menu. The first 
paragraph is deleted. Now select 
Search from the Edit menu. In the 
Search dialog box, click on the Codes 
button. Scroll through the list of codes 
and double-click on HRt; then click on 



Close. Click on Search. To insert the 
first paragraph, sefect Paste from the 
Edit menu (or the Button Bar). Turn off 
the macro recorder. 

When you run this macro, make 
sure you place the cursor on the first 
paragraph. 

WinWord. Begin with the cursor at 
the beginning of the first line (before 
the tab indention) in the first of the two 
paragraphs you want to transpose. 
Turn on the macro recorder; type Trans- 
poseParagraphs for the Macro Record 
Name and Transpose adjacent para- 



QuickVerse^ is much more — 
Ifs the fast and friendly way 
to delve deeply into the 
Scriptures. Searching is nearly 
effortless, so you have plenty of 
quality time for personal reflection. 

■ Attach notes and comments to any 
word or verse and use the electronic 
bookmark feature to tiighlight important 
passages. 

■ Study up to four translations side by 

side, making comparisons quick and 
easy. Or, study more than one passage 
from the same translation. 

■ Find every occurrence of any word or 
phrase in seconds. Search the entire Old 

and New Testaments, or linut your 
search to a specific book or chapter. 

■ Copy verses dbectly into your word 
processor documents with QitickVerse 
Companion — the best Bible-to-word 
processor interface available. 

■ Explore the original meaning behind 
the English translations with the 
Hebrew and Greek Transliterated Bible; it 
comes with an on-line Hebrew and 
Greek dictionary — and puts original lan- 
guage study within reach of everyone. 

New! Add NAVE'S TOPICAL BIBLE 
to QuickVerse, and gain the 
ability to search by topic, rather 
than just words and phrases. Your search 
on the topic "marriage," for example, 
leads you to Genesis 2:23,24 {the marriage 
of Adam and Eve) even though the word 
"marriage" is not mentioned in those 
verses. More than 20,000 topics and sub- 
topics are just a keystroke away! The 
Nave's Topical Bible works with 
any QuickVerse Bible translation and is 
only $39. Call for details! 

QuickVerse 2.0 is only S69 and comes with one 
Bible text of your choice. Choose from King 
James \fersion, New King James \fersion, 
Revised Standard \fersion, New Revised 
Standard \fersion, New International \fersion 
and The Living Bible (NIV is $79). Add 
individual texts and the Hebrew and Greek 
Transliterated Bible for only $39 each (NIV S49}. 
QuickVerse 2.0 requires mi IBM or compatible PC xuith 
S12K RAM, DOSlMor higher and a hard disk. 

Guaranteed. 

If you're not 100% satisfied with 

QuickVerse, simply return it within 

30 days for a full product refund. 

PARSONS 

TECHNOLOGY 




the Bible on 
your computec 



'im\m\ 



.JMUJEUBl 



Sir 



JJJJJJJg 

I" r r r r i: r 



i^iai-3lM» 



isiaiiiifiippap 



icP 



it 



m 



Nave 



Wfivi 



Bibh 



I 



^opiml 



One Parsons Dtive • PO Box 100 • Hiawatha. lA 52233-0100 

Priorily. 1882707 



0uickVerse*2j 

Less time seeldng and more time finding! 

Available at your local Christian bookstore, or call toll-free to o 

1-800-223-6925 



Huinb«r243 , 



graphs for the Description. Press P in 
the Key field. Click on OK. Press Shift- 
Ctrl-Down Arrow to select the first par- 
agraph. Choose Cut from the Edit 
menu (or the Toolbar). The first para- 
graph is defeted. Press Shift-Down Ar- 
row to move to the next paragraph. To 
insert the first paragrapfi, select Paste 
from the Edit menu (or the Toolbar). 
Turn off the macro recorder. 

When you run this macro, be sure to 
place the cursor at the beginning of 
the first line in the first of the two para- 
graphs you want to transpose. 

Insert Bullet 

You can make items in a list stand out 
from straight text if you set them up as 
a bulleted list with a hanging indent. 

WPDOS. Begin with the cursor 
where you want to start a bulleted list. 
Start the macro recorder and press Alt- 
B to define the macro. Type Bullet at 
the Description prompt: then press En- 
ter. Press Ctrl-V for Compose. At the 
Key= prompt, type 4,0 and press En- 
ter. Press F4 for Indent, and stop the 
macro recorder. 

WPWin. Begin with the cursor 
where you want to start a bulleted list. 
Start the macro recorder and type Bul- 
let in the Filename field and Insert bul- 
let in the Descriptive Name field. Click 
on OK. Press Ctrl-W for WordPerfect 
Characters. Type 4,0 in the Number 
field and click on Insert and then on 
Close. Select Paragraph from the Lay- 
out menu, and select Indent from the 
submenu. Stop the macro recorder. 

WinWord. WinWord is shipped with 
a bullet macro on the Toolbar. 

Letter Template 

Begin with a new document screen. At 
the instruction Type return address, 
type in the following information: 

Your Name, Title 

Your Company 

Your Company's Street Address 

The City, State ZIP code 

WPDOS. Start the macro recorder. 
Press Alt-L to define the macro, and 
type Letter template at the Description 
prompt. Press Enter. Press Shift-F8 for 
Format; select 2 for Page and 5 for Top/ 
Bottom margins. Type 1.75 (or the 
measurement for your stationery). 
Press Enter twice. Select 1 for Center 
Page and Y for Yes; then press Enter. 
Press 1 for Line, 3 for Justification, and 
1 for Left. Then press Enter twice to re- 
turn to the document screen. 

To enter the current date, press Shift- 
PS, and then select 2 for Date. Press En- 



ter twice to insert a blank line. Type Re- 
turn address. Press Enter twice, and 
then type Dear Press Ctrl-FlO to end 
the macro record. You're now ready to 
type the letter. 

WPWin. Start the macro recorder. In 
the Filename field, type Letter Type Let- 
ter template in the Descriptive Name 
field. Click on OK. Select Margins 
from the Layout menu, press Tab 
twice to move to Top. and type 1.75 
(or the measurement for your station- 
ery). Click on OK. Select Page from the 
Layout menu; then select Center Page 
from the submenu. Select Date from 
the Tools menu and select Text from 
the submenu. Press Enter twice to in- 
sert a blank space. Type Return ad- 
dress, press Enter twice, and type 
Dear. Turn off the recorder. You're now 
ready to begin typing the letter. 

WinWord. WinWord is shipped with 
a very sophisticated letter-template mac- 
ro. It is, in fact, an impressive example 
of the power of WordBasic, WinWord's 
macro language. Access the template 
by selecting New from the File menu 
and then double-clicking on Letter in 
the templates list. You can modify mar- 
gins, fonts, and other settings as need- 
ed. Be sure to save the template after 
you've changed the settings 

Insert Text (Closing a Letter) 

Begin with an empty screen or at the 
end of a letter you want to close. At the 
Type the signature block instruction in 
each procedure, follow these steps: 
Type Thanks for your time and consid- 
eration. Then press Enter. Type Sincere- 
ly, and press Enter 4 times. Then type 
in your name, title, and company. 

WPDOS. Start the macro recorder, 
and then press Alt-E. Type End letter 
at the Description prompt and press En- 
ter. Type the signature block. Stop the 
macro recorder. 

WPWin. Start the macro recorder. 
Type Close in the Filename field and 
Close letter in the Descriptive Name 
field. Click on OK. Type the signature 
block, and stop the macro recorder. 

WinWord. The letter template 
shipped with WinWord provides sever- 
al letter-closing options. 

Sign a Letter 

For this macro, you need a scanned im- 
age of your signature. If you don't 
have a scanner, you can have your 
signature scanned at a desktop publish- 
ing service bureau for a nominal fee. 

First, use your word processor's 
graphics import, placing, and sizing op- 
tions to create a document that looks 
like the one in the following example. 

WPDOS and WPWin users, save the 
file as SIGNBL0C.WP5. WinWord us- 
ers, don't save the document; instead. 



go to the WinWord procedure below. 
WPWin users, record the macro at the 
end of a letter you want to sign. 

WPDOS. Turn on the recorder. 
Press Alt-S to define the macro, type 
Sign letter a[ Description, and press En- 




Using a scanned Image of your signature, 
create a document like this. 

ter. Press Shift-10 for Retrieve: then 
type SIGNBLOC.WP5 (be sure to in- 
clude path information, if applicable). 
Press Y to retrieve current document. 
Stop the recorder. 

WPWin. Select Record from the Mac- 
ro menu. Type Sign in the Filename 
field and Sign tetter in the Descriptive 
Name field. Click on OK. Select Re- 
trieve from the File menu; then type 
SIGNBL0C.WP5 for the Filename (be 
sure to include path information, if ap- 
plicable). Click on OK; then click on 
Yes to retrieve current document. 
Stop the macro recorder. 

WinWord. The most efficient way to 
insert data into a WinWord document 
is with Glossary, an extension of Win- 
Word's Merge feature. The procedure 
is simple: Select the data you want to 
include in the glossary, choose Glossa- 
ry from the Edit menu, name the glos- 
sary, and then click on Define. Each 
time you want to use the data, insert a 
glossary bookmark using the Field op- 
tion on the Insert menu. 

This procedure is detailed in the Win- 
Word manual. If you'd rather create a 
macro, the procedure is almost identi- 
cal to the one in WPWin except that 
you'd name the signature block file 
SIGNBL0C.DOC and select File. . , 
from the Insert menu to retrieve it. 

The Sky's tlie Limit 

As macros go, these ten are simple. 
Once you get the hang of creating 
them, you're limited only by your inge- 
nuity (and bravado). You can make 
them pause so you can type text and 
then restart them again, and you can 
create different versions of the same 
document based on different variables. 
The two for Windows even let you pro- 
gram dialog boxes that ask questions 
on how to proceed. Let your imagina- 
tion be your guide. □ 



14 



COMPUTE JULY 1992 




Discover Star's new NX-2430 printer. 
Laser features at 1/3 the price. 

Because its features and performance are so much like a laser, you'd think 
the new NX-2430 Multi-Font was actually a laser printer. It has 13 scalable fonts, 
which allow you the creative freedom to customize your documents. And it has the 
extra conveniences that make lasers so easy to use, like real-time LCD display and 
automatic emulation switching. What's more, its print quality is excellent tor both 
text and graphics. 

But don't be fooled— the NX-2430 Multi-Font is a very reliable, extremely 
affordable, 24-pin dot matrix. And it's backed by Star's exclusive 2-Year Parts and 
Labor Warranty. For more information, call 1-800-447-4700. 



SCALABLE 

Aaa 


AUTO 


LCD 




LANDSCAPE 


DPI 


AEC 


iSi^ 


FONTS 


EMULATION 


DISPLAY 


OUIETMODE 


LOADING 




IT TAKES A LITTLE EXTRA TO BE A STAR, 



circle Reader Service Number 113 



READERSHIP SURVEY 



IVfe want COMPUTE to be as useful 
and interesting as possible and to pro- 
vide you with f/ie coverage you want. 
Please help us by tai<ing a moment to 
fill out and send us this questionnaire. 
You can mail the completed question- 
naire to us (photocopies are fine), fax 
it, or use COMPUTE/NET to respond. 

Mail: COMPUTE Readership Survey, 
324 West Wendover Avenue, Suite 200, 
Greensboro, North Carolina 27408 

Fax:(919)275-9837 

COMPUTE/NET: COMPUTE on GEnie 
or America Online 

What computer(s) do you own or use? 

D 8088/8086 (IBM PC, XT or compati- 
ble), brand 

° 80286, brand 

° 80386, brand 

^ Notebook/laptop, brand 



Macintosh, model. 



^ Game system, brand. 



^ Other 

^ I don't own or use a computer. 

Which video display system(s) do you 
use? 

Monochrome 
'-' Hercules 
° CGA 
° EGA 
° VGA 
° Super VGA 

Which peripheral(s) do you own or use 
with your computer? 

5y<i-inch disk drive 
^ 3y2-inch disk drive 
° CD-ROM drive 
'-' Dot-matrix printer 
'-' Fax modem 
° Hard disk 
^ Laser printer 
'-' Letter quality printer 
° MIDI device 
^ Modem 

Mouse 
'-' PostScript printer 
^ Sound card 
'-' Speakers 

16 COMPUTE JULY 1992 




How much memory does your comput- 
er have? 
a 640K or less 
a 1MB 
D 2MB 
a 4MB 
° 8MB 

Which operating system{s)/environ- 

ment(s) do you use? 

° MS-DOS version 

° DR DOS version 

D 

D 



D 



OS/2 

Microsoft Windows 
Tandy DeskMate 
Other 



Which parts of the magazine do you 
like the most? 
° Art Works 
° COMPUTE/NET 

° COMPUTE'S Getting Started With spe- 
cial sections 
'-' Editorial License 
'-' Features 
'-' Feedback 
O GamePlay 
^ Hardware Clinic 
° IntroDOS 
° Multimedia PC 
° News & Notes 
° On Disk 
° Pathways 
'-' Personal Productivity 
° Point & Click 
'-' Programming Power 



a Reviews 
D SharePak 
n Test Lab 
D Tips & Tools 

Which of the following computer- related 

topics do you like to read about? 

n Databases 

n Desktop publishing 

n Disk management and MS-DOS 

n Education 

■^ Games and entertainment 

n Graphics (paint, draw, or CAD) 

□ How to upgrade your PC 

n Integrated software 

1^ Local area networks (LANs) 

1^ Money management 

D Multimedia 

n New computer technologies 

O New hardware 

1^ Pen computing 

^ Programming 

^ Spreadsheets 

^ Telecommunications 

'-' Windows 

'-' Word processing 

° Other 

Where do you use your PC? 
° Home 
° Work 
° School 
° Other 

Where did you get this copy of 
COMPUTE? 

Subscription 

Newsstand 
° Other 

How long have you been reading 

COMPUTE? 

'-' Less than two years 

^ Two years or more 

If you have a modem, which online serv- 

ice(s) do you use? 

^ America Online 

^ CompuServe 

° COMPUTE/NET 

° Delphi 

° GEnie 

° Other , 





With CompuServe, you 11 always 
have more to look forward to. 

It's one tiling to discover sometliing you like. 
But to realize there's more of it than you ever 
imagined is even better. And that's what CompuSen'e 
is all about. 

Tap into travel information, hotel reserva- 
tions, stock quotes, hard\\are and software suppon, 
a shopping mall, the news, interactive games, and 
forums. For the experienced user, there's even free 
software and shareware. On-screen menus and an 
index make it all easy to access, so you get the most 
out of your time and money. 



A one-time membership fee and S7.9S a 
month lot you use our basic services as often as you 
like: news, sports, weather, shopping, reference 
materials, our E-mail service of 60 messages a month, 
and more. Plus, there's a whole universe of other 
services available at nominal additional charges. 

For more information or to order, see your 
computer dealer or call 1 800 848-8199. Outside 
the United States, call 614 457-0802. Because no 
information service lets you dig deeper or farther 
than CompuServe, 

CompuServe" 

The information service you won't outgrow. 



Circle Reader Service Number 103 



TEST LAB 



Edited by Mike Hudnall 

Is there a Windows word proc- 
essor in your future? If you're 
looking for power and fea- 
tures, the packages in this 
month's Test Lab offer a number 
of capabilities rarely seen in DOS 
word processors; WYSIWYG ed- 
iting, desktop publishing's graph- 
ical and formatting tools, Win- 
dows' interactivity, and a com- 
mon user interface. Many of the 
packages also boast special 
tools to make them stand out 
from the crowd, such as grammar 
checkers, complete drawing pro- 
grams, equation editors, and ad- 
vanced macro languages. 

One requirement shared by all 
Windows word processors dis- 
cussed in this section is a power- 
ful computer: at least a 386SX 
(though a 386DX or one of the 486 
chips would be preferable) and 
4MB of RAM. Most of the products 
claim that they can run on a 286 
with 1MB of RAM. But when you 
read this claim, remember that you 
can also jog underwater. Doing so, 
however, will test your endurance, 
and it won't take you very far. If you 
have a lesser system, you'll have 
to put up with very poor perform- 
ance from these programs; in 
fact, you'd be better off using a 
DOS word processor or GeoWrite. 
That said, let's take a look at 
the features most of the Windows 
word processors share. You 
might think of these as the 
baseline of features — reasons to 
make the switch to word process- 
ing under Windows. If you're con- 
sidering a word processor that 
doesn't offer one or more of the 
options mentioned here, you'll be 
missing out on something 
everyone else takes for granted. 
Although most Windows word 
processors share a majority of fea- 
tures, implementation varies con- 
siderably. WordPerfect still uses 
boxes (entities separate from the 
page and featuring their own edi- 
tor) instead of the more common 
frames (entities integrated into the 
page and using the same editor 

18 COMPUTE JULY 1992 



as the page) for graphics and 
incidental text. DeScribe requires 
that frames be created to contain 
all text and graphics. Ami Pro's 
frames are much easier to work 
with than Word's. Ami Pro seems 
to assume that you want to work 
with the frame itself — sizing and 
moving it — whereas Word seems 
to assume that you're more inter- 
ested in working with the contents 
of the frame and makes selecting 
the frame and working with its size 
and shape more awkward. 
Almost all of the word proces- 



Windows word processors al- 
most universally offer styles for 
specially formatting paragraphs 
(WordPerfect also allows for open- 
ended styles that format the en- 
tire document). In addition, they 
provide options like lines and bor- 
ders that allow you to box a page 
or a frame and to put lines be- 
tween paragraphs and columns. 

You can find table editors on 
many Windows word processors. 
Most allow you to create a table by 
simply specifying the number of 
cells and rows, while others re- 




! ill: N.iiim 


Cnntriil 


,1^ VHsriifil iliK: 
l> Vhmlti ilm: 


1. 


^■1^^' 


^ 

? 




h Mlhiilt) W[HI 


1 WORD FOR WJNDOWS 2.0 \ 








■ »f-,..i.i,-j c . ' .-.■■. . . ■ 

^■■■.iIljrVK*r-;i'lB\l..f»,i.-.r.lKMt9<l.W. ^ITlaWu-^**,..*^^!, A Py^^^vl 
1,1.1, .V*t..^T.^,»'(.*.'iit..|''V».A^'i-i::.ii«M «»M(4«J«H(.V <l^v^4f , 





ft«Mll... I j CopT. . I : Optjont... I I acMm j fl Hi.™ .is ricnl l>nlf 



►r r 



Pn 1 



ItE 



An attractive, easy interface is part of the Windows appeal. 



sors feature draft mode (allowing 
you to work with text as text rath- 
er than as formatted copy), but 
Ami Pro retains almost all of the 
formatting in draft mode while 
WordPerfect's draft mode looks al- 
most exactly like what you would 
find in WordPerfect for DOS 
(right down to the light gray let- 
ters and the btue background). 
Most Windows word proces- 
sors also provide a series of dif- 
ferent kinds of views. In addition 
to the draft mode, most allow you 
to zoom in on your text to see it 
enlarged and zoom out to see a 
whole page or two side-by-side 
pages at once. Sonne allow you 
to specify a view according to per- 
centage of full size. 



quire additional information about 
the width of the table. Some allow 
for the full range of table customi- 
zation, including varying column 
width and row height, different out- 
line schemes, shading, table out- 
line, captioning, and even colors. 
Most also offer a rudimentary 
spreadsheet operation. 

Not only Windows word proc- 
essors but nearly all word proc- 
essors now offer spelling checkers 
as standard equipment. Thesaurus- 
es have also gone from useful ex- 
tras to must-haves, and now the 
thesaurus in WordStar for Win- 
dows goes the extra mile, offering 
definitions, alternative words, 
near synonyms, and antonyms. 

Mail merge (or simply merge) 



is a powerful feature that you can 
use for preparing mass mailings 
for business purposes (you can 
also use it to generate a Christ- 
mas letter or other announce- 
ments of family events) using a da- 
ta file and a form letter. 

Most of the programs dis- 
cussed here offer macros, allow- 
ing you to assign a macro to a 
menu or to an icon bar. In this 
way, you can make your person- 
al commands as much a part of 
the program as the commands 
created by the programmers. 

Look for special file managers 
with your word processor. Look for 
master document features, too. 
Most Windows word processors 
allow you to group document files 
into complete publications for print- 
ing and editing. Most also offer ta- 
ble of contents and index genera- 
tors that will automatically create 
these features for a master doc- 
ument, checking each of the com- 
ponent documents in turn. 

The remainder of the shared fea- 
tures are common user interface 
features — the standard keypress- 
es and the file-management and 
document-processing tools. 

What will probably impress you 
most about these packages is 
their desktop publishing capabil- 
ities. Each approaches desktop 
publishing in a slightly different 
way, but all seem to have it as 
their central focus. Let's face it — 
no one would put up with a Win- 
dows application if it didn't offer 
superior formatting and control 
along with its WYSIWYG interface. 
Many writers will prefer to stick 
with the DOS word processor they 
know and love. If you're looking be- 
yond writing and you want to turn 
out splendid documents, you 
must ask yourself which tools are 
most valuable to you, seek out the 
word processor that offers them, 
and start publishing. 

No one can pick the perfect 
word processor for you, but the 
reviews and the features grid in 
this month's Test Lab will help 
you make that decision. 

ROBERT BIXBY 



Ami Pro 2.0 

IBM PC and compatibles (80286 or 
faster), 1MB RAM (2MB or more 
recommended)— $495* 

LOTUS DEVELOPMENT 

1000 Abemathy Rd. NE 
Bulldino 400, Ste. 1700 
Atlama, GA 30328 
(800) 831-9679 
(404) 391-0011 



AMI PRO 2.0 

Like the other word processors in 
this month's Test Lab, Ami Pro 
2.0 has a long list of text-editing, 
page-formatting, screen-display, 
and file-handling features. It's 
both fast and polished, as you'd 
expect with a second-generation 
application from a company the 
size of Lotus. Choosing the best 
of the group is a tough decision; 
these are all powerful programs, 
However, Ami Pro clearly stands 
out from the others in three are- 
as: advanced layout features, ex- 
tensive support for styles and mac- 
ros, and a fully integrated design. 

Using Ami Pro's layout fea- 
tures, it's relatively easy to create 
documents that look as though 
they've been desktop published. 
Ami Pro uses frames to let you cre- 
ate, move, and alter the size of 
your graphics. You can fix a 
frame on a page, repeat it across 
multiple pages, make it transpar- 
ent, and have text flow around it. 
Graphics can be rotated, flipped, 
scaled, cropped, edited, adjusted 
for gray scale, and created from 
scratch with the built-in drawing 
and charting programs. 

Ami Pro includes support for 24- 
bit color graphics (for 16 million col- 
ors) and can create multiple col- 
umns of varying widths and gutter 
sizes. Styles let you save and 
reuse a document's text and lay- 
out preferences. In Ami Pro, styles 
can include text, graphics, and au- 
tomatic macros. They're very flexi- 
ble; you can move a style from a 
document to a style sheet or the 
other way around. You can create 



AmiPro 

./o/-\\'iJi(i()\v.s 





global styles that operate across 
more than one document — so that 
when you change a style, the con- 
nected documents are updated 
automatically. 

The macro language is just as 
powerful. Add your own menu 
items and create dialog boxes 
that change according to the us- 
er's response. Once you've cre- 
ated a macro, link it to one of Ami 
Pro's Smartlcons. These are small 
icons that you can place at the 
top, bottom, left, or right of the 
screen. You can also float them so 
they can be quickly moved to the 
least obtrusive position. 

The package ships with 100 
icons; you can use the integrated 
drawing program to create your 
own. The program comes with 27 
preprogrammed Smartlcons, in- 
cluding ones that let you save, 
print, cut, paste, change viewing 
levels, show or hide the ruler, and 
check a document's spelling. 

With the new Power Fields fea- 
ture, you can embed a macro di- 
rectly into a document. For exam- 
ple, a business letter could auto- 
matically request the name of a per- 
son, look up the current address 
in another file, and place the 
name and address into the letter 
using a special predefined format. 

In the area of integrated de- 
sign. Ami Pro receives top honors 
for its group of tightly integrated pro- 

"Customerswho have purchased aversion 
of Ami Pro since March !. 1991. are eligi- 
ble 10 upgrade to Ami Pro 2.0 lor a suggest- 
ed retail price of S49. For all Other Ami Pro 
users, upgrades are S99 



JULY 1992 COMPUTE 



19 



TEST LAB 



iMaogMl!BjOM£4EBJii ;'; 

Double T 



DOUBLE.SAM] 
Tools 




WfllllllW llll| 

;|m:I|: i:Iiim:(., 
Lilih.-,-.. 



Iiii.iilr i'rai.C!i'sl)ii|n 

Pi*<)(:hicti( :s:;: 



Science Rclion Is 
More Pro(ital)le 
Than Romance 



■im'nmTfUi 

I )iii. i.\\m\iA\r. . 

:>iiTi.,, 

tor. ItnJi-x... 

"■-.er SpNip... 



M 




Tt^i. ili.irl rMuJr.iIi^vlliclnidnci.tl liriitlil) Duclilc Tdle 
t' •-X^.l ...•»-. I ...I I ..: ■■■ t. - .1. - - t... i: ■■ I (^ r^ 



Use Ami Pro 2.0's revision marking to !<eep track of document changes. 



grams: a draw program, a chart- 
making program, an image-proc- 
essing program, a table editor, an 
equation editor, and an outlining 
program. Because of its unique in- 
tegration of component programs, 
everything in a document can be 
edited in place, right on the page, 
including drawings, charts, equa- 
tions, scanned images, and ta- 
bles. You make your changes in 
the document itself, not in a sepa- 
rate screen or view. 

Other significant features in 
Ami Pro include the ability to in- 
telligently import documents in a 
variety of word processor for- 
mats, including WordPerfect, Mi- 
crosoft Word, rvlicrosoft Word for 
Windows 1.0. WordStar, Multi- 
Mate, DispiayWrite, ASCII, RFT, 
and DCA. Lotus calls this "no- 
questions-asked file import." You 
simply select the file, and the pro- 
gram takes care of converting the 
file to Ami Pro's native format. 

Ami Pro can also import an 
impressive number of graphics for- 
mats, including EPS. PIC, PCX, 
CGM, HPGL, WMF, TIF, BMP 
and DrawPerfect. In addition, you 
can import data from other kinds 
of applications, including those 
that save in dBASE, Paradox, Lo- 
tus 1-2-3, Excel, SuperCalc, and 

20 COMPUTE JULY 1992 



DIF formats. A handy Status Bar 
lets you quickly alter the current 
style sheet, typeface, type size, 
editing mode, page number, and 
location of the Smartlcon display. 
It dynamically displays program 
information by showing such mes- 
sages as Playing macros and 
Comparing documents. It also 
works with Lotus's own cc:Mail 
for Windows to let you know 
when you have new mail. 

Add extensive revision marking 
and document comparison, ex- 
tremely fast printing, four-level un- 
do, and a free copy of Adobe 
Type Manager, and you have a 
powerful word processor that you 
won't outgrow any time soon. On 
the downside, you can't edit in the 
facing-pages view, select a whole 
document, or flow text from frame 
to frame. And if you want the mac- 
ros manual, you'll have to spring 
for the developer's kit, which 
costs an additional $9.95. 

All in all, Ami Pro is well round- 
ed and feature rich. It stands up 
well against any Windows word 
processor, including Microsoft 
Word for Windows 2.0. For ad- 
vanced layout features, it's defi- 
nitely the one to choose. 

DAVID ENGLISH 

Circle Reader Service Number 304 



DESCRIBE WORD 
PROCESSOR 3.0 

Describe Word Processor 3.0 is 
sort of like a quirky college friend 
of mine: It doesn't always act the 
way you expect it to; it's not afraid 
to take a different route to reach 
the same destination; and, de- 
spite its strange appearance, it's 
a hard worker that gets the job 
done, Some of the program's ec- 
centricities can be traced back to 
its origin — it was first released for 
IBM's OS/2 operating system. 

The Describe disks include ver- 
sions for both Windows and OS/2, 
making the program a logical 
choice if your working environment 
includes both operating systems. 

Describe works with the con- 
cept of objects. Each distinct 
block of text — such as a head- 
line, footnote, outline, or body 
copy — is treated as a separate ob- 
ject, which can be moved, re- 
sized, and restyled, Graphics are 
treated as objects as well. While 
this approach makes working 
with complicated document for- 
mats a snap, it does take some 
getting used to if you've never 
dealt with an object-oriented 
word processor. 

The text and graphics tools, 
contained in small, movable 
toolbar windows, can be sent 
away or summoned back with a 
simple click of the right mouse but- 
ton, so they don't use valuable 
screen real estate when they're 
not needed. The dialog boxes 
and menu choices are logically la- 
beled and arranged, and compre- 
hensive help is available for 
each item. You hide the toolbars 
and turn off the rulers and bor- 
ders to get the maximum amount 
of text onscreen. 

Describe deviates from accept- 
ed Windows standards in some 
operations, probably a by-prod- 
uct of its OS/2 heritage. For exam- 
ple, to access a menu, you press 
and then release Alt before press- 
ing the letter of the menu, instead 
of holding Alt down while press- 



PUN-M4K(NG SOFTimRE: # 



Abracadata 



(he source ol plan-making software 



DESIGN YOUR OWN HOME" 






% 



^rp 



Us,. 



LJ 





^ GRAPHIC 
VEGETABLE 
GARDEN DESIGN 



^l^ 



ARCHITECTURE 

Everylfiing you need to draw archllectural plans, from floor plans to 
siructural details, is now available at the click of your computer mouse. 
This object ofiented program features auto dimensions, pre-drawn objects, 
plan layering, and printer support. 



9^W!^ni!^P^ 







SPROUT! is a complete 

planning tool for vegetable 

gardeners. Its unique planting 

tool produces a graptiic, 

scalable garden plan with 

correct plant and row spacing. 

In addition, SPflOWr/ contains 

a fully editable database of vegetables for 7 climate regions; and it 

prints out garden layouts, calendars, shopping lists, and reports. 




INTERIORS 



LANDSCAPE 



Draw room plans, arrange furniture Create complete landscape plans, 



and explore color sctiemes. Great 
for kitchen and batti design 



age plants to determine correct 
placement, and prepare shopping 
list for your trip to the nursery, 

MacConnection Price Per Program '55 "" 

PC Connection Price Per Program i4goo 



, [ I I [ : 

'*"' ** * * * * ** ** * » « ■ » * ' » I * 

•-- • ■ i i iii n ii iimm i mimi 




MacConnection . . . 

PC Connection . . . 
$3500 



EVERYBODTS PLANNER DESIGN YOUR OWN RAILROAD' 






". . . our low-priced 
favorite" 

Eric W. Skopec and 
Laree Kiely, Taking 
Charge: Time 
Management For 
Personal And 
Professional 
Productivity {^^S^ 
Addison-Wesley 
Publishing Co., Inc.). 

Everybody's Planner 

is an affordable and 
easy-to-use project 
manager wtiicti 
contains two complete programs. SCHEDULES creates 
critical-path-based P.E.R.T. charts and calendars, providing 
7 text reports and 2 graph (Gantt) reports. FLOWCHARTS 
uses 19 rotatable shapes in 9 sizes, vertical and horizontal 
labeling, and color to depict flow. 

*PC Connection 54p W 

For FREE Color Catalog from Abracadata: 
Call: 800-451-4871 or FAX: 503-683-1925 




1/ 






I hitmm'fiii WBB B 



Design precision, to-scale, (HO, N, Z, 0, S, G) layouts and run z 

realistic railroad simulations. | 

*PC Connection ^39^^ g 

* Not currently available lor Macintosh | 

PC Connection^ 800-800-6823 I 

MacConneaion® 800-800-6827 I 



TEST LAB 




ing the letter. And perhaps the 
most annoying omission is the 
lacl< of a draft mode for faster 
screen refreshes. Although De- 
Scribe is reasonably speedy on 
machines with a 386DX chip or 
better, it's quite poky on a 386SX. 

What makes DeScribe a seri- 
ous contender in the Windows 
word processor race? It features 
a wonderful set of 50 predefined 
style sheets, including brochures, 
invitations, faxes, invoices, mem- 
os, to-do lists, envelopes, and 
more. Other well-implemented fea- 
tures include automatic drop 
caps, DDE support, mail merge, 
search and replace with pattern 
matching, table generation, and au- 
tomatic handling of widows and or- 
phans. There's even a facility that 
allows programmers to launch a 
compiler from within DeScribe and 
compile the current document, al- 
lowing you to use DeScribe as a 
sophisticated text editor. 

DeScribe's most unique fea- 
ture is its infinite undo capability. 
Every action you've taken since 
you most recently saved the file — 
whether it's changing a word or 
inserting a graphic — can be un- 
done a step at a time. 

If there's a feature you're miss- 
ing, such as word count, you can 
probably add it with DML (De- 
scribe Macro Language). This 
comprehensive language, struc- 
tured like a hybrid of BASIC and 
Pascal, is reasonably easy to 

22 COMPUTE JULY 1992 



Describe Word Processor 3.0 
IBM PC and compatibles (S0386SX 
or faster, 80488 recommended), 
3fflB RAM (4MB recommended), 
CGA or higher graphics (VGA 
recommended), 2MB tree hard dish 
space (10MB recommended); 
mouse recommended— $495 
(upgrades from previous versions 
free) 

DESCRIBE 

4047 N. Freeway Blvd. 
Sacramento, CA 95834 
(916) 646-1111 



learn. DeScribe includes 30 sam- 
ple macros and a Macro Manual 
with the package. 

DeScribe's spelling checker 
and thesaurus are a pleasure to 
use. You can check the spelling of 
a particular word, or you can auto- 
matically check all the text in a sin- 
gle object or the entire document. 
The spelling checker also includes 
definitions, which are particularly 
handy if you're not sure you're us- 
ing the correct spelling of a word 
for a particular context. 'While De- 
scribe has a conventional user dic- 
tionary, it also allows individual doc- 
ument dictionaries, so you can 
add words and abbreviations that 



are specific to a particular docu- 
ment. The thesaurus offers syno- 
nyms, antonyms, related words, 
contrasted words, and compared 
words, as well as definitions. 

DeScribe's drawing tools are 
as good as those found in some 
basic structured drawing pro- 
grams. You can create art in 16 
colors using filled or hollow cir- 
cles, Bfeier curves, ovals, lines, 
polygons, rectangles, rounded 
rectangles, and squares. Line siz- 
es from hairline to 12 points and 
22 fill patterns are also support- 
ed. Graphics may be grouped 
and placed in front of or behind 
other graphics or text. You can al- 
so import bitmap graphics in 20 
formats, thanks to DeScribe's li- 
censed HiJaak technology. Text 
import and export are flexible as 
well, with almost 60 different for- 
mats supported. Most DOS word 
processors and spreadsheets 
are supported, but the only Win- 
dows formats included are Ami 
Pro and Excel. You'll have to use 
DDE or Microsoft Rich Text For- 
mat to transfer formatted data to 
other Windows programs. 

For any question not covered 
in one of the exemplary manuals, 
the company provides 90 days of 
free technical support. After that, 



iSwIFTTIWESCraHEajATAlCOMPUTF" 



» File Edit Se«M:h Sjyli! Snell Oblcias Qnw UIHHIeii Qplloiis WiihI' 



il..||, 



DeScribe incorporatcT u powerful drawing package. Here is anexEunpIc 
of wltal yoii call do with tlic fools provided: 




hiW crtly. page i. 



DeScribe lets you import bitmap graphics in 20 formats. 



Although 

We Carry A 

Variety Of 

Products, 

We Only Offer 




matter what you buy from us, you won't have 
to worry. Because at Universal, we only stock 
the most reliable products in the industry. 

That's why, we can offer a 5 year warranty with a 30 
day, money back guarantee on every product. 

Plus, everything you buy is guaranteed to be 
compatible with your computer. Because when you call 
to order, our sales service department will help you 
figure out exactly what you need. They're knowledgeable 
about every product. So they'll be there for you every 
step of the way. 

And just to make sure nothing is overlooked, we also 
check every product for quality before it's shipped. After 
that, it's sent to you anyway you like. ^^ 

So if you want to upgrade your 
computer, use Universal. Because ^^ 



everyone who orders a product 
from us, gets the same thing. 



EXPANS ON BOARDS 



Orchid Technology 

Raraquea 16/32 

OKS229 2MBS329 

2-8MB for PS/2 f)0/fir>/60/70/80 

RamqiK-si 8/ 16 OK $ m 2MB S245 

BOCA Research 

BocaramAl Plus 

OKSI192MBSi992-aMBUM4.0Ars 
Bocarara2 for PS/2'sOKSI59 2MB $219 
BocaramXT-PS/230IMBS159 

AST Research 

Rampage Hus 2»fi OK S189 2MB S289 
up 10 8MB for AT UM 4.0 
fet™i2861MBS279 
Qip)d32 0KS250 



VIDEO GRAPH CS CARDS 



ATI 

a^M Ultra 1MB PS/2 or 1&\ BLIS $449 
GrajAics Ultra 1 MB & moua.' $549 
&^tiics\inlaeew/lMBS389 
N™!!VGAStet«)XLw/IMBS3B 
VCA Wonder XI, I MB */mouse S239 

Orchid Technology 

Pahrtnhcit I2HQ w/IMB & Sierra S37i) 
Prodesigner IIS SI2KSm 1MB S2I9 
Prodcsigner II MC for PS/2 I MB $3*) 

BOCA Research 

BOCJ\ Super VGA ,il2KSI39 IMBS179 



PRINTER UPGRADES 



Hewlett Packard 

laieriftllRlll.lliD. HIP 
IMBS69 2MBSII9 4MBS199 
Lasffja II. IID 
IMBS89 2MBS1194MBSI99 



Panasonic 4420 & 44501 

1MBS109 2MBSI29 4MBS229 
4450 1MB 51794455 2MB $269 

Epson EPL 6000 &EPL 7000 

1MB S129 2MB $145 4MB 523") 

IBM 4019 & 4019E 

lMBSur)2MBS139 3.nMBSI99 

OKI 400, 800, 820, 830, 840 

1MB 5119 2MB 5169 4MB SI99 

Canon 

LBP4 2MBS209IJJP82MB$119 



MEMORY CH PS & MODULES 



DRAM 

IXI-70NSS4.95 2.56X4-80NSS4.99 
lXI-80NS$4.50 256.X-l-ltKI>SS4,95 
2r)6X1-80NS 51.99 256XI-l2flNS 51.75 
256X1-100NS SI.83 2"ifiXl-150NS $1.50 
64X4-80>SS3.00 64X1-IOONS51.75 
64X4-100NS 52.75 (XXI-I2(INS 51.60 

SIMM/SIPP Modules 

4X9-70NSSI694X9«INSS159 
IX9.70NS$42 1XSW0$41 
IX9-100NS 540 



MATH CO-PROCESSORS 



IIT 

USffiC87-l6.-25.-20&-33S169 
US83C£l-16EKSII5-20SXSI29 
Nto' US83C87-40 5199 

Intel 

80387-16. -20. -25 & -33 $239 
80387-16S.XS139 -203X3189 
80287-10 375 80287XL 399 







IBM PS/2 UPGRADES ■ LAPTOP UPGRADES 



IBM P$/2 Memory 

6450604 2MB MOD 50Z, KiSX, 70 399 
6450606 2MB NtOD70A2IS! 19 
34F2g33& 77 4MB PS/2 SIMM 5199 
6450129 8MB SIMM 5564 
30^60 2MB for 30-286 599 
6450128 4MB MOD 90 & 95 $219 
64509(12 2MB MOD 90 & 95 5 129 
6450609 2^MB MOD 50. 50Z. 60 S298 

6450605 2-aMB MOD 70 & 80 S350 
3.ira077 2-l4MBMOD7Q&80 
W/2MB 5298 

34ra0ll4-16MBMOD7O&f» 
W/4MB5429 

PS/2 Hard Drives 

ZcfoSI«lfor50.50Z 

52MB $395 80MB SJ95 105MB 5599 

124MB for 55SX. 70 3740 240MB 5999 

200MB 31065 

124MB MDL 55S^, 70 5740 200MB $1065 

Processor Upgrades 
by Kingston 

IBM PS/2 50. 60, 50Z, 30/286. 25/286. 
AT. ,\T/2e6. AST Ppfmium/Bravo 286, 
Compaq Ds^pro 286. Fbrtabie 111. HP 
fetra B/12, ES/a NEC ftvrerMate 
286+, ?MMe +. Epson 286: 20MHZ for 
5341 25MHZ lor S4I9 



COMPAQ UPGRADES 



Compaq Deskpro 

Dcskpra 386/20. 25. 20E, 25E & 386S 
4MB Module S229 4MB expboard 3327 
Itekpro 386/33 486/25 Sjaanpro 
2MBMixluleS149fisoctoap. brd. 
W/2MB $395 

1/3 height floppy disk drives 

1.44MB S129 1.2MB S139 

Portables 

LIE 286 1MB 3S9 2MB 3168 4MB $449 

l,Tt;386S/20IMBS2094MB$399 

386/20 1MB Upgrade til 5145 

4MB cjtp/cxl M $375 

SLT 286 1MB $119 4MB 5429 

8LT 386 1MB 3 129 2MB $255 

4MBS435 



Toshiba 

T1200XE/SE, T 1600. 131001;. 'RIOOGX. 
raOOSX. 15100. T520O.2MBS1!2 
T3200SXC 2MB S159 4MB 3329 
TlOOOSE/XE/LE&raXIOSX !MB$H9 
2MB S229 

T!000!£&'I200CSX4MB$419 
■raiOCSX.ra]OSX4MBS229 
13200 3MB S2fFl 

Megahertz Laptop Modems 

2400 BDinU;rralS149w/MNPf: 5210 
2400/9000 F'AX/Modcm w/M\P5 5319 



NEC UPGRADES 



FbMnMtE SX 2MB $395 4MB 3575 

Ftawmale SX Hus 2MB 3299 4MB $525 

Pi»eni)aicSX/20 

2MB CPU $189 

2MB EXP 3235 

Powemiale 386/ 

20/25 2MB 5325 

8MB $799 



800/899-8518 



UNIViRSAL 



nEMOBT PRODUCTS 



UNIVERSAL MEMORY PRODUCTS 15451 Redhill. Suite E, 

Tustin, CA 92680 D Phone: 7I4/2S8-20I8 Fax: 714/258-2818 

Houra M • F 6:30 - 5:00 SAT SflO - ZKX) PST 



ZENITH 
UPGRADES 



7.386/20/25/33 
niid33l':iMBS64 
4MBS219 
Maslcrsl^SU 
3^SX 2MB 5199 
SlimsFtel/ 
SuperSpoit, SX. 
286ES159 
TurbaSport 386, 
3861': 1MB 3149 
4 MB 5495 

Same 6sf 
shipping by 
UPS, Federal 
Express or 
DHL Order 
worldwide by 
K>.. C.O.D.. 
APO, FPO & 
credit cand 
with no 
surcharge 
added. 20% 
restocking fee 
□n all non- 
defective 



£a^ 



ORCHID 



BmMzl 



^EVEREX- 



raKiMUsM 



MfeMegaherte 

/isr 



p 



VtSA (^^^^ 



CIrda Reader Service Number 195 



TEST LAB 




plan to pay $95 per year or $10 
for the first ttiree minutes and $1 
per minute after thiat to get your 
questions answered. Thie compa- 
ny also hias a support BBS. 

If you can live withi DeScribe's 
user-interface oddities, you'll find 
it a capable and powerful word 
processor. Altfiough it lacks some 
features, sucfi as automatic foot- 
notes and a draft mode, its superi- 
or object-oriented page-layout 
capabilities make it an excellent 
choice for tfnose needing a word 
processor witfi desktop publisfiing 
capabilities. 

DENNY ATK IN 

Circle Reader Service Number 305 

MICROSOFT WORD 
FOR WINDOWS 2.0 

In Windows-land, Microsoft Word 
for Windows has always been the 
word processor to beat. With Ami 
Pro 2.0 and WordPerfect 5.1 for 
Windows, the competition's hotter, 
but for my money. Word for Win- 
dows 2.0 is still king of the hill. 

WinWord 1.1 was a solid word 
processor that introduced a fea- 
ture that was to become the most 
imitated interface element in the 
Windows world — the toolbar. 
With version 2.0 of WinWord, tvli- 
crosoft has taken the toolbar and 
dramatically extended it to in- 
clude a full row of buttons for the 
most common tasks. 

■$129 for previous users of Word for Win- 
flows and for competitive upgrades. 

24 COMPUTE JULY 1992 



Microson Word lor Wiadows Z.0 
IBM PC and compatibles (BQ286 or 
laster), 2MB RAM, EGA or higher 
graphics, 5MB free hard disk space 
(15MB for ail options); mouse 
recommended— S495' 

MICROSOFT 

One Microsoft Way 

Redmond, WA 98052-8339 

(800) 426-9400 

(206) 882-8080 



Since the features accessed 
by the toolbar are at the heart of 
WinWord, let's take a quick 
toolbar tour. Going from left to 
right, you'll find buttons for open- 
ing and saving files; cutting, cop- 
ying, and pasting; undoing; cre- 
ating numbered and bulleted 
lists; building tables; creating 
frames; drawing (WinWord has 
an on-board drawing program); 
graphing; printing envelopes: 
checking your spelling; printing; 
and zooming between full-page 
and 100-percent views. 

Almost better I han these new but- 
tons is the fact that you can add 
your own. You can map any native 
WinWord command or any macro 
you've created to a button. Here's 
a simple example of a button I've 



added to WinWord's toolbar. 

I found that I spent a lot of time 
either typing the date in docu- 
ments or going through WinWord's 
menus to insert the current date. 
I decided it would be nice to have 
a button on the toolbar for this 
chore. First, I created a macro to 
insert the date using the following 
keystrokes: Alt-I, T, Down Arrow, 
Down Arrow, Enter, Next, I double- 
clicked on the toolbar to bring up 
the options dialog. I selected my 
insert-date macro's name, indicat- 
ed where on the toolbar I wanted 
my button, and chose a button de- 
sign from the list of those available. 
I clicked on Change, and my new 
button was on the toolbar. That's 
all there was to it. 

Looking beyond WinWord's 
new buttons, you'll find that the rib- 
bon and ruler, familiar from Win- 
Word 1.0, are present in 2.0 but 
they're combined. The ribbon 
sports drop-down list boxes for 
styles, fonts, and font sizes, plus 
buttons for styles (bold, italic, and 
underline), justification (left, cen- 
ter, right, and proportional), and 
tab settings (left, right, center, 
and decimal), as well as a button 
to turn paragraph marks on or off. 

With 2.0, you can double-click 
on each of these elements to call 



3 ^^ ^ ~- Micjflsilll Won! ■ Diicilmfir^j^ ^ 

^ lili: I'lliV Vii-w lii-;rrl iorifiai liiiih^ I.iiiir " V/iiiiliiv/ lli:l|i 



H.iiin,.i Iftlfrn.. ni»n li±l fi" Ijj] ITITITI |tT*[an"B1 j litl i| t| |Tj 



i-.._i.uuo:.: 
lili;;imtl:;'i 
I'oiiUnil. ijp. 



:.■■•! Kelly 

'Mndo-.v, ir.-k.j 
^%'cTd for '."'il:': 
!,;i.-i..M:iii:iii.;T 



Create Envelone 



Aililitiiit:<l .Ifi 



KullV Hvi^i^ijri 

xr/i;iiiiKii.iiiiiii 

1311 Smilh y.t 
I'orll.ind. im :>/■/]}. 



\ Erinl Enyolopp j 
I CancBl I 



fidnk M4Hiin<)1cir^ 
Alliiinuy III t.MM 

?su/ hi; :!3iiI 

I'liKl.mrl. nil 'J/I7.T 



Ervvelppc S'^tf 



CtPtiif e.sch tmi^rjfji face lip In y«ii pYntei"; 



tnchidei f^otut ei thai a e H'Aly j»:c^s'-ilil^ md which h-jlj.' :iLe 
ilocument:. The ptodua iho br. ?ii;af io:ili iot tii!km ; ii 
)<een Me lo produce looks (ibulon 



Miin.iii:h li y/ll « / tl in| 

siii! 'J |:i r/n « ii /m m] 

Silc II |4 K n 1li;i/[lin| 
Sue 1214 »» II ir>| 
DL|]inililnx22l)n>in| 
C5 11G2inin k J^'Jniiiil 
Cehl4 K 1G?nini| 
CEQIIUK^^^tanii 
llalianlllQiiaJlliiiml 







Printing envelopes is a snap with Wbrd for Windows 2.0. 



SOFTWARE HEADQUARTERS MK^lOl 

A wide selection ofsofiware and accessories for the IBM and Macintosh ^ ' -^-^^^^^iilk^^^ ^ 



Specialists in International Saks • Competitive Pricing • Same day shipping 






GAMES 



ess Attack Sub Comtio 25 

A.T-P- Flight Comiiafider 37 

jHces 0l the PacHic 43 



Genghis KJian 37 

Geojigsa*..--,, 37 

Geitysburg.The Turning Point 39 

G/o*a/ CmKiuest 37 

Gunship 2000 VOA 42 



Sailing Simulator m 

* ori J Class system from Dolphin Mari,,, 
^>""'" w, 



Adi/entures of Willie Beamish ....43 

Allied Fofces Bundle 42 

tacient An of War 31 

Ancent Art oi War at Sea .,..31 

Arachnopiiodia...- 19 

Arachnoptiobia w/Sountf SouTCe2? 

Are We There ret? 20 

Amttjr Alley 29 

B.A.T 20 

Bandit Kings of Ancienl China....37 

Bane of the Cosmic Forge 37 

Bartie Fashion 4 Desijn 27 

Bard's Tale Conslfuclion Set 34 

Bard's Tale III 31 

Bart Simpson Arcade Game 32 

Bart Simpson's House of 

Weird ness 32 

Baseball Card Collector 22 

Battle Chess 32 

Battle Chess It 32 

Battle Command 27 

Battle Isle 33 

BatceHawiiS 1942/Fnesi hour.43 | 

aiiiiknej 32 

Bloodwyeh..- 27 

Hues BtoOan 32 

Breach 2 22 

Bridge 6.0 26 

Bush Buck Adsentures 32 

Cao'aih Comjc II 17 

Cat SiOlivtl 40 

CarrferSWJie 43 

Carrtefs at Wai. 34 

Castles 37 

Ctiamplons ......37 

Champions of Krynn 23 

Chuck Yeager's Air Combat 40 

Civlliialioh 43 

Command HQ 37 

Conah the Cimmerian 32 

Connict In Kwee 37 

ConaictiMidOie East 37 

Conquest of Longbow .....43 

Cor^ratioh 32 

Crrw's ir] tfte Krem/fn 37 

Crusaders of Vk Dark £avsirt...42 

Baiklands 43 

Death Unighis of Kunn 23 

Denioniek 32 



Hare Raising Havoc 27 

Hare Raising/Sound Source 32 

Harpoon 30 

Harpoon BattleSet «2or3 21 

Harpoon BattleSei » 4 25 

Haipooh Challenges Pai^ d6 

Harpoon Scenano Editor 28 

Heart of China 37 

WenjM irf Bio 35?Wl 34 

Home Alone 27 

HoverForce 32 



Wiclvey's Memory Challenge 22 

Wight 4 Pifaeic 3 40 

Millenium 27 

Mission Impossible ...32 

Mixed Up Fairy Tales 32 

Murder 30 

Ninja Gaiden 2 20 

No Greater Glory 37 

Nobunaga's Ajttbition II 37 

Nova9 25 

Obitus 39 

Oh to! More Lemmings! 22 

Oil Baron 27 

OuJoftWsWorid 37 

Operation CO f.1-BAT 25 

Paperboy 2 29 

Paiton stnlies Back 37 

Perfect General 37 

Perfect General Scenario 25 

PMeiittr 25 

Plmet'iE^e 40 

Plajioom 29 

Police Quest 3 37 

Pools of Darkness 40 

Populous 24 

Powemwrtfer 34 

Prehistonk 32 

Pnnce ot Persia 27 

Railroad Tycoon ,...,34 

ffjnpart 29 

Red Baron EGA or VGA 37 

Riders of Rohan 32 

Rise of the Dragon 37 



Hoyle's Book of Games 1 or 2. ..25 

HoylesBock of Games 3 , 32 

/rrtffana .fonea.-Fafe ofAilmiis ,.40 
Indy JDnes:Last Crusade VGA ,,,,29 

Ishido' 34 

James Bond 007;Stealth Affair .36 

Jetnghteril 42 

Kampfgrupae 37 

mngClimt 32 

Kings Quest V 38 

Knights of the Sky 37 

/((Mfia/1 Conjp/iacjr 34 

L' Empereur 37 

Laffer Utililies 25 

Laiul, SeaAlt liihgsi 43 

Lealftef Gotfdessea Pfrotes 2 ...43 

Leisure Urryl VGA 37 

Leisure Larry 3...., , 37 

Leisure Larry 5 37 

Lemmings., ,....„..„„„.„..„34 

Les Manley-Losi in L.A 25 

Lenicross 30 




RoboSfor; 37 

Rocketeer «i/ Sound Source 32 

Rocketeer.-The Wovie 22 

Roller Coaster Construction Set. 32 
Roller Coaster/Sound Source....43 

ffiillert)at«s 27 

Romance of Three Kingdoms 2. .43 

Rommel, , 35 

Rules of Engagement 39 

SwgmS..:. 32 

Savage Empire 37 

Scrabble Deluse 32 

Sea Rogue 32 

Search for the King 27 

Secret of Monkey Island EGA 23 

Secret of Monkey Island II.. 40 

Secret of Monkey Island VGA 2S 

Secret Weapon Mssion Disk 2. .22 
Secret Weapons Mission Dsk 1,22 

Secret Weapons of Luftwaffe 44 

Second Front , , 37 

Shadow of the Sorcerer 33 

Shanghai 2:Dragon's Eye 32 

Sharif on Bridge ,37 

Shuttle Space Fight Simulator ..37 

Siege 40 

Silent Service II 37 

Sim Ant 37 

Sim City 30 

Sim City for Windows 37 

Sim City GraphiciAncient Cille5..24 
Sim City Graphlc:Future Cities ..,24 



am City Terrain Editor 19 

Sim Earth 41 

am Earth for Windows..,., ....,...,43 

Sleeping Gods Lie 32 

Space Ace 2; Borf s Revenge ,..,37 

Space Ace 37 

SoaceOuestJ 37 




TL ,A''''"^ronjxJnc. 
l.^cncu.M„Lircisar)600bpsf„/2^00| 

i'uc.5 .1IC \X mdoivs supporr, \?'T7'| WYF 1 
■"I'lxrri .ind porrahili.y. f ji bs comrrund 

l'«.«nd and r.||b,ctround send and 
rc«i«. Unit also has muJdpJc phone dlrn:. f 
lor,rs,broadcas,,d%cd«ndanda„^ 
mairc cover letter, IncrMihIc Pockcr Siz 
5249. 



Space Wrecked 32 

Si>e«)tiSlT2 27 

Spellcasting 101 37 

Spellcasling201 ...43 

Spint of Eicalibur 32 

Stanford Wong's Videb Paher ...32 

Slat Control 3: 

Star Trek 251h Anniversary 37 

SlarflightS , 22 

Stratego 32 , 

Strike Commattder 47 I 

Strip Pokers 33 

Stunts 32 

Super Jeopardy 27 j 

Super Space Imader3 27 I 

Super Telns 32 I 

Swap 32 1 

Teles Of Me0c 40 

Team Yankee 37 

Tenninator , , ,34 

TestDfivea 35 

Tetns 24 

7>ie GaUsther 32 

The Immortal 22 

Thunderhawk 32 

TmeQuest 37 

7ofi GdfrtOanger Zone 32 

Tracon 2 for Windows 47 

Tracon 2;Air Traffic Conlrol1er....43 
rreasuratttfSsvagefnmlter....34 



ToJmp Castle 2 32 

TurtlesiArcade Game 32 

Turtfes:Manhatt an Missions 32 

Tmlight 2000 VGA 37 

LIlimaB 40 

LItimaT 47 

Ullmi-.Styglan Alifsa 47 

Lltima Trilogy 37 

Ultlmamogf2 47 

vm II Plaint aitor 32 

LMS II: Nations at War 37 

Incharted Waters .,.,. 43 



[)esign Vour Own Railroad 37 

Dick Tracy Pnnt Kit..., 17 

Dick Tracy w/ Sound Source......27 

Dog Eat Dog World 32 

Dog Eal Dog/Sound Source 43 

Dragon Wars 32 

Dragon's Lair II: Timewarp 43 

Dragon's Lair: Singe's Castle .,,.37 

Duck TalesiQuest for Gold 19 

EltoPlus ,.. 29 

Elvira 34 ■ 

Elvira IhJawsofCerherus 40 

Eye of the Beholder 2 40 

f.l5 II Scenano Dsk 20 

F-15 Stnke Eagle II 34 

F-19 Stealth Fighter 43 

F29 Relaliator 33 

Falcon 3-0 .,- 47 

Ramesirffreeito)) 32 

Rigit of the Intrucier 37 

FreeD.C 37 

Games PBople Play 29 

Gateway to Savage Frontier 33 



WXAttackChopper 28 

Uberty or Death 37 

Life & Death 24 

Lfe 4 Death IkThe Brain 27 

Ugmconfdor 32 

Ugbt Quest 34 

Loom 23 

Lord of the Rings 34 

Lord of tiK Rings II 37 

Lost Admiral ., 37 

^ost Treasures eflnhcom 43 

Mac Arthur's War 32 

Magic Candle 2 40 

Mairtfs:Eiperfrnenta(fl{Mw....37 

Matni Cubed 34 

Medieval Lords 39 

MegaFoitress: Flight of Old Dog.40 
M^FonressrMission Disk 2 ....27 

MegaTtavelierll 37 

Mickey 4 (Minnie's Phnt Kit 17 

Mickey's Crossword Puzzle ,.22 

Mickey's Jigsaw Puzzle 32 



Valine 28 

Vengeance of Ewallbw 22 

Vette 33 

Volfied J!7 

Warlords 29 

Western Front „ .,..,,37 

Wheel 0' Fortune w/ Vanna .......27 

Where Amen'ca'S Past Cannen ,.37 

Where in Europe is Carmen 32 

Where in Time is Carmen 32 

Where in USA IS Carmen 32 

Where in World is Cannen., 32 

Where in World is Camten VGA ..48 

iVhile Death 32 

WlUWheela .34 

Wing 2 Special Operations 1 27 

Wing 2 Special Operations 2 27 

WlngComm Mission Disk 1 22 

WIngComm Missions Dish 2 22 

Wng Commander 2 47 

Wing Commander 2 Speech Pakl7 

Wing Commander,... 39 

WhgCommntleiOeliixe 47 

WordTns 30 

Worlds at War 32 

Wrath ollhe E)emon 33 





I True Hands On Stick & Throttle 1^ i„L ' 

compaiibtewith- 

., o;/"™ 3'° "f'S^! Simulator IV. 

H9 Stealth. Wing Commander II and more 

Weapons Conirai Systems 

or Flight Control System 

S89, Weapons Control 
S69, Right Control 

I^TMBUSTMASTERt 



Call us and use your MC, visa or Discover 

800-999-7995 

In NY State 212-962-7168 

Fax 212-962-7263 

Methods of Payment: We accept Visa, MC, Discover Card & 

Money orders. Personal checks allow 14 days to clear. 

School. State & City purchase orders accepted. 

Shipping: UPS Ground (S5 mm)/ Airborne Express(S7mm) 

APO&FPO( $6)/CANADA, HI. AK & PR (Airborne $12). 

Overseas minimum S30 shipping (please fax orders) 

m residents add 8.25% Sales Tax. 
Send money orders or checks to: MISSION CONTROL, 
43 Warren St., Dept. COM 692, New Yofk, NY 10007 

Please send S2.00 for catalogue (free with order) 
Overseas & Militaiy Orders given special attention! 



circle Reader Service Number 174 



4DBo«ing 22 

ABC'S Wide World of Boxmg 32 

ABC Spons Wimer rSanws- 34 

All Amencan College Football ....37 

Aralretli's Racmg Challenge 22 

Bill Elliot's Nascar Challenge 32 

Bo Jackson Basehail 32 

Caliromia Games II 27 

Car«DfJn9f 40 

Celtic Legend) 34 

Days of Thjnder,,, , ,..,,25 

Dream Team 32 

GamesWinter Challenge 35 

HanilgflS ..,.37 

Jack NickiausGoir Unlimited ....37 

Jack Hlcklaus:Slgi!etun M. 43 

Jimmy Connors Pro Tennis 33 

Links: The Challenge of Gol' 37 

Links: Bayhill Course Dish 18 

ijnks:Bi!untiful Course Disk IS 

lJnks:I>orado Beach Course IS 

Unks:Frestone Course Disk 18 

Links: Barton Creek Course.., ....18 
Manage''s Challenge Baseball ..31 

Microleague Football Delune 42 

Mitie Diiha Football 34 

I^ICM:Road to Final four 35 

NFL Pro League Football 47 

Over the NetiVolleyball 25 

Personal Pro Golf 27 

PGA Commemorabve Edition 46 

PGA Course Disk 19 

PGA Tour Golf 32 

Playmai^er Football 32 

Pro Football Analyst 37 

TeamSuTuk: 27 

Tony La Russa AL Siadium 15 

Tony La Russa Teams 1901,68 15 

Tony La Russa r^L Stadium 15 

Tony La Russa Baseball 32 

We aier Baseball 2 32 

Wayne Gretzky Hockey 2 34 

Wajne Greul(y2 :Cana(la's Cup 35 

Hockey League Simulator 2G 

WoflU Class Soccer , ,...27 

Algeblaster Plus .„ , 32 

Challenge of Ancient Empire ....32 

Donald's Alphabet Chase 14 

Geo Jigsaw 27 

Goofy's Railway Express 14 

Grammar Gremlins , ,,...32 

Headline Hany EGA 32 

Headline Harry VGA 37 

KidPn ....37 

Math B aster Mystery 32 

Math Easier Plus 32 

Math Rabbit,,,,,.. 27 

Mickey's 123 27 

Mickey's ABC 27 

Mickey's Colors i Shapes 27 

Mickey's Runaway Zoo 14 

Midnight Rescue 32 

Nigel's World 32 



Spell II Plus Taking 32 

Super Spellicopter 27 

Super Munchers , 32 

Think Quick 32 

Treasure Mountain 32 

TreeHouse 37 

What's My Angle 32 

Word Munches 32 

Writer Rabbit 32 

Writing/Publishing Centef 42 

Advanced Mail Ust 32 

Animation studio.., , ,..79 

AccuWeather 34 

AuloMap 57 

Bannemiania 25 

BodyWortis 47 

Dream House Professional 48 

D\'orak on T)-ping 32 

Dvorak's Top 30 .,.37 

Floor Plan 32 

RoorPlanPlus 47 

Estimatof Plus 49 

J.K. Lasser's Income Tax 47 

Legal Letter Works „47 

Letter Works 47 

Lottery Gold 32 

Mavis Beacon 2 Windows 40 

Mavis Beacon Typing 2 34 

Orbits 37 

Pacioli20QO 29 

PrintshopNew 38 

Sales Letter Works 47 

Speed Reader for Windows 32 

U.S.Atlas 39 

U.S. Atlas tor V/indows.. 54 

Ad Lib Card [Woo Channel) ,,.,139 

Ad Ub Gold WW 199 

Sound Blastef 129 

Sound Blaster Pro 209 

Gamepon Auto CH Products 34 

Gamepott (MicroChannl) by CH .48 

2400 baud Intemal Modem 69 

240O baud External Modem 79 

Icontioiler for PC 49 

Icont/oiler for Laptops 69 

Computer Vacuum i^it ...25 

Computer Cleaning & Vacuum . ..35 

Flight Stick by CH Products 42 

G Force Yoke 49 

Gravis Joystick for PC 39 

Mach III by CH Products 33 

WedIn 24 

Not responsible for Iytȣr3piiic4ll 
efnjrs.Cfifidicom(al^litybefwEOfd£riJi5. 
All Sales Fifal. Prices subject to c^ai^fte 
■rrirKNArwtiGS. No retunu aiU ttc credited 
wflhout a Retl^ luUiomation NumW. 



TEST LAB 



important dialogs. For example, 
double-click on the ruler, and you'll 
pull up the paragraph style dialog 
box. If you double-click on the rib- 
bon, you'll get WinWord's charac- 
ter-formatting dialog box. And if 
you double-click on the toolbar, 
you'll find yourself in WinWord's Op- 
tion module, where you change but- 
tons and keyboard assignments, 
among other things. 

As you may have gathered 
from the description of the but- 
tons, there's more to WinWord 
than just an improved interface — 
there's a boatload of new fea- 
tures. I'll touch on some of the 
most important. 

For desktop publishing, this ver- 
sion of WinWord has frames. A 
frame is simply a way of unifying 
a graphic or a region of text so it 
can be moved. And moving 
frames is easy with WinWord's 
new drag-and-drop capability. To 
move a frame, select it, click the 
mouse on it, and drag it to its des- 
tination. (Drag and drop works 
with any WinWord object and is 
not limited to frames.) 

Another great DTP feature is 
text rotation, which lets you alter 
the angle at which text appears. 

Desktop publishing features are 
exciting, but those of us using a 
word processor for day-to-day 
tasks will be glad to find some im- 
pressive business muscle in Win- 
Word. At the top of the list is enve- 
lope printing. For a year, I've been 
debating whether to get a dedicat- 
ed label printer, but this feature is 
so nice that I've decided that Win- 
Word and my printer are all I 
need. To print an envelope, all you 
do is click on the Envelope button 
and put an envelope in your print- 
er. If you have an inside address 
in your letter, WinWord will find it 
and supply it in the dialog box. If 
there's no inside address, you sim- 
ply type it in. This may seem like 
a small feature, but it's one that 
will save you hours every month. 

As you'd expect with any top- 
of-the-line word processor, Win- 
Word comes with an on-board 
spelling checker and thesaurus, 

26 COMPUTE JULY 1992 



WordPerfect 5.1 for Windows 
tBM PC and compatibles {80286 or 
taster, 80386 or faster recom- 
mended), 2MB I^AIVI (4MB strongly 
recommended), hard drive— $495 

WORDPERFECT 
1555N. Tectinotogy Way 
Orem, UT 84057 
(800) 451-5151 



but what's new in 2.0 is a gram- 
mar checker. Most writers will get 
at least some useful advice from 
this tool. 

Other features that bear men- 
tioning include topflight file con- 
version, superior help for WordPer- 
fect users, excellent print merge, 
and a first-rate tutorial. When you 
come down to the bottom line, Win- 
Word is hard to beat. It's done eve- 
rything I've asked of it and more. 
I unreservedly recommend it. 

CLIFTON KAflr^JES 

circle Reader Service Numtier 306 

WORDPERFECTS.] 
FOR WINDOWS 

WordPerfect has entered the Win- 
dows word-processing arena, and 
pundits wait with bated breath to 
see whether it will be a success. 

Unlike WordPerfect's entry in- 
to the fvlac, Amiga, and ST envi- 
ronments, this release comes at 
the tail end of a pack of serious 
contenders. It's identified as 5.1 
(probably to get an edge on the 
2.0s and 1 .Os on the market), and 
it's very much analogous to the lat- 
est DOS version, with the advan- 
tages of a graphic interface. The 
major complaint about the DOS 
version has been the length of 
time it takes to learn the simplest 
of tasks. Just setting the margins 
or defining a page layout takes 
several keypresses, and the log- 
ic of the menu system is enough 
to try any new user's patience. 

WordPerfect 5.1 for Windows 
is a piece of cake to use. Ironical- 
ly, the people who'll probably 
have the most trouble adapting to 



WordPerfect 



\i UiluilMs 



L._ 







it will be those poor souls who've 
already invested months and 
years of effort into learning the 
DOS version. For them, WordPer- 
fect has provided a keyboard over- 
lay that reminds you a little of the 
command structure of the DOS 
version, but no matter what you 
do, the rules in Windows are dif- 
ferent from the rules in DOS, 

If you have a large collection 
of macros from WordPerfect 5.1 
for DOS, you can convert them 
with a handy conversion utility, 
though some of them won't be 
usable. But you might need few- 
er macros because the com- 
mands are so much handier in 
the current version. Also, the mac- 
ro language has been complete- 
ly redone, making writing a mac- 
ro much easier. You can write 
your macro right in the main edit- 
ing screen and call it up for edit- 
ing anytime. WordPerfect for Win- 
dows has a rich macro language 
that provides means to create 
your own dialog boxes and men- 
us, though in my opinion Ami Pro 
2.0 does an even better job in 
both of these areas, 

WordPerfect also provides a 
file manager that allows you to 
leave behind the superawkward 
file handler of Windows 3.0 and 
the merely awkward file handler 
of Windows 3,1. However, if 
you've ever used a truly effective 
file handler like the ones offered 
for fvlacintosh or in GeoWorks En- 
semble, you'll look at this collec- 
tion of file managers {including 
WordPerfect's) and wonder why 




Satisfy 
your curiosity 

for only $595* 




FINANCIAL 
MARKETS 



Stay on top of current events, 
business trends, sports, ttie 
weather, and the world of 
entertainment with USA TODAYS 



Your entire tamily wilt benefit 
from the complete, regularly 
updated Academic American 
Encyclopedia from Groiier's^ 



&1I 11 



Keep up-to-date with stocl( 
market quotations on financial 
Mariiet Quotations. Also checl< 
commodities, currencies, options, 
and bonds. 




«MSY 
SABRE 



(S) 



R praduct- at SHSHE Trj^fcH Infomtfion Ketworh 



American Airline's EAASY SABRE"^ 
reservation system lets you shop 
for the best fares and make your 
flight, hotel and car reservations 
online. With EAASY SABRE you 
can plan every business trip and 
family vacation with ease and 
efficiency 



No matter what you're interested in, satisfy your 
curiosity about the world and the people in it with the 
National Videotex Network. Easy to use, with high 
resolution graphics, and an even better-looking price. 
And the National Videotex Network features AT&T's 
state of the art digital network. 

For just $5.95 a month, the National \'ideotex 
Network gives you unlimited access 24 hours a day to 
over 80 basic services including news, sports, 
financial information, games, entertainment, 
education, and so much more. And on the National 
Videotex Network's MAIL ser\ace, you get 60 free 



messages a month, with additional messages costing 
only 20? each. 

And only the National Videotex Network offers 
Let's CHAT USA": You'll experience "real-time" 
conversation on our exclusive, premium service 
where you can meet and talk with hundreds of people 
throughout the country'. 

For only $5.95 a month, there's no reason not to 
satisfy your curiosity with the National Videotex 
Network. Call now and receive your software 
absolutely free. 



800-336-9096 



ART 



•Basic Packiigo piicc of SS.^S a month do« iioi include premium semccs. rrict and scnto conlml ivb'fxt [o chaiiBt, Sonic Icdlurw snblca 
D Hirtliargc. Coninxl lime for premium services wiil be billed al S9-00/houi Sam-6pm. S6,00/liour opm-eam wcekdaj's. (tOO/hour all 
ijay Samiday and Sunday. Cental Standsni time. Kaiional Wdrntcx is a pending mart of Nalionai Videoicx NcnvoTk Corp. All Olhcis art 
for identifvcation puiposts only and belong to their respective contp^nie$ or organizations. 



NATIONAL 
VIDEOTEX 



TEST LAB 



they can't be better. I know I do. 

As for object linking, WordPer- 
fect doesn't have it yet, Microsoft 
Word for Windows 2.0 just got it, 
and Ami Pro has always had it. 
WordPerfect supports DDE, how- 
ever, so it's not completely link- 
less, and it features a handy 
spreadsheet importer that will con- 
vert the most common spread- 
sheet formats into a WordPerfect 
table for insertion into text, 

WordPerfect doesn't handle 
frames (or boxes, in WordPerfect 
parlance) as well as Ami Pro, or 
even as well as Word (though the 
boxes appear to be more reliable 
and leakproof than Word's 
frames). Rather than letting you 



an important part of your publica- 
tion, you should consider Ami Pro 
over Word or WordPerfect in their 
current releases. 

Another drawback for many 
users will be WordPerfect's vora- 
cious appetite for RAM. I attempt- 
ed running it on two machines 
with only 2MB. The 80386 ma- 
chine simply crashed at regular 
intervals. When 1 ran the program 
on an 80286, it was more insidi- 
ous and would begin failing in un- 
predictable ways before eventu- 
ally dying. On an 80386 with 4MB, 
its performance was flawless. The 
lesson is clear; If you have less 
than 4MB, beef up before install- 
ing WordPerfect. It will save hours 



WordPeried - [c:\waik\seeclesr - unmodinedl 



File Ri!il Vii:v/ I uyuul J.oolf; I [ii>t firiipliicG Miicni y/im\iiw [Julp 






Open 



Save 






■.la I- SMCh I 



FFFF 
Fcni - 



IZl 



Seems (Jlearlv Now 



PrapocHl Summary. As we 
susp-ifC'ed ofli'tjiium opeta- 
iions ]fi boti-i produciion and 
merl- elirtj hove a ctsiermmonf 
eneciotitiow\*i£li DU' monne 
end Ire^^fiter nsh operations 
peflojm Acompeiotrs/esrudy 
ol the rwo financial hisioties 
showed If I at out levenuei 
lollowed the some fiscal pet- 
lein as thai of Clea^lv Aqueri- 
O/zt' w,xy on^ie^king ums;when aquatigmsales Sfe 

iiiun m^Jildm/'s ^^^^^ ,eierior.sh.p also ha. ^ 




ForifeCoutff12W 



vofaiite limes isnsf-'/ lu 
theielumsloruson .itn 
equoriurn veriiuie 'mI! 
esieniioitybe guftr?fit.-. 
everyone wlrobuyt ot : 
will ha^-e io have soifrc- 
¥*tt@relopu)1hem and 
everyone who b'jy3 ^n 

Beryl Productioi 



.J!!ito^: 



PglLnr 



Pot1" 



WordPerfect commands are easier in Windows, thanlfs to the interface. 



simply select a tool and drag a 
box, WordPerfect requires you to 
make at least two menu selec- 
tions. And when WordPerfect box- 
es contain text, the text isn't direct- 
ly editable. You have to double- 
click on the box, which takes you 
to a separate text editor, where 
you enter the text in a distinctly 
marginal WYSIWYG environment. 
This procedure is a serious draw- 
back for desktop publishers (al- 
though it's a vast improvement 
over the command structure of 
the DOS product). If frames are 



28 



COMPUTE JULY 1992 



of frustration with marginal and un- 
predictable performance. 

WordPerfect for Windows is 
best for users who will be sharing 
documents with WordPerfect for 
DOS or another platform. Under 
these circumstances, DOS 
WordPerfect users will be drawn 
to the Windows product and even- 
tually demand to have their own 
machines refurbished for Win- 
dows so they can use WordPer- 
fect for Windows, too. 

ROBERT BIXBY 

Circle Reader Service NLmber 307 



WORDSTAR FOR 
VlflNDOWS 

WordStar for Windows has the dis- 
tinction of being the only Win- 
dows word processor to offer you 
WordStar- and WordStar 2000- 
compatible keystrokes, and for 
that reason it will automatically at- 
tract the attention of longtime 
users of those DOS programs. The 
real strengths of this program, how- 
ever, are advanced text editing 
and desktop publishing. 

In part because it's a Windows 
product, WSWin handles text ed- 
iting with lots of flexibility and often 
with ease. I like being able to use 
the old WordStar-compatible key 
commands, andthe pull-down men- 
us are fine, but I really like press- 
ing a single button at the top of the 
screen to choose a paragraph 
style, font, point size, emphasis 
(bold, italic, underline, or double un- 
derline), or view mode. A press of 
a button also changes alignment, 
number of columns, spacing, and 
other features. There's even a Tool- 
box bar with buttons that allow you 
to create and insert graphics. As 
a touch-typist, I was pleasantly sur- 
prised to find how easily I could ma- 
nipulate text and use the buttons 
in this interface. 

The program's extensive array 
of text-editing features includes 
search and replace, spelling 
checks, a thesaurus, footnotes, 
endnotes, superscripts, sub- 
scripts, headers, footers, and con- 
tents- and index-generating capa- 
bilities—and the list goes on and 
on. (See the features grid for the 
full story.) Gone are the dot com- 
mands of earlier WordStar pack- 
ages, but with Windows, you 
won't really need them. 

According to WordStar, this is 
the only word processor with a the- 
saurus that provides synonyms, 
antonyms, near synonyms, near 
antonyms, and see-also referenc- 
es. In addition, the thesaurus 
gives you definitions so that you 
can choose the best word to con- 
vey your meaning. I found 18 



PC Productivity Manager 



Work at your peak potential! 
Break free of cumbersome MS-DOS 
restrictions and limitations! 

Single keypresses or mouse clicks do 
it all for you with COMPUTE'S super 
new PC Productivity Manager. 

Packed with 38 PC batch-file extensions 
and power utilities, this easy-to-use disk 
includes individual help menus for every 
program. You don't have to be a computer 
maven — just press F1 for Help anytime! 

The power utilittes alone are worth 
many times the cost of this disk, tmag- 
inel Programs to speed up your keyboard, 
edit disk files, edit and search memory, 
find a specific text string in disk files — plus 
memory-resident programs such as a pop- 
up calculator, a programmer's reference 
tool, an editable macro key program, and 
a graphic screen-capture utility, and more 
all included on this jam-packed disk. 

Our batch-file extensions add new com- 
mands to standard batch-file language. 
Now you can easily create menus, draw 
boxes, and write strings in your choice 
of colors anywhere on the screen — all 
with simple, easy-to-use commands. 
Then, add some zest to your batch files 
with a command that lets you play a se- 
ries of notes! 

Plus handy system tools let you delete 
an entire subdirectory with one command, 
find out if the system has enough memory 
for an application before it runs, cause the 
computer to remember the current direc- 
tory so that you can come back to it later, 
and much, much, more. 



.-^ 



QRtfERYOU 
/fSlANAGER TODl 




A 

-VI 

I 
I 

-I 
I 

V 'J 



Subtotal 
. Sales Ta;< (Residents of NC and NY please add appropriate 

sales tax for your area.Canadian orders, add 7% goods and 

services tax. ) 
. Shipping and Handling ($2.00 U.S. and Canada, $3.00 surface 

mail. $5.00 airmail per disk.) 
. Total Enclosed 



Ctieck or Money Order MasterCard _ VISA 

(MasterCard and Visa accepted on orders vwth subtotal over $20.) 




D YES! Please send me _ 5V4 inch disk(s) ($14.95 each) _ 3H inch disk(s) ($15.9S each) 



State/ 

Pravmce 

Send your order to COMPUTE'S PC Productmfy Manager. 
324 W. Wendover Are., Suite 200, Greensboro, NC 27408. 



TEST LAB 




definitions for the nondescript 
good, and for each definition, 
there's a list of synonyms — pretty 
impressive. This degree of help 
and control is available for a num- 
ber of features. 

The package comes with 
more than 20 paragraph styles, 
and each controls over 60 para- 
graph attributes. Need color in 
your documents? You can 
choose from 16.7 million colors 
for text, graphics, tables, bor- 
ders, and background. There's 
even widow and orphan control. 
To make life easier and show you 
the capabilities of the program, 
WordStar provides more than 45 
document templates — reports, 
memos, a newsletter, and more. 
I like being able to open a new 
file, designate a template, and re- 
place sample text and graphics 
with my own for a sharp, impres- 
sive document. 

Probably the biggest adjust- 
ment for you if you're a longtime 
WordStar user is working with 
frames in this frame-based pro- 
gram. Whether you're creating or 
importing text, graphics, or tables, 
you'll use these frames; and the 
controls you use will take some get- 
ting used to, especially if you're 
not accustomed to Windows. 

For getting a handle on using 
frames and other features, 1 
found the online tutorial indispen- 
sable; the four manuals that 
come with the program are well 

'SI 29 upgrade from WordStar or competi- 
tive product. 



WordStar for Windows 
IBM PC and compatibles (80286 or 
taster), 2MB RAM, Windows- 
compatible graphics, mouse— 495* 

WORDSTAR INTERNATIONAL 
201 Almoda del Prado 
NOvalO, CA 94949 
(800) 227-5B09 
(800) 426-8855, ext. 19 



done, too. If you stick with the tu- 
torial and practice using these 
frames, the payoff is a remarka- 
ble degree of control over the 
way your document looks. 

With WSWin, you also get 
Bitstream Facelift, which includes 
13 scalable typefaces, and Cor- 
rect Grammar, the company's 
grammar checker, which works 
with several Windows products. 

Need to import or reference 
spreadsheet data files? WSWin 
can do it. It can also import major 
graphics formats, including 
DRW, PLT, EPS, WMF MacPaint, 
TIF, PIX, PCX, and BMP. And 
WordStar offers you a long list of 
major word processors that you 
can import from or export to. 
What's more, in addition to its 
DDE linking capabilities with oth- 



er Windows applications, WSWin 
offers links to DOS applications. 

As powerful and attractive as 
WSWin is, there are some signifi- 
cant omissions you need to be 
aware of. For example, you can 
open only one document at a 
time, although it's possible to open 
two versions of the WordStar pro- 
gram. Also, WSWin doesn't offer 
macros, which keeps you from au- 
tomating certain procedures. Rnal- 
ly, I wasn't able to get a word 
count without running Correct 
Grammar. This isn't a tremendous 
inconvenience, but the word 
counts aren't as easy as they 
were in the DOS version. 

I found performance lacking 
on a 386SX/20 but just fine on a 
486SX/25. If you lack powerful 
hardware and especially if you 
need speed without a multitude 
of desktop publishing features, a 
great DOS word processor like 
WordStar 6.0 or 7.0 will probably 
better meet your needs. Howev- 
er, if you want WordStar com- 
mand-key compatibility and if the 
features and speed of WSWin 
meet your needs, it's a capable 
program you'll want to consider. 

MIKEHUDNALL 

Circle Reader Service Number 303 



w:,Mn.iiiii:niriwsD 



-ilvl*. 1-(^nil 1M*lh' 



Slvt a:ii-i,'i"-< Ij fen tpi' iiMII" "jl] jl io: [''"""1 |i| jTJ 'f BJtt'f-=-[ J^ 



rj'R'^i nxj '^'^[^f^ izm ESB awi^i »i 




n JT.i-i^i.-.i 



; k-:iT^rtii%t*:iMi 



HfVUtt j 



\1t> ..m11jiim.u 
>rMi,tV. t tlifoiata ■*i}9«0 






.Azlyj± 



] hLrtii : a^: 



30 



COMPUTE JULY 1992 



WSWin's thesaurus provides synonyms, antonyms, definitions, and more^ 



DELPi- Hie |1 per hour online solution! 

DELPHI'S 20/20 Advantage Plan sets the standard for online value: 
20 hours for only $20, for all the services you want! 




• Thousands of files to download. 

• Chat lines with hundreds of participants, 

• Worldwide e-mail. 

• Hobby and computer support groups. 

• Multi-player games. 

• Local access numbers 

in over 600 cities and towns. 



M Offen 5 hours for $5! 



Try DELPHI at $1 per hour. Join today and get 5 hours of evening and weekend 
access for only $5. If you're not satisfied, simply cancel your account before the 
end of the calendar month with no further obligation. Keep your account active 
and you'll automatically be enrolled in the 20/20 plan for the next month. 

1. Via modem, dial 1-800-365-4636. 

2. When connected, press RETURN once or twice. 

3. At Password, enter CP55 
Questions? Call 1-800-695-4005. 

Rates apply for evening and weekend access from within the mainland US. There is a one-time enrollment fee of $19 
when you join the 20/20 Advantage Plan. Further details are provided during the online registration. 




DELPHI is a service of 

General Videotex Corporation 

1030 Massachusetts Avenue 

Cambridge, MA 021 38-5302 

800-695-4005 • 617-491-3393 

circle RHKtw Servica Numbar 161 



TEST LAB 



Windows Word Processor Features 1 




Ami Pro 2.0 


Describe Word 
Processor 3.0 


Microsoft Word for 
Windows 2.0 


WordPerfect 5,1 

for Windows 


WordStar for 
Windows 


TEXT EDITING ^m^m. I 


Draft editor 


m 


3 


■ 


B 


a 


Search and replace 


Wildcards 


m 


■ 


■ 


n 


a 


Formats (tags) 


u 


a 


■ 


■ 


a 


Grammar checker 


a 


3 


■ 


a 


a 


Spellng dictionaries 


Legal dictionary 


a 


■ 

(option— S149.95) 


■ 
(option) 


3 


3 


Medical dictionary 


D 


a 
(option-S149,95> 


■ 
(option) 


3 


3 


Scientific dictionary 


D 


■ 
(option— S149.95) 


■ 
(option) 





3 


fesona! dictionary 


■ 


■ 


■ 


m 


m 


Foreign, language dictionary 


■ 
(option) 


■ 
(aption-S149.95) 


■ 
(option) 


m 

(option— $99,00, 

$149.00 for Hebrew 

and Arabic) 


m 

(option— S69.95 

each for French, 

German, Italian, 

Spanish, or 

Norwegian) 


Thesaurus 


Synonyms 


■ 


■ 


a 


B 


a 
(Eiso near 
synonyms) 


Antonyms 


a 


m 


■ 
(and related words) 


■ 


B 

(also near 
antonyms) 


Definitions 




■ 


■ 


3 


a 


Indexing 




■ 


■ 


B 


a 


Contents generator 




■ 


■ 


B 


a 


Footnotes 




□ 


B 


■ 


a 


Endnotes 




□ 


■ 


B 


a 


Headers 




■ 


■ 


B 


a 


Footers 




■ 


■ 


B 


a 


Word counts 




a 


> 


■ 


■ 

(through Correct 

Grammar) 


Maximum number of documents open 
at one time 


9 


iimited by memory 


9 


9 


1 


Editable macros 


■ 

(ships With 68 

macros) 


■ 


■ 


B 


a 


Number of undo levels 


4 


unlimited 


1 


1 (3 undeletes) 


1 


Accelerator keys 


■ 


■ 


■ 


B 


a 

(for WSWin, 

WordStar, and 

WordStar 2000 


Widow and orphan control 


■ 


■ 


■ 


B 




Aulohyphenation 


■ 


■ 


■ 


B 




Autopagination 


■ 


■ 


■ 


B 




Auto save 


■ 


3 


B 


B 




Nonprinting annotations 


■ 


3 


B 


B 




Number of colors 


t6 miiiion 


16 


16 


256 


16.7 million 


Number of paragraph styles supplied 


48 {Style sheets) 


50 


4 (more through the 
templates) 





24 



32 COt^PUTE JULY 1992 





Ami Pn> 2.0 


DeScHbe Word 
Processor 3.0 


Microsoft Word for 
Windows 2.0 


WbrdPerfecl 5.1 
for Windows 


WordStar lor 
Windows 


DESKTOP PUBLISHING 


Magnification range 


10%^00% 


10%-500% 


25%-200% 


58%^C0% 


25%-200% 


Maximum number of columns 


8 


20 


32 


as many as lit on a 
page 


4 


Rulers 




■ 


■ 


■ 


a 


Choice of units 
of measurement 
(pis., in., picas, cm.) 




■ 


■ 


■ 


a 


Number of built-in templates 


48 


50 


18 





50 


Drawing tools 




■ 


■ 


□ 


a 


Graptiic editing 




■ 


■ 


a 
(size and color) 


a 


Scaling 




■ 


■ 


■ 


a 


Cropping 




■ 


■ 


• 


a 


Number of clip art images 


100+ 


6 (extra disk wtien 
you register) 


48 


36 


77 


TABLES 1 


Automatic text wrap in cells 


■ 


■ 


■ 


■ 


a 


Equation editor 


■ 


3 


■ 


■ 


D 


Column matti 


■ 


3 


■ 


■ 
(only in tables) 


a 


Fixed Of variable column widtfis 


variable 


variable 


variable 


variable 


variable 


Table line styles 


■ 


■ 


m 


■ 


a 


TYPOGRAPHY 


Tracking 


■ 


• 


m 


■ 


a 


Leading 


■ 


■ 


m 


■ 


a 


Kerning 


■ 

(PostScript printers 

only) 


■ 


m 


■ 


a 


Point size range 


1-999 


any (ATM or 
PostScript) 


1-127 


.OOOOI-larges! size 

paper can 

accommodate 


1-792 


Degree of increments (tiow small) 


1 point 


VioQ point 


1 point 


Vrai point 


Vio point 


COMNECTIVITY 


DDE linking 


■ 


■ 


■ 


a 


■ 


OLE 


■ 


1 


■ 


3 


3 


Links to DOS app files 


3 


■ 


■ 


3 


a 


Netwofk support 


m 


■ 


■ 


a 


a 


Number of word processor types 
supported 


33 


59 


20 


13 (not counting 
version numbers) 


73 


IFARNINfiTnOlS V^'■ ' " 


Online tutorial 


D 

(manual-based 
tutorial) 




(manual-based 

tutorial and disk 

examples) 


a 


O 




Online fielp 


■ 


■ 


■ 


a 


a 


Duration of customer support 


unlimited 


90 days 


unlimited 


unlimited 


life of product 


BBS support 


3 


a 


■ 


a 


3 


fttx support 


m 


□ 


O 


■ 


a 


Special help 


CompuServe 


n 


CompuServe 


CompuServe. 

GEnie, America 

Online 


CompuServe 


B —yes —no 













JULY 1992 COMPUTE 33 



NEWS & NOTES 



Jill Champion 



Wedding Planner 

takes the 

stress out of getting 

married— or 

at least same of it 



Get Me fo the Church on Time 

No one can guarantee a 
marriage will last, but a new 
software product from Ninga 
Software will at least make 
sure the wedding ceremony 
is a dream instead of a night- 
mare. Ninga is a young com- 
pany determined to fill a 
niche in the home-software 
market with Wedding Planner, 
a complete guide to orches- 
trating a wedding. 

Designed for IBM PCs and 
compatibles, Wedding Plan- 
ner helps prospective brides 
and grooms completely organ- 
ize all those time-consuming 




but necessary wedding de- 
tails in a concise, alphabeti- 
cal format that's simple to ac- 
cess. Perhaps the biggest ad- 
vantage of using the program 
is that it handles all list keep- 
ing by tracking invitations, 
RSVPs, gifts, and thank-you 
notes. You can view up-to-the- 
minute information in each of 
15 different reports that will 
tell you, for instance, which 
RSVPs you're still waiting for. 
Daily calendar prompts 
serve as reminders for an as- 
sortment of things, such as 
when to order the bride's 
gown and when to book a re- 
ception hall. A budget feature 
allows you fo keep a running 
total of all wedding expendi- 
tures. Tips on everything 
from buying an engagement 
ring to ordering a wedding 



cake are included in the Gen- 
eral Wedding Information fea- 
ture, You can even print out 
address labels for your invita- 
tions and thank-you notes. 

Suggested retail price for 
Wedding Planner is $49.95. 
For further information, con- 
tact Ninga Software, 736 8th 
Avenue SW, Suite 330, Cal- 
gary, Alberta, Canada T2P 
1H4; (800)265-5555. 

Schemers Unite 

Don't let the name fool you. 
The SCHEMER'S Guide, pub- 
lished by Schemers of Fort 
Lauderdale, Florida, isn't a 
handbook for conspiracy; it's 
a guide to what some astute 
educators hope will be the fu- 
ture programming language 
of choice. Scheme is a stream- 
lined programming language, 
derived from the artificial-intel- 
ligence language LISP, which 
places concept above syntax — 
unlike BASIC and Pascal. 

The president of Schem- 
ers, Terry Kaufman, says the 
way computer science is intro- 
duced to students in school 
these days could jeopardize 
the country's future as a com- 
petitor in the technology mar- 
ketplace. "Colleges are al- 
ready noticing a drop in the 
number of students choosing 
to major in computer sci- 
ence," Kaufman says. 

After spending ten years 
working for IBM, Kaufman 
thinks businesses, too, 
should be concerned about 
the quality of computer-sci- 
ence knowledge new employ- 
ees — especially recent col- 
lege graduates — bring to their 
jobs. Scheme, he says, is 
such a simple language to 
learn (it encompasses object- 
oriented programming and 
techniques), yet it's very pow- 
erful, and it helps you learn oth- 
er languages more easily To 
find out more, contact Schem- 
ers, 4250 Gait Ocean Mile, 
Suite 7U, Fort Lauderdale, Flor- 
ida 33308; (305) 776-7376. 



Life Can Be Easier 

A new development from Mi- 
crosystems Software should 
help some of the 43 million dis- 
abled Americans who are ei- 
ther currently working or look- 
ing for a job. ADAPTA-LAN, a 
set of local-area-network pro- 
grams designed for physical- 
ly challenged users, is in- 
stalled on a network of IBM' 
PCs or compatibles, provid- 
ing employees with screen 
magnification; word predic- 
tion; and access to the PC by 
way of external switches, vis- 
ual beeps, and more. ADAP- 
TA-LAN's nine software pack- 
ages include MAGic and MAG- 
ic Deluxe screen-magnifica- 
tion software for DOS and Win- 
dows; HandiKEY and Handi- 
CODE for PC access without 
a keyboard: HandiSHIFT and 
HandiWORD for those with lim- 
ited keyboarding ability; Han- 
diCHAT for nonspeaking per- 
sons; HandiPHONE tele- 
phone and modem access 
for people with physical limita- 
tions; and SeeBEEP a visual 
indicator of a PC audio beep 
for the hearing-impaired. 

The package retails for 
$2,995 per server with an un- 
limited number of users. For 
more information, contact Mi- 
crosystems Software, 600 
Worcester Road, Framing- 
ham, Massachusetts 01701- 
5342; (508) 879-9000. 

Super Floppy 

Maxell says its new Super RD 
(Reliable and Durable) SVa- 
inch floppy disk, the MF2-HD, 
is for "less accommodating" 
environments — as in ul- 
tradusty offices and different 
floppy drives, One of Maxell's 
improvements over other disk 
brands is its patented, airtight 
Dual Interlocking Flex-Shutter, 
which provides "a virtually 
contamination-free internal flop- 
py disk environment," The 
shutter fits more tightly 
against the disk casing than 
other shutters do, helping to 



34 



COMPUTE JULY 1992 



.■«■ .. • 



MllffiNNIUM POTS O^'HE \5^DRLD 





Build power sources In supl'ly 
and expand )iiiir cities. 




Slinky for natural resources ami 
seismic stiibility. 



DisrRmtiTED nv 



Circle Reader Service Number 124 






.■^.: [■- 



w 



liiiilil ntilimry buses for uffeiisire 
and (lefeitsit^ aclion. 



^.r' 



Ptanlfnrvsls ami !hiri.-i,;i:tls lo 
counter world jMdhtliffu, 



A distant world - a new civilisation. You control the delicate 
balance of the natural world. Confront the many challenges 
of a true world leader - your actions can save the world from 
global warming and city pollution... your forces can destroy 
the enemy trying to blast your cities or poison your planet. 
The world is in your hands ■■ take control! 



Published by 




MILLENNIUM 



To order Visit your local retaUer or call (800) 245-4525 anytime. 
Available for IBM and compaliWes and Amiga for S49.95. 



Check for pHlltition. COJ and 




NEWS & NOTES 



store floppies in 

Slidex disk-storage unit 

witliDUI worrying 

about stray static or 

magnettsfn. 



keep out all kinds of dust and 
microscopic particles that 
could contaminate thie inside 
magnetic surface. 

Botfi the shutter and cas- 
ing are made of new materi- 
als developed by Maxell. Ac- 
cording to Maxell's tests, no 
visible wear occurs even after 
more than 10.000 shutter open- 
ings and closings. The highly 
flexible cartridge casing lets it 
adapt to changes such as the 
level of pressure applied by 
different disk drives. As a re- 
sult, the magnetic head 
achieves optimal contact with 
the magnetic disk at all 
times, and that maximizes the 
reading and writing accuracy 
of the disk drive. 

fvlaxell has set the suggest- 
ed retail prices at $35.70 for a 
package of ten unformatted 
disks and $38.60 for a pack- 
age of ten formatted disks. 

A Better Mousetrap 

The ideal mouse might not be 
a mouse at all, according to In- 
terlink Electronics, nnaker of a 
mouse replacement for those 
who find conventional mice 
and trackballs cumbersome. 
Interlink has adapted its 
Force Sensing Resistors 
(FSRs) to allow you to use a 
key. button, or joystick as a 
full two-button mouse with fin- 
gertip control. The device is 




integrated into your keyboard 
rather than attached as a pe- 
ripheral. Toggling a key, but- 
ton, or joystick lets you con- 
trol the direction and speed 
of the cursor. 

Interlink's alternatives in- 
clude a Dedicated Pointer Lo- 
cation, which is like having a 
two-button mouse integrated 
into your laptop case or key- 
board and with which you 
can perform point-and-click 
operations with one hand; a 
Joystick Pointer, which is a 
hinged, collapsible stick the 
size of a keyboard key that's 
integrated into the keyboard: 
and the Key Mouse (devel- 
oped in conjunction with Key 
Tronic), which is a key-cap 
pointer that uses FSRs 
placed under a key cap. 

Integration into existing key- 
board designs is simple and in- 
expensive through a fully de- 
bugged, single-chip interface 
that supports RS-232C serial 
ports, the IBM PS/2 mouse 
port, and standard bus 
mouse interfaces. Designed 
to operate with both DOS and 
Windows mouse drivers, the 
devices require no software 
modification to the host com- 
puter. For more information, 
contact Interlink Electronics, 
1110 Mark Avenue, Carpin- 
teria, California 93013-2918; 
(805) 684-2100. 

Slidex Disk-Storage System 

Now there's hope that sci- 
ence will cure disk-zap in our 
lifetimes. The Slidex FD-3000 
is a patented filing system for 
3y2-inch floppies that protects 
disks from static and magnet- 
ism while allowing you to file 
and retrieve them easily. 

Disks are "snapped" onto 
rigid plastic pages that can 
be stored as hanging files, in 
three-ring binders, or as 
stand-alone books holding up 
to 24 disks per book. A thick, 
stainless-steel plate inside the 
front and back covers pro- 
vides magnetic protection. 



To find out where to buy 
Slidex disk-storage units, con- 
tact TRIWEF (Slidex distribu- 
tor), 200 Valley Road, Suite 
204. Mount Arlington, New Jer- 
sey 07856; (201)770-2800. 

Roll-Your-Own Manuals 

Any company, large or small, 
stands to benefit from having 
a policy handbook that an- 
swers questions most often 
asked by employees — informa- 
tion on salary reviews, compa- 
ny holidays, benefits, leaves 
of absence, and other critical 
policies. Lack of such policies 
can affect employee morale 
and even result in legal prob- 
lems down the road. Prepar- 
ing an employee manual can 
give employers the impetus to 
form policies when they 
haven't previously done so. 

Employee ManualMaker 
has been edited and re- 
viewed by a variety of indus- 
try specialists. It includes 
more than 125 policies and 
30 benefits, which are organ- 
ized, defined, and written for 
review and customization. 

A special primer section in- 
cludes advice on the best 
ways to find and hire employ- 
ees, an employee application 
with a special preemployment 
release to help gain informa- 
tion from previous employers, 
and much more. Employee 
ManualMaker retails for $130. 
For more information, contact 
JIAN Tools tor Sales, 127 Sec- 
ond Street, Los Altos, Califor- 
nia 94022; (800) 346-5426. 



Companies with items of inter- 
est suitable for "News & 
Notes" sliould send informa- 
tion along with a color slide or 
color transparency to News & 
Notes, Attn: Jill Champion, 
COMPUTE. 324 West Wen- 
dover Avenue. Suite 200. 
Greensboro, North Carolina 
27408- Although space is lim- 
ited, all items will be consid- 
ered for publication. 3 



36 COMPUTE JULY 1992 




A. HartlBall lit talies a lull cut st major league realism. A power line-up thai includes printable stats, standings and 
box scores; the aDillty to import data trom HardBall IC Earl Weaver It" M Tony LaRussa"; plus aTeam S Player EtJItor 
that allows you to alter everything from team logos to a player's ability. 





A HarHBalt miaaOsott wilti aigitizeH players 
and 256 color VGA graphics. Nobody beats this 
double play combo. Visuals as eye opening as a line 
drive up the middle. Animation as smooth as a 

Golii Glove shortstop. From fresh mowed grass 
to ivy covered walls, details that capture 

The Show. 




HardBallltl tests each hitter's power witti eigM 
real ballparks. Famous fields from both major 
leagues. Your catcher may have just enough pop 
to put it out of Chicago's "friendly confines;' but 
can he go deep in Toronto? 



AHardBalllllliastlie 
best play-by-play man in tlie business. Network 
broadcast great Al Michaels joins the HardBall 
///Team up in the booth, viith a digitized 
description of all the action. 



A. HamBalllll tlirusts you into ttie heat o! a pennant 
race. It's a 162 game, major league season -complete with 
road trips and an all-star game. Compllegood numbers 
along the way and maybe you'll make the roster. 

Tire only computer game willi Hall olFame credentials. You don't 

outsell every baseball title in history by standing pat in the 

off-season. New HardBall III redefines computer baseball once 

more with real play-by-play announcing; unprecedented graphics, 

realism and playabillty; plus more of the authentic baseball 

nuances tliat serious fans want in a simulation. More runs. 

More hits. No errors. 

To order, visit your lavorite software retailer or call 

1-8BB-245-7744. 




The best in entertainment software." 



Piay-Sy-0i5y5nnc>uirkC)r\6 requires 2MB3f RAM, Actual gari^sCTeensfram IBM PC VGA verstofi of tht gamete Ga 

tfafJflfnaA 0* Elecfcrpnk: Arti Taiy LaRussa is a trademai1( of Straa^ 

Clrde B*»6w Sefvic* Number 232 jULY 1992 COMPUTE 37 



FEEDBACK 



Padding the phone 

bill, freeing up directory 

space, coping witli 

EMS, waiting for Itie 

globe to settle, 

packing your system, 

and providing 

for modem errors 



Obscene Phone Charges 

please make your readers 
aware that the FCC is quietly 
working on a resolution that us- 
ers of modems should pay ex- 
tra charges for use of the pub- 
lic telephone network. Com- 
puServe, Tymnet, and Telenet 
would also be charged as 
much as $6.00 per hour per 
user for use of the public tel- 
ephone network. The money 
is to offset funds lost due to de- 
regulation. 

If you own a computer or 
plan to purchase one. telecom- 
munications is probably a big 
part of your computing life. 
Charges like this will either 
kill or severely cripple the com- 
mercial online services. Write 
to the following people to let 
them know you're opposed to 
this surcharge. 

Chairman of the FCC 
1919 MSt. NW 
Washington, DC 20549 

Chairman, Senate Communica- 
tions Subcommittee 
SH-227 Hart Building 
Washington, DC 20510 

Chairman, House Telecommu- 
nications Subcommittee 
B-331 Rayburn Building 
Washington, DC 20515 

Remember that modem us- 
ers already pay fees for use 
of the public telephone lines — 
their phone bills. 

ANTHONY J. HONER 
DENT, MN 

Thanks for letting our readers 
know about this action. The 
chairman of the House Tele- 
communications Subcommit- 
tee, Edward Markey, is al- 
ready opposed to the sur- 
charge. You might have more 
effect sending your letters to 
the ranking minority member 
of the subcommittee, Mat- 
thew Rinaldo (Room 2469, 
Rayburn Building. Washing- 
ton, DC 20515). Since this is 



an issue that seems to come 
up again and again, and 
since this is an election year, 
perhaps it would be a good 
idea to find out how the con- 
gressional candidates in your 
area stand on this surcharge 
and vote accordingly. 

Space Cadet 

When my son was using his 
Joe Montana Football game, 
he named one of his leagues 
DREAM TEAM. This created 
the directory DREAM iE. The 
program seems to use it OK 
and saves game files there, 
but I want to get into it to 
erase some of the old files 
that are taking up room on 
my hard disk. The DOS com- 
mand to change directory 
won't recognize DREAM TE be- 
cause of the space. What can 
I do? 

CLARK HARPER 
WINSTON-SALEM, NC 

Although you could not cre- 
ate or access a file or directo- 
ry with that name using the nor- 
mal DOS commands, a pro- 
gram that bypasses the com- 
mand interpreter would have 
no trouble creating such a 
directory. The solution is there- 
fore fairly simple. Just get 
hold of PC Tools and use the 
PCSHELL program. It pro- 
vides a desktop from which 
you can create, rename, ac- 
cess, and delete subdirecto- 
ries with spaces in their 
names. 

It's My Parity 

I have a problem with my 286 
clone. Soon after upgrading 
from a CGA to a VGA system, 
I started getting memory pari- 
ty interrupt errors. I get these 
when using the DOS BACK- 
UP program and when trying 
to install programs to my 
hard disk. I replaced the 
board and monitor with the 
old CGA versions, and the er- 
rors stopped. 
I called Orchid, the maker 



of the VGA card, and was 
told that there was a conflict 
with the video memory at loca- 
tion AOOOH to C7FFH be- 
cause another program was 
trying to use that memory. I 
was encouraged to buy a 
memory-manager program, 
such as ORAM by Quarter- 
deck. I purchased ORAM, 
then found out that I need ei- 
ther EMS, EEMS, or Chips 
and Technologies' shadow 
RAM. I don't know what these 
are or where to get them. 

At this time I have a 286 
with 1 MB of RAM, Phoenix BI- 
OS version 3.1, and DOS 5.0. 
I use ProDesigner II. Can you 
tell me what I can do to keep 
this system and not spend a 
lot more money to solve this 
problem? 

DAVID J GRAVERT 
DAVENPORT lA 

In short. Orchid is right — 
you're a victim of progress, 
and you'll need to shell out 
even more money to make 
this work. 

EMS. or Expanded Memo- 
ry Specification, is a standard 
for extra memory on PCs that 
allows PCs to use more than 
640K, allowing you to add up 
to 16MB of memory for data 
storage. It's a hardware/soft- 
ware combination that both 
memory manufacturers and 
software developers have 
agreed upon. The 286 and 
higher-numbered chips allow 
use of much more than 640K, 
but only by running the chip 
in a different mode, called pro- 
tected mode, that's nominally 
Incompatible with DOS. 
That's why OS/2 and the up- 
coming 32-bit Windows can 
address huge amounts of 
memory, but only by running 
in protected mode and forc- 
ing you to run DOS programs 
in a separate compatibility 
box mode. This memory con- 
fusingly, is called extended 
memory and is not compati- 
ble with EMS. EEMS is a revi- 



38 COMPUTE JULY 1992 



'"'• '*^lli"'^V?T^ *•'■ "''TtlS/^'l 



ma 



ourfli 




Now Falcon 3.0"takes you places youVe never floiTO before. 



operation: Fighting Tiger'takes you on action-packed 
missions in ttiree new Asian campaigns. Fly your F-16 
to Korea, to ttie Pakistan/India border, to Japan and 
the disputed Kurile Islands, where you can also fly 



FALCCJsf 



fiptftmrn ^liIlJU^v 




Operation: Fighting Tiger requires Falcon 3.0 

For Visa/MistBfCard orders call 24 hours a day. 7()ayss weak: 1-B00-595-GAME (Orders Only)- 

For lechn leal queslions and availability call: 1-51 0-B22-11 64 (M-F: 9am-5pm PST) 
Opandon: ngMng tigv and Filcon U n nlwiKti III) ScMrum HetoByli l> (rigWiiM irtdvnark ol Splw^^ 

Circle Reader Service Number 108 



the advanced FSX. The incredible scope of Falcon 30 
delivers everything from Instant Action arcade excite- 
ment to plotting your own Red Flag training missions 
to engaging in a dramatically different campaign 
every time you play. The flight models and terrain are 
real. The radar and weapons are real. The enemies, 
missions and campaigns nothing less than spine- 
tingUng. Joining forces with the most sophisticated 
flight simulation of all time. Operation: Fighting Tiger 
broadens your horizons as never before. And makes 
the wild blue yonder a whole lot wilder. 

Spectrum HohByteT 

A Division of Sphere. Inc. 2061 Challenger Drive, Alameda, CA 94501 



JULY 1992 COMPUTE 39 




FEEDBACK 



UVEI Specializing in 
questions of love 

1-900 



$5 first min./S3 ea. addl. min. 



Use the wisdom of 

psycliic forces to 

guide you in money, 

career and happiness 

1-900 

773-OMEN 

1 -900-773-6636 

S5 first min./S3 ea. add!, min. 

TALK TO A UVE PSYCHIC! 



For entertain merit purposes 

only. If you are under 18 years 

of age, please gel parental 

permission. Live psychics are 

available 24 hours a day. 

Sponsored by Pet Inc., P.O. Box 

166, Hollywood, CA 90078. 



sion of EMS that allows programs to 
run In expanded memory. Just to 
make things even tougher to under- 
stand, some software — ORAM Includ- 
ed — converts extended memory 
(wtiich the 286 understands natively) to 
expanded memory. This Is probably 
the best choice for you, since it gives 
you both options on your 286. So we 
suggest you go the extended memory 
route. This will cost you, at mail-order 
prices, about $50-$100 for an empty ex- 
tended memory board and about $60 
per megabyte of memory. One meg is 
enough, but I suggest two or three — 
or as much as you can afford. The 
price for EMS boards is similar 

Some things to remember if you pur- 
chase EMS: 

1. Make sure the chips are fast 
enough to run on your computer (for ex- 
ample, buy 80-ns chips if those are 
what your machine is equipped with). . 

2. Note that to work its magic, an 
EMS board or emulator snatches 64K 
from your precious 640K. So if you 
have 580K free before the EMS is in- 
stalled, you 'II end up with only 5 16K af- 
ter—but you'll have access to all the ex- 
tra memory you can afford. 

3. Make sure the software you use — 
ProDesigner, in this case — knows how 
to use EMS. Many programs don't 

Golden Globe 

PC Globe sounds really good, but 
what about the way the Soviet Union is 
changing? Should I wait until that situa- 
tion is resolved before buying it? 

NAOMI R, SMITH 
PEKIN. IL 

If you wait for the world to settle down 
and borders to remain firm, you'll have 
a long wait Companies that manufac- 
ture products on changing situations of- 
fer regular upgrades. PC Globe is up- 
dated every 12-18 months. The most 
recent update was in April 1992. The 
charge to receive these updates is $35 
per year 

Stranger in a Stronge Land 

1 work for the U.S. Foreign Service and 
have to ship my belongings, including 
my computer and peripherals, on a fair- 
ly regular basis. I already know about 
packing my hard drive, but I was hop- 
ing you could give me some addition- 
al pointers on how to secure delicate 
PC equipment for international trans- 
port. 

THOMAS C. PROCTOR 
JAKARTA. INDONESIA 

The best advice is to keep the ship- 
ping containers your components 



COMPUTE SEARCHSTAKES! 

No purchase or phone call required. For automatic 
enliy, call 1 ■900-454-8681 Ofi a touch-tone phone. The 
cost for the call is S1.50 for the first minute and SI .00 
per minute thereafter average call is estimated to be 2- 
3 minutes. Charges tor alls to (he atove number iwS 
appear on your phone bill. Callers must be 18 or older. 
To enter monthly SeanchStakes drawings, call from 9 
A.M. EDT on 4f2S/92 through midnight EST 12/31/92 
to give your name, address, telephone njmtrer, the 
Compute issue date (month), and the solution for ttie 
month you selecl. To enter the Grand Prize drawina 
call from 9;00 A.M. EST 1 1/1/92 through mUnighl EST 
1/31 /93 to give your name, address, telephone numljer, 
the solution to the Grand Priie SearchStakes plus the 
solution to any two of the previous monthly 
SearchStakes. All call-In entrants vwll recewe a S5.00 
savings coupon toward caller's choice of: (1) Kathy 
Keelon's newest book, Longevity, or (2) a two-year 
sutKcripSon to Compute. Multiple coupons may not be 
oomtiined on a singte Ixx* or subscription purctiase. 
Call as often as yoo wish; each call is a separate entry. 
Call-in entry option is void in GA. LA. IvIN, OR. HI and 
where prohibited. 

Alternate Entry Method: Print your name, address, 
and phone number on a 3' x 5" piece of paper. (1) To 
enter the monthly drawings, print the Ccmpute issue 
dale (month) and solutron for that month on your entry 
and address your envelope to include the issue date 
(month), for example; "June Compute SearchStakes." 
(2) To enler the Grand Prize drawing, print the words 
"Grand Prize," the Grand Prize solution, plus the 
solution to any two previous monthly SearchStakes 
on your entry. Address your envelope; "Compute 
SearchStakes Grand Prize." Mail all entries, 
addressed as directed atiove, to: 324 West Wendover 
Avenue, Suite 200, Greensboro, N.C. 27403. Enter 
as often as you wish; each entry must be mailed 
separately. All wrile-in enlnes must be postmarked by 
1/31/93 and received by 2/15/93. 
For the 3olution(s), complete rules, and detailed 
description of prizes including prize values, send a 
selt-addressed stamped envelope to Compute 
SearchStakes Solutions, Dept RRS.1965 Broadway, 
NY, N.Y. 10023-5965 by 12/31/92; no return postage 
required (or residents a) VT and WA. Solutions and 
prize Infomiation will be provided through the issue 
date in vfhich ttie request is received. 
Odds determined 6y r)umber ot enff/es received. 
Prizes/Values; Grand Prize (1), minimum value 
SIS.OOO-maximum value $40,000. (vlonthly prizes 
(6). one for each of the following Compute 1992 
issue dates: June, July. August. September, 
October, and November, minimum value SI ,500- 
maximum value S7,SO0. Maximum total prize 
value; S85,000. A description of each prize, 
including its approximate value, will appear in 
Compute prior to the first entry date for that prize. 
Prizes are not transferable or redeemable for cash. 
No substitution of prizes except as necessary, due 
to availability. Licensing, transportation, 
registration, and dealer charges, if applicable, are 
winner's responsibility. Winners may be required 
to pick up some prizes from the nearest dealership. 
Travel prizes must t>e from a major airport nearest 
winner's home and must be used within 12 months 
of award date. Additional restrictions may apply. 
Taxes are the winner's responsibility. 
Open only to U.S. residents 16 and older, except 
employees and their families of Compute Int'l Ltd., 
POWER GROUP, INC., their respective subsidiaries, 
affiliates, and advertising agencies. All federal, state, 
kxal laws and regulations apply. Void where prohibited. 
This program is sponsored by Compute Intemational 
Ltd.. 1965 Broadway. NY. N.Y. 10023. (212) 496- 
6100. Monthly winners v;ill be selected at random 
from among all eligible entries received by the judges 
by the following drawing dates: June issue-7/31/92, 
July issue-8/31/92, August issue-9/30/92, Seplember 
issue- 10/30/92, Oclober issue-1 1/30/92. November 
issue-12/31/92. Grand Prize winner will be selected at 
random from among all eligible entries received by 
2/15/93. Winners will be selected by POWER 
GROUP, INC., an independent judging organization 
whose decisions are linal. Winners wil be notified by 
trail and required to execute and retum an affidavit of 
eligibility and release v#ilhin 21 days of date on 
notilication letter or alternates will be selected a! 
random. Limit one winner per household 
This sweepstakes is subject lo the Official Rules 
and Regulations. For a list of winners, send a salf- 
addressed stamped envelope lo: Compute 
SearchSt^es Winners, Dept RRW. 1965 Broadv/ay, 
NY, N.Y. 10023-5965 by 3/31/93. Requests will be 
fulfilled after the sweepstakes ends. 



Editor 

Arl Director 

Managing Editor 

Features Editor 

Reviews Editor 

Editor, Gazette 

Editor, Amiga Resource 

Copy Editors 

Editoriai Assistant 
Contributing Editors 



CJifton i<ames 

Robin C Case 

David Engiisfi 

Ftoben Bixby 

Mike h^udnall 

Tom Netsei 

Denny Aikin 

Karen Huiiman 

Margaret Ramsey 

Polly Cillpam 

Syh/ia Grafiarrk. Eddie Huffman. 

Gregf} i<eizer, Tony Roberts. 

Karen Siepalt 

AutLimn Miller 



ART 
Assistant Art Director Kenneth A Hardy 
Designer Jo Boyhin 
Copy Production Manager Terry Casti 

PRODUCTION 
Production Manager De Potter 

Traffic Manager Barbara A. Williams 

PROGRAMMING 

Manager, Programming Troy Tucifer 
& Ortline Services 

Programmers Bruce M Bowden 
Steve Draper 
Bradley M Small 

ADMIKISTRATIOM 



President. COO 

Executive Vice President, 

Operations 

Editorial Director 

Operations Manager 

Oirice Manager 

Sr. Attmintstrative Assistant 

Arfminlslrative Assistant 

Receptionist 



Kalhy Keeton 
William Tynan 

ifeilh F«rrell 
David Hensiey Jr. 
Sybil Agee 
Julia Fleming 
Lisa Witliams 
LeVVanda Fox 



ADVERTISING 
Vice President, Peter T. Johnsmeyer 
Associate Publisher (2t2) /.ge-eiM 

Vice President, James B. Marlise 
Sales Development 

ADVEflTlSING SALES OFFICES 

East IDoast: Full-Pago and Standard Disi:lay Ads- Peter T Jotms- 
meyer. Ctlris CoelhO, COMPUTE Publications International Ltd.. 
1965 Broadiray, New York. NY 10023: (212) 496-6100. South- 
east—Harriet Rogers, S03 A St.. SE, Wasnington. D.C. 20003; 
(202) 546-5926. Florida— J. M. Flemer Associates, 3300 NE 
192nd St., Suite 192, Avenlura. FL 33180; (30B) 933-1467, (306) 
933-8303 (FAX) Midwest— Full-Page and Standard Display 
Ads— Starr Lane. Malional Accounts Manager, 1 1 1 East WacK- 
er Dr, Suite 50a. Chicago, IL 60601 , (312) 819-0900 (312) 619- 
0813 (FAX), Norltwesl^erry Thompson, Jules E Thompson 
Co . 1290 Howard Ave . Suite 303. Burtingame. CA 94010. (415) 
348-B222. Lucille Dennis, (?07) 45 1 -3209 Southwest— Ian Ling- 
wood. 6723 Eton Ave . Canoga Park. CA 91303. (813) 992- 
4777. Product Mart Ads — Luctl3e Dennts, Jules E Thompson 
Co.. 1290 Howard Ave., Suite 303. Burtingame, CA 94010: (707) 
451-8209. U K & Europe-Beverly Wardale, 14UsgarTerr. Lon- 
don W14, England, 011-441-602-3298. Japan— Inlergroup Ccm- 
municaiions. Ltd,. JiroSemlja, President 3F Tiger BIdg 5-22 Shi- 
ba-koen, 3-Chorne, Minato ku, Tokyo 105. Japan, 03-434- 
2607 Classified Ads— Mara Manascn, i Wtods Ct.. Huntmgton. 

Ny 11743; (TEL/FAX) (5161 757-9562 

THE CORPORATION 

Bob Guccione (chairman and CEO) 

t^thy l^elon (vice-chairman) 

David J Myerson (president and CEO) 

William R Marlieb (president, marketing, sales and circulation) 

Patrick J- Gavin (senior vice president and CFO) 

Anihony J. Guccione (secretary and iieasuier) 

John Evans (president, loretgn editions and manutacturtng) 

Jefi Winston (senior vice president, adminislralive services) 

ADVERTISING AND MARKETING 

Sr. VP/Corp. Dir.. New Business 3evelopmenl; Beveiiy 
Wardale. VP/Dir . Group Advertising Sa es t-^ancy Kestenbaum; 
Sr VP/Sautnern and Midwest Advertising Dtr: Peter Goldsmith. 
Ollices New York 1965 Broadway, New York, NY 10023-5965. 
Tel (212) 496-6100, Telex 237128, Midwest 111 East Wacker 
Dr . Suite 508. Chicago. IL 60601; (312) 819-0900 (312) ai9- 
0B13 (FAX). South: 1726 K SI. NW, Suite 303. Washinglon. DC 
20006, Tel (202) ?2S-0320. West Coast: 572S Eton Ave . Can- 
oga Park, CA 91303, Tel (SIB) 992^777 UK and Europe: 14 
Lisgar Terrace. London W14 . England. Tel 1 -828-3336 Japan 
Intergroup Jiro Semba. Telex J25469IG JYO, Fax 434-5970. Ko- 
rea: Kaya Advtsng.. Inc.. Rm 402 Kunshin Annex B/0 251-1. 
Dohwa Dong, Mano-Ku, Seoul, Korea 1121), Tel. 719^906, Tel- 
ex K32144KayaBd. 

ADMINISTRATION 

Sr VP. CFO: Patrick J. Gavin: Sr. \/P/Admini5lralive Services; 
Jeri Winston: Sr. VP/Arl S, Graphics Frank Oevino: VP/ 
Circulation: Marcia Orovitz. VP Director Sales Promotions: Bev- 
erly Greiper; VP Productiorr: Hal Haipnei, Dir Newsstand Cir- 
culation Paul Rolnick. Dir,. Newsstand Operations Joe Galb; 
Dir Subscription Circulation; Marcia Schull,?, Director ol Re- 
searcti Robert Rattner. Advenismg Production Director Ctiar- 
lene Smith, Advertising Production Traffic Mgr.: Mark Williarns; 
Tralfic Dir William Harbutl. Production Mgr Tom Stinson; 
Asst Production Mgr.: f^ancy Rice; Foreign Editions Mgr,; Mi- 
chael Stevens. E>;ac Asst. to Bob Guccione; Diane O'Conneli; 
Exec. Ass! to David J. Myerson Teri Pisani; Special Assi. to Bob 
Guccione: Jane Homlish 



came in. including tlie styroform 
blocks that held your computer in 
place, but we assume that it's too late 
for thai. 

If you threw away your original pack- 
ing materials, you need plastic bags, 
and lots of 'em. It you receive bags 
from the federal government, the heavy 
garbage bags will fill the bill 
single-strength. 

If you're using regular plastic bags, 
double or triple them so that each unit 
of your computer is air- and watertight. 
Put each component in its own bag 
(use zip-lock sandwich bags for the 
mouse and cables). 

Pack everything in at least one thick- 
ness of corrugated cardboard with the 
highest burst strength you can find. If 
you're also shipping clothing, it makes 
excellent packing material. 

Just pack your off-season clothing 
around the computer and save some 
boxes. With a computer, there's noth- 
ing to leak or rub off on your clothes. 

If you kept the cardboard inserts 
that came with your disk drives, re'in- 
serf them before moving the computer 
This prevents the read/write heads in a 
disk drive from knocking against each 
other. 

If you threw them away, cut a piece 
of cardstock about the width of a com- 
puter disk and a couple of Inches long- 
er (so you can pull it out) for each 
drive and insert that instead. Protect 
the keyboard from anything that might 
press on the keys. 

Pro Communication 

I enjoyed Tony Roberts's article on tel- 
ecommunications in the December is- 
sue. However, he macJe one small mis- 
take at the end w/hen he said that Pro- 
Comm Plus doesn't provide much infor- 
mation about errors. 

ProComm Plus creates an error file 
with the same name as the script file 
but with an ERR extension. This file 
will tell you what line in the script con- 
tains the error. It also contains informa- 
tion about the nature of the error, such 
as NO ENDPROC or INVALID TOKEN. 

CHET MILLER 
GREAT FALLS. MT 



Readers whose letters appear in "Feed- 
back" will receive a free CO!<APUTE's 
PC clock radio while supplies last. Do 
you have a question about hardware or 
software? Or have you discovered 
something that could help other PC us- 
ers? If so, we want to hear from you. 
Write to COMPUTES Feedback, 324 
West Wendover Avenue, Suite 200, 
Greensboro, North Carolina 27408. We 
regret that we cannot provide person- 
al replies to technical questions. D 




Dr. Schueler's 

Home Medical 
Advisor 

COMPUTER PROGRAM 




l^riHnHEq|-:i| .1 uli:^ 



Send your computer to medical school and 
access updated info on self care, symptom 
analysis, and preventative medicine, 

il 




Using color grapfilcs Dr. Schueler's takes your 
medical history and analyzes your symptoms. 



^H 


.>W^,' 


I^HPj 


HH^ 


Bllln HiMllr.il :Vlvi-,,,r ^1 



Conceived and designed over a two-year 
period by an Emergency Physician and a 
team of over 40 Phiyslcian Specialists. 

i 




H!iil-Iil.:li:ii|i'..i|ir;i| h|.ii| 



The Home Medical Advisor contains vast 
databases on pediatric and adult diseases, 
poisons, drug info, injuries, and medical tests. 



Only 



^69 



95 



PC ■ Hard Disk 
EGA or VGA 



vSr See your Software 



Dealer or call 

1-800-788-2099 

PIXEL PERFECT, IIXJC. 

10460 S. Tropical Tr., Merritt Island, FL 32952 



Circle Reader Service Number 169 



TIPS & TOOLS 



Edited by Richard C. Leinecl<er 



Protect your 

computer, checl{suni 

COMPUTE'S 

DEBUG scripts, and 

mucti more. 



Checking DEBUG Codes 

We've started a tradition of 
publishing small COM pro- 
grams that you cari type in us- 
ing DOS's DEBUG program. 
It can be a challenge to get 
them right, though, since you 
are entering pure machine 
code in hexadecimal form. 

Here's a program that will 
give you a checksum value 
for a COM file. Each DEBUG 
example we publish from now^ 
on w/ill have a checksum val- 
ue given. To use the pro- 
gram, just type CHECKSUM 
FILENAME.COM. and it'll 
give you a three-digit value. 
Compare this number to the 
number printed in the maga- 
zine. If it's different, then you 
have an error in your typing. If 
it's the same, chances are 
pretty good that you haven't 
made any errors typing it in, 

Before you try to create 
this program, make sure the 
DOS program called DEBUG 
is in your path or the current di- 
rectory. In these examples 
the italic text is what the com- 
puter prints: the roman text is 
Vk'hat you should type. One 
Vifay to be sure you get these 
programs exactly right is to 
have someone read the num- 
bers to you as you type them 
in. Another way suggested by 
one of our readers is to read 
the numbers into a tape re- 
corder and then play them 
back as you enter the pro- 
gram code. 

DEBUG CHECKSUM. COM 
File not iounci 

-e100 be 80 00 ac Oa cO 74 64 

-e108 ac 3c Od 74 5f 3c 20 74 

-e 110 il 8b d6 4a ac 3c Dd 74 

-e 118 04 3c 20 75 f7 c6 44 If 

-e 120 00 bf 70 01 2b 16 bS 00 

-e 128 3d cd 21 72 3f 3b dS Sb 

-e 130 d7 bS 01 00 b4 3f cd 21 

-e 138 8a 05 03 10 Ob cO 75 ef 

-e 140 b4 3e cd 21 81 e6 ft 00 

-e 148 bb 64 00 8b c6 2b d2 17 

'6 150 J3 04 30 88 05 Bb f2 8b 

-e 158 d7 b4 09 cd 21 2b d2 8b 

-e 160 c3 bb Oa 00 f7 f3 8b dS 



-e168 Ob db 75 d( b4 4c cd 21 

-e170 00 24 

-RCX 

a 0000 

:72 

-W 

Writing 0072 bytes 

■Q 

Test it out. The checksum you 
get for CHECKSUM.COM 
should be 062, 

RICHARD C. LEINECKER 
MIAMI, FL 

Easy Security 

If you worry about your PC 
while you're away from it, 
there may be an easy way to 
keep people from accessing 
your computer when it's left 
running without supervision. 
This program waits for you to 
press the F4 key. It won't re- 
spond to any other key, even 
the Ctrl-Alt-Delete combina- 
tion. You can put it in your 
AUTOEXEC.BAT file for a sim- 
ple password system. 

DEBUG PASSW0RD.COM 

File not found 

-e10Q b8 09 35 cd 21 89 1e 50 

-e108 01 8c 06 52 01 b8 09 25 

-e11D ba 2d 01 cd 21 83 3e 54 

-e118 01 00 74 19 8b 16 50 01 

-e120 8e 1e 52 01 b8 09 25 cd 

-e128 21 b4 4c cd 21 50 e4 60 

-e130 3c 3e 75 Oc 1e 8c c8 8e 

-e138 d8 c7 06 54 01 01 00 1f 

-e140 e4 61 Oc 80 e6 61 24 7f 

-e148 e6 61 bO 20 e6 20 58 cl 

-e150 00 00 00 00 00 00 

-RCX 

CX 0000 

:56 

-W 

Writing 0056 bytes 

-Q 

The checksum for this pro- 
gram should be 147, 

You can change it to ac- 
cept any function key. Find 
the second hex number in the 
line that starts -e 130. Its val- 
ue is 3e. Change this value to 
anything you want. Remem- 
ber, though, this isn't an AS- 



CII code but a raw scan 
code from the keyboard. 
Here are the values for func- 
tion keys 1-10. 

F1 3b F6 40 

F2 3c F7 41 

F3 3d F8 42 

F4 3e F9 43 

F5 31 F10 44 

THOMAS E. HINES lil 
KANSAS CITY, MO 

More Printer Control 

Several months ago we fea- 
tured a couple of DEBUG pro- 
grams that let you send con- 
trol codes to your printer. 
Since then we've developed 
some batch files to do the 
same thing. 

Here's one called FF.BAT 
that sends a form feed to the 
printer. To create this file, 
type COPY CON FF.BAT and 
press Enter. Type eciio and 
press the space bar. Hold 
down the Left-Shift and Left- 
Alt keys while you type 1 then 
2 on the numeric keypad. 
Type the > character and 
then prn. Press Enter to end 
the line. Then press F6 and En- 
ter to create the file. 

Make sure this batch file is 
in your path or the current di- 
rectory and type FF. When 
run. it sends a fomni feed to 
your printer. 

You can send any single 
code or combination of 
codes to your printer. Some 
of the more common ones 
are a carriage return (ASCII 
value 13) and a linefeed (AS- 
CII value 10). 

Consult your printer manu- 
al for other useful codes like 
the one for setting the printer 
to near letter quality or the 
one for setting it to one of its 
built-in fonts. Once you've 
made your list of control 
codes, you can combine 
them into one big batch file. 
Here's a simple example 
called PCODES.BAI Where 
you see {CHARACTER 121, 
hold down the Left-Shift and 



42 COMPUTE JULY 1992 



niey're Not Even In Our League. 




10/ipf*^ 



^Q^^ 




,f 




< Unnraled )vaHsin 
in enem detail fiv?n 
unpreiidabk bail 
bounas, diviftg 
tackles ami 
audibles, to NFL 
draft, trades, 
and digitized 
gridiron somuis. 



Introducing a new football dynasty. NFL from Konami' It 
does more than out-class the competition. It gives you depth, 
detail and authentic NFL action that's in a league by itseUT 

ik NFL features all 28 league teams, plus bigger rosters than any other game. 

a Only NFL has realtime play action with fluid, life-like player animation. Not clumsy and stiff like the competition. 

ifr Only NFL gives you 10 player attributes plus 6 vital statistics for every player, more than John Madden n 

or Mike Ditka Ultimate Football, 

Only NFL can call 22 different penalties. 



a 

* 



Use the Playbook to execute your game plan. Or aeate and practice your own offensive and defensive plays. 
choosing from 72 variables with irmBons of combinations. 

Play pre-season games, run a training camp, 
or play an entire Super Bowl season viith 
divisional, NFC and AFC playoffe. 

Instant replay with VCR interfece, and TV 
broadcast style scoring updates from around 
the NFL 

Available Spring 1992 for MS-DOS. 

< Extensive statistics including half-time and 
end-ofgame scoring summaries, end-ofgame 
team and player stats, phts season stats 
for each player 




Teain name? antj Iggos 
are the Tcgislcrert 

and learns tirj.^U'\J, 

M]ffiDnKAL'LTIWE 

fOOTBALLii.i 

"COTBALL ar.J FASi. 

Bcnronic Art^. Konami 
a rcgiMrco tradcmart 
i)!K!irisri„Co IM 
. ■>■>? kifijir'l 
-■I ?■ ry-, Rcs^r^te 




KONAMI 



circle Reader Service Number 132 



TIPS & TOOLS 



Weld more powerful 

printer controls, 

slice your hard disk 

up to 23 ways, 

and create decorative 

LaserJet fonts. 



Left-Alt keys while you type / 
then 2 on the numeric key- 
pad. Where you see {CHAR- 
ACTER 10}, hold down the 
Left-Shift and Left-Alt keys 
while you type 1 then Don the 
numeric keypad. 

©ECHO OFF 

IF %1==FF GOTO FORMFEED 

IF %1=ff GOTO FORMFEED 

IF %1=LF GOTO LINEFEED 

IF %1=lf GOTO LINEFEED 

IF %1=DP GOTO PRINTDIR 

IF %1=(lp GOTO PRINTDIR 

ECHO. 

ECHO To use this batch file, type 

ECHO PCODES and what you want 

ECHO to send to the printer. 

ECHO Here's what's available in 

ECHO this batch file. 

ECHO . 

ECHO FF for form feed 

ECHO LF for linefeed 

ECHO DP tor printing the directory 

ECHO . 

GOTO END 

:FORMFEED 

ECHO {CHARACTER 12) > PRN 

GOTO END 

rLINEFEED 

ECHO {CHARACTER 101 > PRN 

GOTO END 

:PRINTDIR 

DIR > PAN 

:END 

COMPUTE EDITORS 
GREENSBORO, NC 

Drives from A to Z 

How would you like to have 
all of your word-processing 
files on drive E, games on F, 
and BASIC programs on G? 
When you first organized 
your hard disk, you sectioned 
things off using subdirecto- 
ries. Now you can make navi- 
gating your system even easi- 
er by using the SUBST com- 
mand to trick DOS into think- 
ing those subdirectories are 
separate drives. 

First, decide the highest 
drive letter that you'll be us- 
ing. If it's higher than E, you'll 
need to add a line to the CON- 
FIG.SYS file. Suppose that M 
will be the highest drive spec- 



ification you want to use. (2 is 
the absolute maximum.) Call 
up your CONFIG.SYS file in a 
text editor. Save a copy of the 
file as CONFIG. OLD, in case 
something goes wrong. At the 
end of the file, type LASJ- 
DRIVE=M and press Enter. 
Save the file as CONFIG.SYS. 
Now you must reboot. 

You can define the drives 
using the SUBST command. 
Suppose you want F: to refer 
to your WordStar subdirecto- 
ry. Type SUBST F: C:\WS and 
press the Enter key. Typing 
DIR F: wilt now give you a di- 
rectory of the WS subdirecto- 
ry. Many other commands be- 
sides DIR, such as COPY 
and DELETE, will work with 
the F drive. 

To create your new drives 
automatically when your sys- 
tem boots, add the SUBST 
commands to your AUTOEX- 
EC.BAT to specify the aliases. 

Several DOS commands 
won't work with a substituted 
drive. They are ASSIGN, FOR- 
MAT BACKUP, RESTORE, LA- 
BEL, JOIN, DISKCOPY DISK- 
COMP, and FDISK. 

RICHARD C. LEINECKER 
MIAMI, FL 

Making Headlines 

One of the drawbacks of ear- 
ly LaserJet compatibles is 
that they can't print fonts big- 
ger than 30 points. The later 
models, up through Series II, 
can print bigger fonts but re- 
quire huge soft font files to do 
so. Before I bought my first 
PostScript printer, I had to re- 
linquish over half of my mea- 
ger 40MB hard disk to soft 
fonts — for just three type 
styles! An alternative to get- 
ting squeezed out of your 
hard disk is creating head- 
lines and decorative fonts in 
your graphics paint or draw 
program. CorelDRAW!, Design- 
er, Arts & Letters, Illustrator, 
Paintbrush, and several other 
graphics programs come 
with an assortment of fonts 



that can be scaled to almost 
any size. You can also 
shade, shape, or color the 
text. If, for example, you want- 
ed to create a headline in 
Arts & Letters for inclusion in 
a PageMaker document, all 
you'd have to do is create the 
headline as a graphic ele- 
ment; save it to a common 
file format such as TIF, PCX, 
or CGM; and import it into 
PageMaker. Another option 
would be to bring the graphic 
into your document on the Win- 
dows Clipboard, Say you 
want to place a graphic from 
CorelDRAW! into Ventura Pub- 
lisher. Here's how: Create 
your headline in CorelDRAW!, 
select it with the mouse, and 
place it on the Clipboard with 
the Copy command on the Ed- 
it menu. Open both Ventura 
Publisher and the document in- 
to which you want to place 
the headline. Create a frame 
for the graphic and then 
choose Paste Metafile from 
the Edit menu. Ventura will 
ask you to name the graphic 
file. After you name the file, it 
will appear in your documenL 
You can then size, crop, col- 
or, or place your headline as 
you like. Using a graphics pro- 
gram to create the text also al- 
lows you to treat the text as a 
graphic. For example, Co- 
relDRAW! allows you to ex- 
trude your text or put a gradi- 
ent or vector fill in it, 

WILLIAM HARREL 
VENTURA. CA 



// you have an interesting tip 
that you think would help oth- 
er PC users, send it along 
with your name, address, and 
Social Security number to 
COMPUTE'S Tips & Tools, 
324 West Wendover Avenue, 
Suite 200, Greensboro. North 
Carolina 27408. For each tip 
we publish, we 'II pay you $25- 
$50 and send you a COM- 
PUTE'S PC clock radio while 
supplies last. B 



44 COMPUTE JULY 1992 



Become a legend before 
your own time. 




what becomes a legend most? Find out for yourself as 
you pilot the legendary B-17 Flying Fortress and lead a 
1 0-man crew through the same flak-infested skies that 
menaced the legendary flyboys of the Memphis Belle. 

The most complete and accurate bomber simulation 
ever produced, the B-1 7 Flying Fortress will have you 
negotiating 25 perilous daylight missions over Nazi- 
occupied Europe. 

You'll allocate crew members to their specific tasks. 
You'll devastate strategic targets in dangerous bombing 
runs. You'll take control of crew positions from pilot to 
bombardier. And you'll even customize your own Flying 
Fortress with historically accurate nose art. 

So pick up your copy of B-1 7 Flying Fortress today. And 
experience a flight simulation of legendary proportions. 



Actual' screens may va/y. 



A^PROSE 

ENTERTAINMENT • SOFTWARE 

For IBM PC compatibles! 

For more information about exciting MicroProse products, 
ca[l1-800-879-PLAY 

© 1992 MicroProse Software, Inc. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. 



Ctrcle Reader Service Number 225 



POINT & CLICK 



Clifton Karnes 



Cleaning up after 

Windows installaUon 

programs is 

simpler than you'd 

expect 



WINDOWS APPS: 
BEFORE AND AFTER 

Not long ago each PC program 
came in a single COM file, less 
than 64K in size. You didn't re- 
ally install a program in those 
days— you just copied it to a 
floppy disk and ran it. 

The next level in size escala- 
tion came when programs 
started to require overlays, 
which allowed parts of a pro- 
gram to be shuttled in and out 
of memory as needed. And 
as programs became more 
complicated, additional sup- 
port files for printing and vari- 
ous other things were added. 
To install these programs that 
occupied several files, you 
simply copied all the files on 
the distribution disks to your 
hard drive. 

Things are not so simple in 
Windows-land. Windows apps 
can use scores of files, and the 
installation programs are notori- 
ously sloppy about distributing 
these files all over your hard 
disk as wel! as making chang- 
es to your CONFIG.SYS, AU- 
TOEXEC.BAT WIN. INI, SYS- 
TEM. INI, or all four. 

Typically, a program will de- 
posit its main files in a special 
subdirectory {or group of sub- 
directories) it creates on your 
hard disk, and it will add an 
INI file to your Windows sub- 
directory. It may also add a 
file or two to your SYSTEM 
subdirectory. And it will prob- 
ably alter your AUTOEX- 
EC.BAT (to include itself on 
your already bulging path), per- 
haps add a driver or two to 
your SYSTEM.INI or CON- 
FIG.SYS files, and almost cer- 
tainly make some entries to 
your WIN. INI file. 

There's really no problem 
with all of this until you want to 
get rid of one of these pro- 
grams. Where are all the files? 
And what changes were 
made to your system files that 
you need to undo? 



Because Windows pro- 
grams tend to install files in so 
many subdirectories and alter 
so many files, each program 
should have its own uninstall 
option. I've never seen one 
that does, however. 

Here's a solution. With the 
two batch files listed below, 
called Before and After, you 
can create a list of all the 
changes a program makes 
when it installs itself. 

The principle is simple. You 
run Before before you install 
any new software. It makes a 
list of every file on your hard 
disk. To this list it appends the 
contents of your CONFIG SYS, 
AUTOEXEC.BAT WIN. INI, and 
SYSTEM.INI files. 

Next you install your soft- 
ware, and after you've fin- 
ished, you run After. The first 
thing After does is make a list 
of all the files on your system 
and the contents of your sys- 
tem files, just like Before has 
done. But this list includes the 
files added by the program 
you've just installed as well as 
any changes made to your sys- 
tem files. Next, After com- 
pares the list it's just made 
with Before's list. Any files add- 
ed or deleted from your sys- 
tem show up in the compari- 
son, as welt as any changes to 
your system files. 

Here's the listing for BE- 
FORE.BAT: 

@echo off 

els 

c: 

cd Windows 

echo [BEFORE] Recording files on 
disk (this will tal<e a while) . . . 

chkdsk/v >c:snapstiol.tmp 

echo [BEFORE] Checking system 
files . . . 

copy c:snapshot.tmp + c:\autoex- 
ec.bat + c:\canfig.sys + 
c:\windaws\win.ini + c:\win- 
dows'Vsystem.ini c:before.txt 
>nul 

echo [BEFORE] Cleaning up . . . 

erase c:snapshot.tmp 

cd\ 



The CHKDSK command with 
the V switch isn't used very of- 
ten, but it's great for us. It 
causes CHKDSK to list every 
file on the disk with its com- 
plete path. We redirect its out- 
put to SNAPSHOTTMP. 

The next step is to append 
the system files to SNAP- 
SHOTTMP and store the com- 
plete list in a new file, BE- 
FORE.TXT. Now we have a 
snapshot of our system before 
we install a new program. 

Here's the listing for AF- 
TER.BAT: 

©echo off 

it "7o1" == "" goto end 

els 

c: 

cd Xwindows 

echo [ARER] Recording files on 

disk (this will take a while) . . . 
chkdsk/v >c:snapshot.tmp 
echo [ARER] Checking system 

files . . . 
copy c:snapstiat.tmp + c:\autoex- 

ecbat + c:'\config.sys -i- 

c:\windows'\win.ini -t- 

cAwlndows\system.ini 

ctafler.txt >nul 
erase c:snapshot.tmp 
echo [ARER] Checking for 

changes . . . 

fc c:hefore.txt c:af1er.txt >c:%1 
type %1 I more 
goto stop 
:end 
echo Please specify a filename for 

the changes. 
:stop 

When you run After, you'll 
need to specify a filename for 
the changes it finds. 

The first few lines of After 
do just what Before does — 
they make a snapshot of your 
system. 

The line fc c: before.txt c:af- 
ter.txt >c:%1 compares the 
two snapshots and puts the re- 
sults in the file you specified 
on the command line. 

You can then use the file 
created by After to locate the 
files introduced and altered 
by the installation. □ 



46 COMPUTE JULY 1992 



How this $149 software will: 
1 y Improve the way you work and thinkl 
21 Instantly find the info you need, and 
3) Help you make brilliant decisions ... 






%:% 



s^xr^. 



The next generation 
of TORNADO 

is here at 

last! 



Surprisingly. ihoE is a whole new 
world of uses for your computer! 
You can use yourcomputer to deal 
with all the countless bits of ""random" 
informallon scattered across your desk: 
plans, notes. lisLs. actions, coniacLs. ideas. 




and much more. INFO SELECT™ will 
not only give you instant access to this 
important information ... it will help you 
inukc tieUcr decisions and sec inipoitant 
new relation.ship;.. Try INFO SELECT 
risk-free and discover a whole new 
dimension of compuiing. 

Photographic 
memory 

INFO SELECT is like having a 

'photographic memory' that gives you 
perfect superfasi recall of up to 64.000 
items of infonriation. 

Telephone notes 

When Harry calls you on Ihc phone, 
you'll dispby the six windows on Harry 
before he finishes his first senlenceJ No 
more embarru-ssing pauses or scrambling 
for in formal ill n. 

INFO 
SELECT also 
includes the 
woricJ^s fiisf 
"3-D" word 
processor. 
You'll be 
amazed at how it 
works. 

Instead of 
one window or 
len, imagine up to 64,000! The uses are 
endless. 




INFOSELECri.sea.sy 
lo use ■ yet ptwcrful. 



Are you forgetful? 

Were you bom with a miemory 
sLluaied squarely on Lhe lip of your 
tongue'.' Do you forget things like which 
day you placed an ordtr or imponani 
numbers".' If you are forgetful you 
especially need INFO SELECT - the 
software thai remembers almosi 
everything for you. 

Thinking tool 

Have you ever worked on a complex 
prujcct and fell lost? With INFO 
SELECT you 'I! group, scan, and cross 
search through all your notes so fast 
you'll see the big ptaurs in seconds. 

Will I be baieroff doing this now or 
thai laier? Keeping priorities straight can 
make or break your career or your 
business. INFO SELECT lets you keep 
on lop of what's hot. 

Should you u.se an east or west coast 
supplier? To make decisions you need 
facts. Now you can view the facts any 
way you like >., iis fast as you can think. 
You' 11 tiiake the best decisions ever -- 
and fewer expensive mistakes. 

The #1 PIM 

What's all the fuss 
about PIMs (Persona! 
Information 
Mangers)? 

O Simple - you 
probably have 
more RANDOM 
information than 
any other type and 
you need a PFM to 
properly handle 
this kind of 
irifomiation. The 
right PIM will 
siivc you time and 
make everything 
you do go 
s moot hi y. 

Why is info 
SeIeaihe#lPIM? 
Because Info Select is based 
on ideas you can identify 
"""''^""" ' with - like stacks of paper. 

And it's free-form too. You 
won't waste days or weeks learning 
complex struLiuars. Instc^ you'll be up 
and running in minutes. Info Select also 
does more and costs less than other PIMs. 





Phone noies 



Client infii 




Owners 4jf nuf TOEWADO software (symboliznl 

by the famous '^tuc tornado") can trade up to thfr 

second-generation Fnfo Select under our special 

offer- Tlierc an; over 200 improve mcnis. 

Feature packed 

INFO SELECT is memory resident 
(if you chotMie). so you can quickly jump 
in from other programs. Info Select 
windows can hold: notes, pJans, lists, 
facts, letters, contacts, and much more. 
You can .search for a window or a group 
of windows related by a word or phra.'ic. 
Inhere arc five ways io see overviews; 
hypertext, a fast sort, and line drawing. 
Save time with the dialer, date ticklo': 
and searching by text or date ranges. 

Info Select allows 
you to: add 
columns of 
numbers; store 
data in EMS; use 
template or 
free- form 
windows: impon 
and export files, 
screens, and 
databases; move, 
|oin, and duplicate 
windows and 
much more. 




If youhavc nt^L'^ 
or other unorgani/ro KAM>.JM 
inrorma.tkjn. jou need Info Select. 



LAN 
option 



ro^pS'l PCM 



■^n7T?n 




njii 


ISSSH 


cHsm 



"Rarely do I 
recommend a 
product as 
wholeheartedty" 
David Harvey, 
Comp. Shopper 



'Beats the pants 
off just about 
everylNng else.' 
Jeflrey Pariter, 



'As easy as 
remernbering 
your own name.' 
Patrick Marshall. 
Info World 



EtStor's Choice 
'Rrsl rale' 
PC Magazine 



The new LAN version allows 
integrated E-mail, sharing company 
rolodexcs and distributing company 
policies. You can share any kind of 
information. It's your first step into the 
exciting new world of groupware! Ask 
about lhe five mxlc LAN starter pack. 

Easy power 

info Select is easy lo use yet offers 
lhe power you need with infobases up to 
1 megabytes: test searches up to 
TOOkb/scc; up to 32.000 chaiscteri per 
window: and up to frl.tXJO windows per 
infohasc. Even hctter. Info Select can 
swap down to as little a."* 7K memory! 

TORNADO owners 

INFO SELECT is based on lhe 
pioneering TORNADO™ software PC 
World called "Excellent. Excellent. 
E.KCelleni, iixcellenl" and PC Maga/.inc 
awanled liditor's Choice - twice. Call 
about our special trade-up offer. 



l^a:v: 






Endless 
uses 

Info Select can 
do much TTHjre than manage 
all your RANDOM 
information. Use it to 
manage business correspondence, sales 
leads, orders, and client notes. Track 
facts, plan projects, or intcnelate all your 
ideas. You can catalogue parts, 
d(M:umenIs. and inventory itcm.s. Match 
buyers and sellers or doctor; and palienls. 
Setup an information desk. Edit E-mail. 
Store nines on magazine articles, 
software operation techniques, or just 
names and addresses. Whether you are a 
lawyer tracking court cases or a zoologist 
collecting feeding habits youll find 
countless uses for Info Select 




Info Select keeps your infonuatioii in inielligi 
automalically positional windows. 



Risk-Free Guarantee 

1 nfo Sclcci: is so efFeelive you will be 

ama/trd. Tliut's why we offer our 

mRTicy-back guarrjiicc, Tt>' it for 30 days. 

If you iire nol ful iy sa[i:ifie!l. ^tx-Kpt our full 

prompt refund. Could arjy offer fx; rnort 

fyir? 



All for just ^^^. 

$149.95! Ver2.01 

INf-0 SELECT has a special price of 
just S 1-49.95. You can even try it 
risk-free with a 3Q-day money back 
guarantee. But hurry - this is a limited 
time offer. 

l!)oesii"t it make sense to gel the 
software package thai can open up a 
whole new world of important uses for 
yourcomputer? Order today. Call 
lotl-fnre: 

(800)342-5930 

... and get ready for a rtew dimension 
of computing. 

POB 70, Dept. A608 

Hachensack, NJ 07602 

(800) 342-5930 (201) 342-6518 

Fax: (201) 342-0370 



Makers of: Tornado, Info Select, 
Key Watcl} & Micro Cfrarts 



M.ilL.ORnHRS; Send name, addiess. pNjne number, and luymcnl b.v chcc!,. Visa, or MClo address shown. Plea.'ii: inciade S3J0s)lipping (SIS auuidcconlinental USAl. EUROPEAN CUSTOMERS: 
Ciiiitatl .Mbnltx U.S.A. (»}) 655-6980. TOAMMlVRKS: Trjtlcmarii (<iwneT): Timado. Info Select. Key WaKh (Micro Ijjpic). IBM PC XT. AT. Kfi llBMl. © 1990 Micro Logie Cwp. U.S.A. 



COMPUTE/NET 



Troy Tucker 



Online services 

can easily 

banspoft you to a 

woild where 

Information is l<ing. 



THE PERFECT TIME 
TO GH ONLINE 

If you're new to the online 
scene, then you'll be pleased 
to learn that COMPUTE 
resides on both GEnie and 
America Online. Our section is 
called COMPUTE/NET, and in 
it you'll find the same high- 
quality programs and articles 
that you enjoy in our maga- 
zine. If you're not online yet, 
then you probably don't know 
what you're missing. 

Online services have much 
to offer you. Subscribers enjoy 
instant access to news, weath- 
er, travel, stocks, reviews, soft- 
ware, and more. You'll find the 
rates very reasonable, too. 
You can sign on to GEnie for 
free and access the basic serv- 
ices during nonprime time 
hours for about $4.95 a 
month. America Online offers 
free software, a free trial mem- 
bership, and free connect 
time so you can try out their 
service. The rate for basic serv- 
ices on America Online is 
$5.95 a month. So, if you're 
not online-get online. And, 
don't forget to visit us when 
you do. 

This month in COMPUTE/ 
NET we're featuring a few da- 
ta management utilities that 
we think you'll enjoy. We have 
a super spreadsheet called 
QubeCalc, a file viewer called 
List64, and an incredible da- 
tabase program called PC Da- 
ta Control. We also have sev- 
eral games such as: Ed's 
Chess, Mah Jongg, Hearts, 
and Bass Tour. 

You'll find QubeCalc quite 
useful. It's a low-cos! spread- 
sheet alternative that doesn't 
skimp on features. You can 
store all kinds of data in row, 
column, and page format. You 
can calculate across, up, 
down, and through other 
spreadsheets that you create 
by linking modules together. 
This powerful program in- 



cludes sixty functions, mac- 
ros, sorting, context-sensitive 
help, and graphics. 

List64 is an excellent multi- 
purpose file viewer. It lets you 
search files for text, mark and 
write selected text, and clean 
up files written in nontext for- 
mats. You move around in the 
documents with all of the usu- 
al commands. It features on- 
line help, a ruler, a hex dis- 
play, and it even allows you to 
customize the colors. 

Our last feature program is 
PC Data Control. With it, you 
can create large databases. 
You can sort, calculate totals, 
create reports, and search as 
many as 25 parameters at 
once using wildcards, values, 
ranges. You can opt for case- 
sensitive searches, too. It 
even autodials numbers, if 
your computer is equipped 
with a modem. 

Ed's Chess is a challenging 
chess game. The playing piec- 
es are drawn with character 
graphics, so almost anyone 
can play. Mah Jongg is a clas- 
sic strategy puzzle game that 
will have you happily per- 
plexed for hours. Avid bass fish- 
ermen will want to be sure to 
downloaad Bass Tour, an ex- 
cellent bass fishing simulator. 

Look for this month's fea- 
ture programs in our New 
Uploads library. When you en- 
ter the COMPUTE/NET area, 
just access this library to find 
the latest program uploads. 
Featured programs will reside 
in this library for a few weeks, 
then they'll be transferred to 
our main pc library. 

COMPUTE/NET has much 
more to offer than just soft- 
ware. Be sure to visit our prod- 
uct ordering section for the lat- 
est products. COMPUTE 
Books has added some new 
titles that you can purchase di- 
rectly online. Titles include 
Desktop Publishing with Geo- 
Works, Big Book of PC Sports, 
Castlevania: The Official Hint 
Book, Official Guide to Sid 



Meir's Civilization, and more. 

Ordering is simple. First, go 
to the COMPUTE/NET section. 
Use the keyword COMPUTE, 
If you're on America Online, 
click on the Product Ordering 
icon, then select COMPUTE 
Books. You'll see all of the ti- 
tles available. Select one of 
the titles to get a description 
and the price. Jot down the or- 
der number of the books that 
interest you, then return to the 
main Product Ordering menu. 
Click on the Order a Product 
icon and fill out the order 
form. For GEnie users, select 
option 9 from the menu, then 
select COMPUTE Books by 
pressing option 3. You'll see a 
description of each book and 
its price. Then you'll see a 
prompt to order the book or 
move on to the next book. 

For those of you who visit 
COMPUTE/NET on America 
Online, I have a surprise for 
you. COMPUTE/NET is getting 
a whole new look and feel. 
We're re-structuring the entire 
area so that it's much easier to 
navigate. You'll be able to 
quickly find all the information 
you're looking for. The col- 
umns and reviews will be bro- 
ken down into more special- 
ized categories. We'll be add- 
ing new things, too. Look for 
our color logo and exclusive 
chat area. We hope to have 
most of these changes in ef- 
fect by the time you read this, 
so stop in and take a look. 

We're working hard to meet 
your online needs. If you have 
any questions, comments, or 
suggestions about COMPUTE/ 
NET, please feel free to write 
to me here al COMPUTE Pub- 
lications in Greensboro or 
send E-mail. My GEnie ad- 
dress is TROYGT, and my 
America Online screen name 
is TROY GT— that's with a ze- 
ro. I'm on both services daily, 
and I'm looking forward to hear- 
ing from you. Don't forget to 
stop in and visit COMPUTE/ 
NET. See you online! D 



48 COMPUTE JULY 1992 



ON DISK 



Tony Roberts 



ORGANIZE YOUR 
HARD DRIVE 

This issue's PC Disk offers you 
a computer system tuneup. 
You'll be able to defragment 
your hard disk, tune your cach- 
ing software, copy high-capac- 
ity disks in a single pass, and 
keep close tabs on disk, mem- 
ory, and environment space. 
WinPost lets Windows us- 
ers create computerized yel- 
low sticky notes, and Switcher 
makes changing screen res- 
olutions a snap. 

Disk Organizer 

After a hard disk has been 
used for a few months, some 
of its luster seems to fade. Ac- 
cess to files becomes slug- 
gish and labored. 

This is a result of the way 
DOS stores files. Over time 
files become fragmented, or 
spread out across the disk. 
DOS keeps a road map to 
these fragmented files, so it 
has no problem locating 
them, but access time may 
be increased. 

To bring a fragmented 
hard disk back up to speed, 
you use a software tool 
called a defragmenter. Disk Or- 
ganizer, from Soft GAM'S Soft- 
ware, is just such a tool. 

Disk Organizer straightens 
up your hard disk by moving 
files and directories into opti- 
mal positions. Disk Organizer 
includes several switches and 
modes that permit you to spec- 
ify how the defragmentation 
and subsequent testing 
should occur. 

But first, a word of warning. 
As the program itself will tell 
you, back up your data first. 
Defragging a disk involves 
moving files and rewriting the 
disk's FAT (File Allocation Ta- 
ble). Normally, all goes well, 
but it's possible for unusual 
hardware, TSR conflicts, or nat- 
ural disaster to upset the proc- 
ess. Be sure to have back- 






'i U",EEKBI 



ups. Also, if you use disk-com- 
pression software, follow the 
manufacturer's advice about 
defragmenting compressed 
volumes. 

Allen Morris's Disk Organiz- 
er is shareware and carries a 
$30 registration fee. A good 
defragger has a place in 
everyone's software library. 

Cache Test 

Disk-caching programs are 
one of today's most popular 
performance enhancers. Every- 
one running Windows uses 
one, and DOS users can 
speed up their systems by set- 
ting up disk caches. Disk cach- 
es really make a difference if 

you run disk- 

intensive pro- 
grams such as 
database man- 
agers. 

The big ques- 
tion, though, is 
how much me n> 
ory to allocate 
to the cache. 
The idea is to 
achieve the 
greatest per- 
formance gain 
for the small- 
est amount of 
memory. George Spafford 
faced this problem with the 
computers at his office and cre- 
ated Cache Test to help him 
determine the Best settings. 

Using the program is sim- 
ple. Set up your cache, run 
the program, and record the 
results. Then adjust the 
cache and test again until 
you discover what works best 
for your specific system. 

Cache Test is shareware 
and can be registered for $5. 

CPYDSK 

I've yet to meet anyone who 
enjoys the disk swapping 
that's required to copy a high- 
density disk. All that aggrava- 
tion sfiouldn't be necessary, 
and now, thanks to CPYDSK, 
your swapping days are over! 



With a normal DISKCOPY 
floppy shuffling is necessary 
because DOS cannot access 
enough memory to make the 
complete copy in a single 
pass. CPYDSK skirts this prob- 
lem by using your hard disk 
as a temporary storage area 
if memory runs short. 

Copies can be made in a 
single pass, and what's 
more, multiple copies can be 
created with only one reading 
of the source disk. CPYDSK al- 
so can speed your work by 
copying only live data. 

CPYDSK is shareware cre- 
ated by Rawis Frazier and 
Mark Ferrei. The registration 
fee is only $10. 



i 



!?!™?'?=j!-«5«.. 



Writing 
Your Way 
To Power 
IntKe 
Workplace 



e 



i*Ja 



iw I H J 



Spate 

Ever wonder how much disk 
space is left? Space offers a 
unique look at available disk 
space, Space creates a graph- 
ic display of disk use for one 
or more drives. If multiple 
drives are specified, statistics 
are provided for the combina- 
tion of all the drives as well as 
for each drive individually. 

The program also can pro- 
vide visual and auditory warn- 
ings if disk space falls below 
user-specified percentages. 
These warning points can be 
specified for each drive individ- 
ually as well as for the combi- 
nation of all drives. 

Space, programmed by 
loannis Hadjiionnou, is share- 
ware. Space can be regis- 
tered for only $10. 



WinPosI lets you 
create and manage 
up to lOfl little 
yellow Post-lt-type 
notes, and 
they don't (all olt! 



JULY 1992 COMPm"E 49 



ON DISK 



FOR SfNGLE DISKS 

YES! I want !o power up my PC. Send me this issue's COMPUTE'S 

PC Disk. I'll pay S9.95 for each 5V4-inch or 3V?-!nch disk plus S2.00 
shipping and handling per dislii. 

Please indicate how many disks of each foimal you'd like: 

5V4-inch disks at S9.95 each 

3' /2-inch disks at $9.95 each 

Subtotal 

Sales tax (Ftesidents of NC and NY, please add appropriate 

sales tax for your area. Canadian orders, add 7% goods and 

services tax.) 
Shipping and handling ($2.00 U.S. and Canada, $3.00 

surface mail. $5.00 airmail per disk) 
Total enclosed 

Send your order to 

COMPUTE'S PC Disk 

324 W. Wendover Ave.. Sle. 200 

Greensboro, NC 27408 



SUBSCRIPTIONS 

I want 10 save even more! Start my one-year rnagazine and disk sub- 
scription to COf/PUTE's PC right away. 

5V-!-iriCh $49,95 per year 

3V?-inch $49-95 per year 

F^jr delivery outside the U.S. or Canada, add S10.00 for postage and 
handling. 

Name 



Address . 

City 



State/Province . 



ZIP/Postal Code . 
Total Enctosed _ 



Check or money order . 

MasterCard 

VISA 



Credit Card No. , 
Expiration Date - 
Signature 



Daytime Teleptione No. 

Send your order to 

COfi^PUTE's PC Disk 
P.O. Box 3244 
Harlan, lA 51539-2424 

Ail orders must be paid in U.S. funds by check drawn on a U.S. bank or by mon- 
ey order MasterCard or VISA accepted for orders over $20. This offer will be 
fined only at tf>e above address and is not made in conjunction witti any other 
magazine or dtslt-snbscription offer. Please alkjw 4-6 weeks for delivery of 
single issues or for subscnption to begir; Sony, t>ul telephone orders cannoi be 
accepted. 

Disks available only fof IBM PC and compatible computers. 
Offer good while supplies last 



WinPost 

WinPost is a Windows person- 
al ififormation manager that 
follows [he little-yellow-sticky- 
note metaptior. The program 
allows you to create and man- 
age up to too reminder 
notes. 

Each WinPost note can be 
colored and sized according 
to your desires, and each 
note offers full editing capabil- 
ities, including cut-and-paste 
options. Notes are created, 
modified, and viewed easily 
through menu selections, but 
all commands have keyboard 
equivalents to provide faster 
access. 

WinPost includes a layout 
feature, which allows you to 
group related notes into logi- 
cal categories, and an alarm 
feature, which allows you to 
create reminder notes that 
pop up onscreen at specified 
dates and times so you won't 
forget an appointment. 

Nobuya "Higgy" Hi- 
gashiyama, the creator of Win- 
Post, says the program was 
born as a Windows program- 
ming exercise. After his effort 
was enthusiastically received 
by friends and associates, he 
decided to make it available 
as shareware. WinPost car- 
ries a $30 registration fee. 

Swifcher 

Switcher gives Windows us- 
ers who frequently switch 
screen modes an ingenious 
way to save time and trouble. 
The program, from Robert Sa- 
lesas of Echalon Develop- 
ment, makes changing from 
16-colof to 256-color modes, 
or vice versa, a snap. 

To use the program, you 
simply teach Switcher what 
modes you regularly use. Af- 
ter that, just run the program, 
select the desired mode from 
a menu, and click on the Re- 
start Windows button. Switch- 
er handles the rest. 

All of this is much simpler — 
and far faster — than going 




CPYDSK 




Disk Organizer 





I^B 


■ 


ll -J 


9 


1 




1 


1 



space 

through the Windows Setup 
program. And there's an add- 
ed bonus for anyone who us- 
es a customized Windows 
startup screen. Switcher pre- 
serves your startup screen 
rather than reinstalling the Mi- 
crosoft logo screen. 

Switcher, which comes 
from the creators of WinCLI 
and other Windows software, 
is a free program. No registra- 
tion fee is required. n 



50 C0I\4PUTE JULY 1992 



■■■■«_ .-:■; }4^^t-^^A,:,-^i',~ 


,. , .A-*^*.'v%^ - IV '.,'>-v^ -:./.. -.■•-:■- 


\?TV''-i:-i|;"-'VM-^^:^:^i.- 


"'''-^Iffi^feSlpi^ 






f-^mm 






■:^rmm 



^r?*i 






'H{4r?s^ 



[ Tl^^inslaLccJ to the computer screen for the first time, you can now experience 







W. 



the exotic world of the bestselline science fiction 



i-'w'.jSj^7, -'.-y- >-;--^^>i:-, . 1)5 



falltime-DlJNE™! 



ijji-r^^ 









"V?.- 



j'^.r.-^iJiM 



^5^' 






:--V'i?'rS=^ 



m 












^^fefe'v^ 





DINE is a trfidemark of Dino De LaurentllsCorporaOoa^d licensed bj MG.Vl]nIver8a! Merchandtsin^ ; fac ' ': 
S 1981 DiaoDe LaurenUis Corporation. Ait rights peserved, 
©1992\'irg!n Games, InC. All rights re.serve(i 



Clrcfa Reedef Servlc* Numb«f 167 



PROGRAMMING POWER 



Tom Campbell 



TVHC Is surely 

a no-frills 

program, but It 

makes online 

help a Cakewalk. 



MAKE YOUR OWN 
ONLINE HELP 

This month we'll start off with 
a bang by transforming some 
Turbo Pascal example code 
from an interesting demo into 
a commercial-quality applica- 
tion. And it's all free for the 
downloading. 

One of my favorite addi- 
tions to Turbo Pascal 6.0 is the 
EDITORS unit; it lets you add 
a muliiwindow text editor with 
search and replace to your ap- 
plications by adding just a few 
lines of code. 

It suffers a couple of limita- 
tions: namely, there's no on- 
line help, and word-wrap isn't 
supported. This month on 
COMPUTE/NET you'll find solu- 
tions to both problems and an 
example of adding help to 
your application. 

The executable file size of 
the multiwindow editor TVED2 
is 1 1 1 K— not bad for an editor 
with state-of-the-art menus, 
snappy dialogs, multiple win- 
dows, hypertext help, search 
and replace, support for any 
wacky text mode you can 
throw at it, and word-wrap. 
(The self-extracting archive file 
TVED.EXE is quite large, as it 
also includes the source, help 
files, and documentation.) 

It all began as a communal 
project on CompuServe's 
BPROGA {Borland's Pascal fo- 
rum) late last year. Al Ander- 
son (ID 71610,3214) modified 
the EDITORS. PAS example 
file so that it supported word- 
wrap, and he requested volun- 
teers for testing and assembly 
language optimization. I dis- 
patched the latter in record 
time because it didn't need 
optimization: Al's code was so 
efficient that it didn't even 
show up on the profiler. 

I then foolishly offered to 
implement a help system 
based on the help engine pro- 
vided as one of the example 
files. In three hours, I had the 



code up and running; I wrote 
the text for the help system in 
another day and a half. I had 
the easy part: Al pulled yeoman 
duty and made his code availa- 
ble free, a remarkable gift de- 
serving special praise. 

Borland's documentation 
on both the editor and the 
help system is hard to come 
by. You have to scrape it out 
of obscurely named files in at 
least three directories, and 
depending on the manual's 
edition, you'll find little or no 
mention of it in print. That's be- 
cause Borland terms this "ex- 
ample" code. 

This column details the con- 
struction of an editor employ- 
ing online help and its help 
files. TVED.EXE repact^ages 
all the relevant information in 
one place; refer to the files 
TVED2.PAS and HELRDOG 
while reading. Even if you 
don't need a text editor, all of 
the lessons apply to any Tur- 
bo Vision application using on- 
line help. 

Following is an overview of 
the processes used to add hy- 
pertext help to your applica- 
tion; they're detailed step by 
step in READf\/IE.1 (the theo- 
ry) and TVED2.PAS (the 
implementation). 

First, you must write a help 
source file to run through 
TVHC. PAS, the help compiler. 
TVHC eats your source and 
spits out an indexed HLP file 
for your application to use at 
runtime and a PAS file you'll 
need at compile time. Here's 
a tiny help source file: .topic 
NoContext=0.h. To quit, hold 
down ALT and press X. 

The line .topic Save File- 
Save Save writes the docu- 
ment to a file on disk, See al- 
so (Save as...:SaveAsl. 

The line .topic SaveAs File- 
Save as . . . lets you write the 
document to a different file- 
name, thus preserving the cur- 
rent document and automat- 
ically replacing it with the new- 
ly created one. 



The topic whose value is 
will be displayed whenever 
help is requested in a context 
for which no help has been 
defined. 

Later topics will be given 
values that increment by 1 
each time, so Save will be 1 
and Save as . . . will be 2. 

Lines starting with a period 
are used to generate values 
for the help system, and com- 
mands embedded within the 
text are set off by curly brac- 
es to indicate hypertext links. 
The source file above would 
create this PAS file; 

unit edhelp; interface 
const hcNoContext = 0; hcSave 
= 1; hcSaveAs = 2; 
implementation 

end. 

It took the .topic links, insert- 
ed he in front of each, and 
wrapped up these constant 
values in public unit declara- 
tions. Add that file to your US- 
ES clause and mix well. 
TVHC is surely a no-frills pro- 
gram, but it makes online 
help a Cakewalk. 

After creating the help file, 
you need to add a couple of 
methods to your TApplication 
descendant, add a help com- 
nnand to the status line, and as- 
sign help constants to any 
menu or TView-descended ob- 
ject for which you need help, 
like this: HelpCtx := ticSaveAs:. 

HelpCtx is a field in all 
TView descendants: it pro- 
vides a hook for help systems 
like the one that comes with 
Turbo Vision. If you can't re- 
member which objects are de- 
scended from TView. the com- 
piler willingly reminds you: An 
Unknown identifier message 
when you try to write to 
HelpCtx means it isn't! 

Don't settle for less. Just 
download TVED.ZIP and fol- 
low these steps; you II end up 
with a help system rivaling 
that of any commercial prod- 
uct. All for free. n 



52 COMPUTE JULY T992 




'S LIVING PROOF THAT THE GODS HAVE A SENSE OF HUMOR 



Here's what the reviewers are saying: 

"Heimdall is constantly surprisins and so huge it is going to be some time before you 

have exhausted the posslbilitlesE" 

"A delightful combination of action and animation." 

"The graphkal content is never less than good and in many places it's stunning." 

Live the life of the viking warrior Heimdall in the ultimate quest adventure as you pit 
your bravm and brains against that evil dude Loke. Follov^ Heimdall through a series of 
misadventures on his action-packed crusade to save the world... and his reputation as 

one BAD Viking! circle Reader Service Number 183 



ran Limttc] 
VISA, MASTERCARD, 
AMERICAN EXPRESS AND 
CHECKS ACCEPTED. 
A VAIIABLE IN SPRING OF 931 
AMIOA SCREENSHOT5 SHOVft4. 
Hc^ddll is a tradcmortt ol Virsln Games, Inc. and Ccfc Design, Ltd. 01 992 VirsJn <3Vy«%, Ifk anO Core [>csl3n, Ltd. All rights leservtd. Virsin is a rejistercd trademvl^ of Vjrgln Entcipfiscs, Ltd. 




■^mm 


^ 




f5^ 


f?*^ 


— "^ffl 


jfe 


L 


ws'-^'i. 


^^K 


^04 


U^2.L» 



FEATUItES: 

% Choose from over 30 different characters with 

varying RPG attributes 

% Explore the mysterious realms of the 

Norseland as you solve puzzles guaranteed to 

keep you challenged for hours on end 

Top-down scrolling isometric viewpoint 

% Fluid animation and stunning graphics created 

by a team of world class animators 

FOR PRICING DEvaopED ay 

AND ORDERS, 
PLEASE CALL 
aM-VRG-lN07. 



am 




INTRODOS 



Tony Roberts 



Witti large 

hard drives, you 

need to pay 

spBGial attention to 

partitions 

and cluster size. 



ORGANIZING 
URGE DRIVES 

Having a big, fat hard drive is 
wonderful, but managing 
large amounts of storage pre- 
sents a new set of cliaKenges. 

For example, how should 
you set up your hard disk — 
one huge partition or two or 
more smaller ones? Let's lool< 
at the advantages and draw- 
bacl<s of each setup. 

The main advantage of as- 
signing the entire disf< to one 
farge partition is convenience. 
Navigation is a little easier 
with everything in one place, 
but you run some risks. 

Keeping huge amounts of 
data in one partition is like car- 
rying all your eggs in one bas- 
ket. If the FAT (File Allocation 
Table) for that partition gets 
scrambled, your entire data 
set could end up fried. 

By breaking up your disk in- 
to partitions, each with its own 
FAT, you have some protec- 
tion. If one FAT becomes dam- 
aged, your loss will be limited 
to the information in that 
partition. 

Another issue to consider is 
cluster size and wasted 
space. A cluster is the small- 
est unit of assignable disk 
space, and an unnecessarily 
large cluster size wastes 
some of that precious space. 

To check the cluster size of 
your disk, run CHKDSK. Near 
the bottom of the CHKDSK dis- 
play, you'll see a line saying X 
bytes in each allocation unit 
This tells you the cluster size. 
Every file is allocated disk 
space in clusters. 

If your disk is a floppy disk, 
that cluster will likely be 1024 
bytes. A 1-byte file would be 
allocated one cluster and occu- 
py 1024 bytes of disk space. 

Hard disks ranging in size 
from about 18MB to 120MB 
have cluster sizes of 2048K. 
Larger hard disks assign 
space in units of 4096K. So a 



1-byte file on a 100MB hard 
disk would occupy 2048 
bytes, and the same file on a 
200MB hard disk would occu- 
py 4096 bytes. 

Let's say you have a hard 
disk with a 4096-byte cluster. 
Assume the disk holds 2500 
flies. The data in each file fills 
some clusters and partially 
fills one — the last — cluster. 
Some of these last clusters 
will be nearly empty, some will 
be nearly full, and most will be 
somewhere in between. For 
the sake of discussion, let's 
say the last cluster of each file 
averages one-half cluster 
(2048 bytes) of unfilled 
space. 

Multiply the average un- 
filled space (2048 bytes) by 
the number of files (2500), You 
get 5,120,000 bytes of space 
that your files occupy but 
don't actually use. 

If you break your hard disk 
into smaller partitions which 
use 2048-byte clusters, you 
can recover half of that un- 
filled space. Assuming that 
the average last cluster is still 
half-full, you ve reduced your 
occupied but unused space 
to 2,560,000 bytes. 

If you keep thousands of 
files on your hard disk, a small- 
er cluster size can pay off by 
giving you extra room to work. 
On the other hand, if your disk 
is used to store only a few 
multimegabyte database files, 
larger partitions may be a bet- 
ter choice. Your database will 
have room to grow, and you 
won't be concerned about 
running out of real estate for 
your data. 

Breaking up a disk into par- 
titions also helps at backup 
time. Imagine backing up a 
200MB disk onto floppies, You 
can see that you'll want to be 
selective about what you back- 
up. Some data you'll want to 
back up daily some occasion- 
ally, some never. 

I have all of my work files on 
one partition, and I back up 



my changed files on that par- 
tition daily. I use a second par- 
tition for files I never want to 
back up, I use this for test files 
or shareware programs that 
I'm trying out. If I like the prod- 
uct and intend to use It and 
register it, I move it to my main 
partition. If not, I just delete it. 

My third partition Is used for 
telecommunications activity — 
files to upload or download as 
well as Incoming and outgoing 
messages. I back up this par- 
tition occasionally to make 
sure I can restore all of my pro- 
grams, scripts, and configura- 
tion files, but I'm not too con- 
cerned about the data on this 
partition. If the file is important, 
it gets either printed out or 
moved to my primary partition. 

Because I've arranged my 
disk this way, my daily back- 
ups are much faster and. less 
intrusive than they would be if 
I had to deal with the entire 
hard disk. 

Whether you have one 
huge partition or many small- 
er ones, you still have the 
same amount of data, and you 
must take pains to protect it. 
The larger your hard disk, the 
larger your loss if something 
goes wrong. 

At the very least, run 
CHKDSK on each of your 
hard disk partitions daily You 
can put the commands to do 
this in your AUTOEXEC.BAT 
file, and you'll learn early It 
anything is out of whack on 
your drive. At the first hint of a 
problem, take quick corrective 
action. 

If you have a more powerful 
disk-fix utility, use it rather 
than CHKDSK to make sure 
your storage areas are sound. 
Such utilities are more compre- 
hensive and easier to use 
than CHKDSK. 

If your hard disk isn't set up 
the way you'd like, stay tuned. 
Next month we'll look at the 
FDISK command and discuss 
how to use it to partition your 
computer's hard disk. H 



54 COMPUTE JULY 1992 



!*^'*«f«£rar?t*«* 



INTRODUCING 



connpuTE 



cannpuTE 






***************** 
******************* 
*** 

*** 
*** 
*** 
*** 

***************** 

COMPUTE RoundTable 



Welcome lo Compule/MET 

Hosied by Rick Leinecker 

wilh assistants 

Tom Campbell 

Stephen Levy 

Peer Plaut 



GEnfe 
1. COMPUTE Bulletin Board 

. COMPUTE Realtime Conference 

, COMPUTE Software Libraries 

, About the RoundTable 

. RoundTable News (910702) 

. About COMPUTE and the COMPUTE Editors 

. Feedback to the Sysops 
a. RoundTable and Library Help 
9. COMPUTE Products 

10. Coming Soon in COMPUTE 

11. COMPUTE Back Issue Database 

12. COMPUTE Test Lab 

13. Software Publishers' Catalogs 

14. COMPUTE Online Game 



COMPUTE/NET on GEnie had a tcriific 
grand opening. The comments ranged 
ftoni "IVe never seen a RoundTable open 
up with so much information" to "This 
makes my modem and computer sj'stem 
worth their price." 

This month we're sponsoring some 
contests. Do you know your computer 
trivia? Then try our computer trivia game. 
And that's only one of the games we have 
ready. There's a scavenger hunt and a logic 
game. And if you win, you can get fiec 
magazine subscriptions, disks, books, or 
connect time. 

Above all, though, when you visit 
COMPUTE/NET, stop in at the 
COMPUTE Bulletin Board and partidpate 
in some of the most stimulating 
conversations online. 



FIND US ON GENIE 



GEnie 

7bu Get So Mtidf Far So Little. 




Now enjoy unlimited non- 
prime time usage of over 100 
popular GEnie Service features. 
For just $4.95 a month.* You 
get everything from electronic 
mail to exciting games and 
bulletin boards. Nobody else 
gives you so much for so little. 

Plus enjoy access to software 
libraries, computer bulletin 
boards, multiplayer games and 
more for just $6,00 per non- 
prime hour for all baud rates up 
to 2400. And with GEnie 
there's no sign-up fee. 



♦Applies only in U.S. Mon.-Fri., 6PM-SAM local 
time and all day Sat., Sun., and select holidays. 
Prime time liourly rate SI 8 up Ui 2400 baud. Some 
features subject m surchar^^c and may not be 
available nuisidc U.S. Pricey and products IHlcd as 
of Oct. 1, 1990 subject to change. Tclccommunica- 
tiojis surcharges may apply. Guarantee limited ro 
one per customer and applies only to first month 
of use. 



Just Follow These Simple Steps. 

1. Set your communications software for half duplex (local 
echo), up to 2400 baud. 

2. Dial toll-free 1-800-638-8369. Upon connection, enter 
HHH. 

3. At the U#=prompt, enter XTX99411, COMPUTE. Then 
press Return. 

4. Have a major credit card or your checking account number 
ready, 

For more information in the U.S. or Canada, 
call 1-800-638-9636. 




6E Infomiatkm Servwes 



SIGN UP TODAY 



HARDWARE CLINIC 



Mark Minasi 



New modem 

protocols have 

made online 

communications a 

lot easier. 



HOW MODEMS 
WORK, PART 2 

Last month, we looked at hiow 
PCs transferred data over 
phone lines at the start of the 
computer revolution. 

Originally, a bulletin board 
system (BBS) would basically 
toss the data over the phone 
lines to the receiving comput- 
er, and the computer would 
capture the data as it came in , 
line noise and all. Line noise 
wasn't a problem then, as we 
were usually communicating 
at 300 bps, and phone lines 
look almost perfectly clean to 
300-bps modems. 

Then came faster modems, 
at 1200 bps and up, Pushing 
phone performance made for 
occasional errors — still no 
more than a bad bit every 
hour or two, but a measurable 
amount. 

XMODEM was the first at- 
tempt in the PC world to solve 
the problem of transporting da- 
ta over phone lines and ensur- 
ing that any errors in transmis- 
sion were caught and automat- 
ically corrected. 

XMODEM has been largely 
outclassed by newer transfer 
methods, but it retains a great 
strength — it's ubiquitous. You 
can find the old guy every- 
where. Every communications 
program supports XMODEM, 
at a minimum, 

Nonetheless, XMODEM has 
four deficiencies. First, its 
block size is too small and 
makes for inefficient transfers. 
(We'll see why this month.) Sec- 
ond, it requires the operator to 
tell both the receiver and the 
sender the name of the file. 
Third, it only transfers one file 
at a time. Fourth, its checksum- 
based error-detection scheme 
is too simple in the eyes of 
some people. These four weak- 
nesses led to the development 
of today's file-transfer methods 
or, as they're commonly 
called, protocols. 



Block Party 

For the rest of this column, I'll 
talk about that first character- 
istic, block size. It's the really 
big difference in the newer pro- 
tocols — the transfer block 
size. That's the big story— and 
the secret to increasing the 
speed of your file transfers by 
as much as 300 percent. 

Recall how XMODEM 
works. The sender sends the 
first 128 bytes of the file, then 
wails while the receiver deter- 
mines whether or not the 128- 
byte block has transferred with- 
out transmission errors, using 
a simple checksum. Once the 
receiver has acknowledged 
the receipt of the first block, 
the sender sends the next 
128 bytes, and so on. 

The key to understanding 
why this is really inefficient 
(for most applications) is 
in knowing that the process 
of the receiver's checking 
the checksum and sending 
the acknowledgment to 
the sender may take more 
time than is required to send 
the entire block in the first 
place. 

To see this, imagine this ex- 
aggerated scenario. You're 
communicating at 9600 bps 
with a BBS. This is 960 bytes 
per second, so each 
XMODEM 128-byte block 
takes about ,13 second. Sup- 
pose it took 1 second for each 
acknowledgment to be comput- 
ed and sent. That would mean 
that the sender would be 
spending .13 second sending, 
then 1 second waiting, then 
.13 second sending, then 1 sec- 
ond waiting, and so on. You 
would only be transmitting the 
file 11 percent of the time. 
While the average situation 
isn't that bad, it's close. For ex- 
ample, many communications 
programs save each block to 
disk as it's being received, so 
changing the block size from 
128 to 1024 would reduce the 
number of disk accesses by a 
factor of 8. 



Catching Some Z's 

Today's protocols allow for 
blocks ranging in size fronn 
128 bytes to 1024 bytes. 
YMODEM, ZMODEM, and the 
CompuServe Quick "B" proto- 
col are three popular exam- 
ples. Your communications 
software probably allows you 
to set your block size, but the 
interesting question is. What 
is it already set to? I use 
Crosstalk for Windows exten- 
sively, and I like it a lot, but I'd 
used it for about a month be- 
fore I realized that it set all pro- 
tocol block sizes to 128 bytes 
by default. To see just how im- 
portant block sizes are, I trans- 
ferred several large files from 
CompuServe using block siz- 
es of 128 and 1024. The 128- 
byte block size averaged a 
throughput of 362 bytes per 
second; the 1024-byte block 
averaged 987 bytes per sec- 
ond. A stunning difference 
that didn't cost me a cent — 
but it sure saves me money in 
CompuServe charges. 

Now, there's a caveat to un- 
derstand about setting your 
block sizes large. If you have a 
noisy line and your protocol dis- 
covers that a 128-byte block 
has been garbled, the sender 
need only resend 128 bytes. 
But when lines are noisy and 
you're using 1024-byte 
blocks, every block with even 
a single bad bit in it requires 
that you resend 1024 bytes. 
So the rule in picking block siz- 
es is this: The cleaner the line, 
the larger the block size. Ex- 
periment to find the best block 
size, and don't just accept the 
default block size. You'll prob- 
ably find that local calls are 
more noise-free than long-dis- 
tance calls — optical fiber lines 
notwithstanding. 

Calling a Timeout 

A related performance tip has 
to do with timing. After the 
sender has sent the block of 
data, it will wait a specified 
amount of time for the ACK 



56 COMPUTE JULY 1992 



COMPUTE'S 

BEST PC G A 

Don't miss these six dazzling, ready-to-mn games complete 
with a 16-page magazine jammed with instructions! 





i iiihz 
iiifl^*- 


"1 

•1 


■■■■1 




iilll 




■■ilfe^ 




_""^KSi!=y 



Laser Chess 

Award-winning, two-player strategy 

game patterned after ctiess — but 

with an exciting new twist. 



Power Poker 

Addictive strategy game with a new 

dimension. Fun for one player or a 

group. 







I 


j^^^g 


1 ' 


■ - 


y 


^r 


i ' 


MM 
M ' ' 
1 1 


1 ! 

r 1 


Wm 




[ Aifli^l 


% 



Block Out 

Colorful and delightful strategy 

game that everyone in the family 

will want to play. 




Bounty Hunter 

Catch the crook and collect the 

bounty! So much fun, you'll never 

know you're mastering U.S. 

geography. 



Wormburner 

Skill and arcade action combine to 
form an unbeatable challenge. 



Supplies Limited, So Order Early! 



QuikServe 

Fling those fries! ^ling those 

shakes! Bounce those burgers! A 

frenzied arcade-style game for the 

stout-hearted only. 



YES! 



I want to have the time of my lifel Send 
me COIVIPUTE's BEST PC GAMES disk. I'll pay just 
$5.95 for each 5y4-inch or $6.95 for each SVj-lnch 
disk plus $2.00 shipping and handling per disk. 

Please indicate how many disks of each format you'd like: 
5V4-inch disks at ^S^S&'S&ch $5.95 each 

3V2-inch disks at $1]J:9&:^ch $6.95 each 

Subtotal 

Sates tax (Residents of NC and NY, please add appro- 
priate sales tax for your area. Canadian orders, add 7% 
goods and services tax. ) 

. Stiipping and handling ($2.00 U.S. and Canada, $3.00 

surface mail, $5.00 airmail per disk. For delivery out- 
side the U.S. or Canada, add $10.00 for postage and 
handling.) 

Total enclosed 



Name 

Address , 



City 

State/Province 

ZIP/Postal Code 

ChecK or Money Order 

Credit Card No 

Signature 



. MasterCard VISA 

Exp. Date 



(Required) 

Daytime Telephone No 

Send your order to COMPUTE's BEST PC GAMES 
324 W. Wendover Ave., Ste. 200 
Greensboro, NC 27408 

All orders must be pard in U.S. furtds by check drawn on s U.S. bant cr by mortey order. MaslerCard 
Of VISA accepted lor orders over S20 Tfiis offer wtll only be filled el Ifie above arJdfess and is not 
made m conjunction with any other magazine or dish-subscripfion offer F^aso allow 4-6 v«eks for 
delivery Sorry, but teleb^one orders cannot be accepted Disks avaiable only for IBM PC and 
oyrrpatbles Olter goiM while supplies last 



HARDWARE CLINIC 



that means "I got the data 
OK; send me the next block" 
or the NAK that means "I 
didn't quite get that: please re- 
send it." But the receiver 
can't acl<nowledge what it 
didn't get, so in case there's 
been a line hit that obliterates 
an entire block, the sender 
will only wait a certain amount 
of time for the receiver's re- 
sponse. If it doesn't get it, the 
sender assumes that the data 
was lost, and resends. The 
question of how long it waits 
is where timing comes in. 

Crosstalk for Windows, for ex- 
ample, allows you to set pro- 
tocol timings to sloppy (wait a 
long time for acknowledg- 
ments), loose, normal, and 
tight. As before, a clean line 
can handle more strenuous tim- 
ing than a noisy line, so finding 
your best settings will require 
some experimentation. I found 
that the best throughput I 
could achieve with sloppy tim- 
ing was 894 bytes per second, 
but I got a throughput of 974 
with tight timing. In both cases, 
I was doing t024-byte block 
size transfers with a 9600-bps 
modem, That's 9 percent knock- 
ed off my CompuServe bill. 

My final suggestion this 
month for speeding up your 
file transfer has to do with er- 
ror-correcting modems. 
We've been talking about pro- 
tocols such as XMODEM, 
YMODEM, and ZMODEM that 
let the computers on either 
end of a conversation make 
sure that the data transfer is er- 
ror-free. Notice the word com- 
puters. There are programs 
running in your computer and 
the sender's computer that 
support the file-transfer proto- 
col. It takes two to tango, so 
you've got to have both sides 
supporting the same protocol, 
But some modem manufactur- 
ers have taken a different 
tack. They've built a file-trans- 
fer protocol into the modems 
themselves. To see why, let's 
look at a non-PC application 



of data communications. 

Once, I was doing some 
consulting for a doctor. I no- 
ticed that he had a printer 
and a modem sitting all by 
themselves off in the corner. I 
asked what the printer did. 

"That sends us the results 
of our lab tests," he replied. 
"We used to have to wait for re- 
sults in the mail, or we'd have 
to pester the lab on the 
phone. Now. the printer just 
comes to life a few times a 
day, and their computer uses 
our printer to deliver the lab 
test reports." 

Nifty, I thought. The lab 
sold him a normal Okidata dot- 
matrix printer with a serial in- 
terface and a modem — a reg- 
ular old PC-type smart mo- 
dem. But a problem occurred 
to me — what about line noise? 
I'd hate to get a report that 
said, "CANCER DIAGNOSIS; 
PA%SKD##i|," Looking close- 
ly at the modem, 1 noticed that 
it had a label that said, "MNP 
Level 5/Error Free." The testing 
company uses modems with 
built-in file-transfer protocols. 
Such modems use protocofs 
with small blocks, usually un- 
der 32 bytes in size. One way 
to tell if you're working with an 
error-correcting modem is to 
see if the text appears on your 
screen in spurts. The modems 
are examining the data in 
small groups, so, after acknowl- 
edging that the data is error- 
free, the data is released to 
the PC, which quickly puts it 
up on the screen. 

If you have an MNP mo- 
dem or one that supports 
V.42 or V.42 bis, you've got 
an error-correcting modem. 
/WWP stands for MIcrocom Net- 
working Protocol, and it's an er- 
ror-detecting and -correcting 
standard developed by Micro- 
com. \/A2 is the name of a mo- 
dem standard promulgated 
by the CCITT (Consultative 
Committee on International 
Telephones and Telegraphs, 
a committee of a commission 



of the United Nations). All the 
V. standards refer to -mo- 
dems. V.22 bis is the stan- 
dard that most 2400-bps mo- 
dems are built around, '\/.32 is 
a very popular 9600-bps stan- 
dard, and V.24 is the stan- 
dard that describes the serial 
ports on your PC, 

Paying the Overhead 

It seems that if the modems 
do the hard work of file trans- 
ferring, that can't be a bad 
thing. In fact, it's valuable in 
many cases, but the vast ma- 
jority of phone lines (in the 
U.S., anyway) are fairly clear. 
And, of course, there's a 
price lo pay — it takes time for 
the modems to do the error 
checking, and that's time that 
they're not transferring data. 
My experience is that the ex- 
tra overhead of the modem er- 
ror checking usually doesn't 
pay off. 

Think about disabling error 
checking (it's sometimes 
called ARQ) if your modem 
has this built in. You can gen- 
erally turn it off either with a 
DIP switch or by altering your 
modem's setup string to in- 
clude the three characters 
cS/WO. Again, my experimenta- 
tion showed a best-case trans- 
fer of 974 bytes per second 
when error checking was dis- 
abled versus 894 bytes per 
second when it was left on. 

What about when you do 
have noisy lines? Should you 
disable error checking and set 
your protocol block size small, 
or should you let the modems 
handle the error checking and 
use the maximum protocol 
block size? Definitely the latter, 
for two reasons. First, modem 
protocols have less overhead 
than most PC file-transfer pro- 
tocols. Second, my unscientific 
tests with noisy phone lines 
have shown that modem proto- 
cols recover from noise much 
better than PC file-transfer proto- 
cols do. Given the choice, let 
the modem do it. □ 



58 COMPUTE JULY 1992 



into their pop" ^*,^^erture, and 
-^"|^tSe«-^-e .message. 



When Rex Nebular arrives, they'll get all the 
excitement they can handle. 



ENTERTAIN men;' • SOflWAPE 

©1992 MicroProse Sonware, Inc. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. 

1-800-879-PLAY 

Circle Raad«r Service Number 212 



JULY 1992 COMPUTE 59 



SHAREPAK 



Bruce M. Bowden 



July's SharePak 

brings you 

a powerful selection 

of software. 



A FANTASTIC 
FOURSOME 

July's SharePak disk contains 
an interesting mix of three 
wide-ranging utilities and one 
highly original game. 
SeekEasy searches your files 
for approximate text strings us- 
ing a "fuzzy logic" technique. 
EZ-SHOW lets you capture 
graphic and text screens, and 
then create a slide show with 
them. Appointment Book will 
handle the appointment calen- 
dars for ten people simultane- 
ously. The arcade-style game 




Save fellow godmothers in 
F.Godmom. 




Fuzzy logic lool<s for files in 
SeekEasy. 

F.Godmom will keep you on 
the edge of your seat through 
50 levels. 

Shareware is software re- 
leased to bulletin board sys- 
tems and computer networks 
as an alternate way of market- 
ing. COMPUTE'S SharePak 
comes to you with programs 
which are among the best of 
the shareware we've seen, 
and we see a lot — hundreds 
of titles every month. The sav- 
ings to SharePak subscribers 
in time, energy, and online 
fees are significant. 



SeekEasy 

SeekEasy is a text-search util- 
ity with intelligence. With 
SeekEasy, you don't have to 
remember the exact wording 
or spelling of the text. The pro- 
gram will scan your disk files 
to find text that even approxi- 
mately matches what you 
asked for. For example, if a 
file somewhere on your disk 
holds the text "The trunk of 
the elephant is. . , ," 
SeekEasy can find it even if 
your request is for ephalant's 
trunq. The text it finds is dis- 
played in "best-matches- 
shown-first" order. 

SeekEasy can be set to 
search through one file, al! 
the files in a directory, those 
in a directory and all its sub- 
directories, or those within a 
whole drive's worth of files. It 
will scan all file types: word 
processor, database, even 
COM and EXE files. It can be 
told which filenames or file 
types to include or ignore. It 
shows you the items it finds 
during its search in the order 
of best matches first, as deter- 
mined by its "fuzzy logic" al- 
gorithms. As you can see, 
SeekEasy is a well-written 
and thoroughly fascinating utili- 
ty to use. 

SeekEasy works on any PC 
or compatible with DOS 2.0 
or higher and at least 256K of 
RAM. The program also runs 
under Windows 3.0- 

EZ-SHOW 1.0 

EZ-SHOW helps you create 
professional desktop presenta- 
tions, slide shows, and prod- 
uct demos without using 
scripts! The set of files con- 
tains a screen-capture pro- 
gram, a presentation-creation 
program, and a royalty-free 
show program. The capture 
program works with almost an- 
ything your screen can dis- 
play from text screens to Su- 
per VGA graphics. It's a TSR, 
sitting in about 9K of memory 
until you invoke it to do a 



screen capture with specially 
designated hot keys. The pres- 
entation creator lets you 
group your pictures for a 
slide show, using point-and- 
shoot menus, mouse support, 
and built-in help. The features 
include picture fades, individ- 
ual picture delays, user fiow 
control, branching, back- 
ground processing, EGA pal- 
ette editor, and much more. 

EZ-SHOW requires an IBM 
PC or compatible running 
DOS 2.1 Of higher with a 
CGA, EGA, MCGA, or VGA 
display. 

Appointment Book 1.0 

Appointment Book is a gener- 
al-purpose appointment mak- 
er that lets you keep track of 
appointm-ents for up to ten 
people. When you invoke the 
program, it gives you the cur- 
rent day's appointments. If 
more than one appointment 
at the same time has been 
made for a person, the soft- 
ware will highlight the times 
for which there is a conflict. 
You can search for open ap- 
pointment slots on any date 
or for any scheduled appoint- 
ments according to date or us- 
er parameters, 

Appointment Book works 
on any IBM PC or compatible 
with DOS 2.0 or higher, 

F.Godmom Version 2.1 

F.Godmom stands for fairy 
godmotfier. In this ar- 
cade-style game you play a 
fairy godmother on a mission 
to free 50 of your fellow fairy 
godmothers. Armed with a 
magic wand of transforma- 
tion, you must make your way 
across 50 levels while avoid- 
ing killer crabs and danger- 
ous dimensional implosions. If 
you succeed, your fellow fairy 
godmothers will be freed and 
will dance for joy in your hon- 
or. If not, it's curtains for you, 
F.Godmom was written for 
machines with CGA, EGA, or 
VGA monitors. D 



60 COMPUTE JULY 1992 



WitK COnnPUTE's SharePak, You'll 



SHARE IN THE SAVINGS! 



SAVE TIME 

We carefully select and test all programs for you 

SAVE MONEY 

Each disk includes two to five programs for one low price 

SAVE KEYSTROKES 

Our free DOS shell lets you bypass the DOS command line 



July's 

SharePak 

disk 

$1.49 

per program! 



Back Issues Available 

NOV 89: CheckMate, maintain muttlple checking and savings ac- 
counts: Contact Manager, keep track of ail your contacts. 
(#CDSK1189) 

FEB 90: Fastbuffer. speed up key-repeat rates: Flu Shot, ward 
off computer viruses; PC-KWIK. speed up your fiard disk access; 
CompuShow, view GIF pictures on your PC. #CDSK0290) 

APR 90: Pianoman, play and record music on your keyboard; 
Tune Trivia, test your music trivia; Morse Code Trainer, increase 
your Morse code proficiency; RealSound Sampler, create digit- 
ized sounds. (#CDSK0490) 

DEC 90: Audiotog. catalog your audio collections; WcfeoTesf, ad- 
just your monitor for maximum performance; Video Librarian, 
track your VCR tapes. (#CDSK1290) 

FEB 91 : Our United States, develop your knowledge of ttie U.S.; 
Trivia Whiz, great trivia game; Word W^\iz, great vocabulary drill/ 
garne; The World, enhance your world qeoqfapfiy. 
(#CDSK0291) 

MAY 91: Clicli! Filer, excellent program manager and file man- 
ager; PBIcon, make your own icons for Windows applications; 
PCBUDGET full-featured budgeting tool; Resume Professional, 
create tfie best possible resume. {#CDSK0591) 

JUL 91: SimplyWrite. exceptional ASCII text editor; PROspector, 
keep track of business prospects; Filesync, quickly update ttie 
right files. (#CDSK0791) 



COMPUTE'S SharePak disk contains the best 
of sfiareware— handpicked and tested by our staff— to 
complennent tfiis month's focus. You'll sample entertainment, 
learning, and home office software at a great savings. Each 
SharePak disk includes two to five programs plus complete 
documentation for one low price: 

$5.95 for 5%-inch disk § 

$6.95 for SYa-inch disk 

For even more savings. 
Subscribe to SharePak and receive 
COMPUTE'S SuperShell FREE! 

For a limited time, you can subscribe to COt^PUTE's 
SharePak and save more than 37% off the regular cost 
of the disks— plus get COMPUTE'S SuperShell FREE. 
With a one-year paid subscription, you'll get 

• A new 372- or S'A-inch disk delivered to your home 
every month 

• Savings of over 37% off the regular disk prices 

• Advance notices of COMPUTE special offers 

• COMPUTE'S SuperShell at no additional costi 

Subscribe for a year at the special rates of $59.95 for 
5y4-inch disks and $64.95 for 3'/2-inch disks — and get 
COMPUTE'S SuperShell FREE! 

COMPUTE'S SuperShell requires DOS 3.0 or higher. 

Disks available on!/ tor IBM PC and compatibles. Q^er good while supplies last. 



For Single Disks 

Please indicate how many disks of each format you would like: 

5'/4-inch at $5.95 S'/j-inch at $6.95 

This month's disk 

#CDSK1189 - 

#CDSK0290 

#CDSK0490 

#CDSK1290 

#CDSK0291 

#CDSK0591 

#CDSK0791 



Subtotal 

Sales Tax (Residents of NO and NY, please add appro- 
priate sales tax lor your area. Canadian orders, add 7% 
goods and services tax.) 

Shipping and Handling ($2.00 U.S. and Canada, $3.00 sur- 
face mail, $5.00 airmail per disk) 
Total Enclosed 



Subscriptions 

I want to save even more! Start my one-year subscription to COM- 
PUTE'S SharePak right away. With my paid subscription, I'll get a 
FREE copy of COIVlPUTE's SuperShell plus all the savings listed above. 

Please indicate the dish size desired: 

S'/.-inch at $59.95 per year 3'/:-inch at $64.95 per year 

For delivery outside the U.S. or Canada, add SlO.OO fw postage and handling. 



Name . 



Address . 



Ciiy. 



Stale/Province , 
Total Enclosed . 



ZIPyPostal Cotie_ 



Check or Money Order 



MasterCard 



Credit Caid No. 



Signature . 



Exp. Date . 



(Required) 

Daytime Telephone No. 

Send your order to COMPUTE'S SharePak, 324 West Wendover Avenue, 
Suite 200, Greensboro. North Carolina 27408. 

All orders must be paid in U.S. tunds by cfieck drawn on a U.S. bark or by rmoney order. 
(MasterCard or VISA accepted for orders over S20. This offer will be filled only at the above 
address and is not made in conjunction with any other magazine or disk subscription of- 
fer. Piease allow 4-6 weeks for dehvery of single issues or for subscription to begin. Sor- 
ry, but telepfvone orders cannot be accepted. 

Important Notice: COI^PUTE's SharePak is not associated with COMPUTE'S 
PC Disk. Please order SharePak separately. 



GET 

RIGHT, GET 

UGHT 



Any calendar will tell you Ihe 
eighties are over, but you'd 
never know it by looking 
around an airport. America's 
get-it-now business road 
show teems with mobile ex- 
ecutives squeezing every 
ounce of productivity they 
can from pay phones, sky 
pagers, cellular linkups, and 
public fax stations. 

Enter another weapon; 
the" portable computer. Small- 
er, faster, more powerful, 
and less expensive than ev- 
er, laptop and notebook com- 
puters have become terror 
weapons in the road warri- 
or's arsenal. 

But portable computers 
aren't just for business any- 
more. They make great sec- 
ond computers for the of- 
fice, for home, or for school. 
Or they can be used as mo- 
bile communications cen- 
ters. And while you might 
not believe it, the time is com- 
ing when a portable comput- 
er will replace that desktop 
computer you're using now, 

Portable computers are 
the fastest growing segment 
of the computer market and 
have garnered a loyal follow- 



ing among computer users 
of all stripes. These small 
and powerful systems have 
the potential for increasing 
productivity while at the 
same time granting flexibility 
in work schedules and envi- 
ronments. They can serve 
as a second computer in 
the office or at home, can 
travel as a communications 
tool, or even take over the 
functions of a desktop per- 
sonal computer. 

But for first-time buyers, 
the array of laptops and note- 
books can be intimidating. 
Balancing the expense 
against the gains is possible 
only when you can deter- 
mine your needs, and then 
match a system to those re- 
quirements and your person- 
al preferences. 

To make the right fit be- 
tween your power needs 
and the constraints of your 
budget, you must develop a 
strategy. This guide will 
help you determine where 
you stand in the field of port- 
able computing, tjse it to de- 
velop your personal strategy 
for buying the laptop or note- 
book system you need. 



For Under a Grand 

Here's the kind of machine 
you can expect to find for 
less than $1,000. 

System Profile: 

• 8QC86, V20, or 10-MHz 
80286 processor 

• CGA-compatible super- 
twist backlit LCD display 

• 1MB of RAM 

• Internal high-density 3'/?- 
inch floppy drive 

• 20MB hard drive 

Buyer Profiles: 

• Students 

• Writers 

• Occasional travelers 

• Anyone looking for a sec- 
ond home computer 

If you're ready for a sec- 
ond computer but the mon- 
ey around your house is 
tight, you can get a service- 
able laptop computer for un- 
der $1,000. You probably 
won't get VGA-compatible 
displays or 20-MHz process- 
ing speed, but you'll get 
enough of a machine for 
word processing, modest 
number crunching, and tele- 
communicating. If you're a 



ARTICLE - 
BY PETER SCISCO 

Computer 
hardware is getting smaller 

and changing faster. 

Here's a guide for keeping up 



student or if you have a stu- 
dent in your house, if you 
plan to do only word process- 
ing, or if you need a laptop 
only for occasional travel, 
then a portable computer in 
this price range should en- 
ter your consideration. 

You'll be able to find sever- 
al brand-name laptops in 
this category through mail- 
order outlets, including the 
Toshiba 1000XE, the Hyun- 
dai Super LT-3, and the 
Bondwell B310SX. The Toshi- 
ba is an XT-class system, 
the Hyundai offers AT-class 
performance, and the Bond- 
well actually contains a 
386SX chip. Each of the 
packages in this price 
range includes a hard 
drive, backlit LCD, and high- 
density floppy drive. At the 
time this feature was written, 
each package was adver- 
tised in the $1 ,000 range. 

Bundle any of these lap- 
tops — or comparable sys- 
tems — with the right soft- 
ware, and you have a very 
capable portable computer. 
Use an integrated software 
package such as Microsoft 
Works or Spinnaker's Eight- 



In-One for light number crunching, 
word processing, and contact manage- 
ment (with the built-in database mod- 
ules). If you want a more intuitive envi- 
ronment, you could use DeskMate or 
GeoWorks Ensemble. Integrated pack- 
ages usually offer file import/export ca- 
pabilities in standard formats such as 
ASCII, WK1, and dBASE. Tandy's Desk- 
Mate adds task switching (as does 
DOS 5.0); Ensemble provides multi- 
tasking within its own applications, 
even with an XT-class machine. 

Save the money you would have 
spent on a more powerful system to out- 
fit your inexpensive laptop with an exter- 
nal pocket modem. That will increase 
your productivity by linking you to infor- 
mation services and by providing a re- 
mote link to your desktop computer. 

For a Couple of G's 

This is what you can expect to find for 
between $1 ,000 and $2,000. 

System Profile: 

• 12-fVlHz 80286, 16- or 20-(V1Hz 386SX 
processor 

• VGA-compatible backlit LCD display 

• 1MB of RAM (minimum) 

• High-density 3y2-inch floppy drive 

• 20MB hard drive (minimum) 

• Internal or external modem 

• DOS 5.0 

Buyer Profiles: 

• Business students 

• Number-crunchers 

• Traveling salespeople 

• Telecommunicators 

• Marketing professionals 

If you find that your computing 
needs are more substantial than those 
described in our first category, you can 
spend a little more for a speedy AT- 
class (or better) laptop that will work 
nearly as well as your desktop comput- 
er. As prices continue to drop, the 
price differential between the 286- and 
the 386SX-based notebooks becomes 
less and less a factor. 

It's clear that if you need to run mod- 
erately powerful character-based appli- 
cations while on the road, you'll need 
the power and extra memory that a lap- 
top in this price range will give you. If 
your work is in marketing and account- 
ing, you'll appreciate the ability to run 
applications like Lotus 1-2-3 or 
Borland's Quattro Pro, Salespeople 
will want the extra speed and power to 
run contact-management software. 
And every professional who needs to 
communicate with corporate headquar- 
ters or with home will appreciate the 
telecommunications capabilities availa- 
ble in this price range. 

To find top-end machines at the low 

64 COMPUTE JULY 1992 




The midrange ZEOS notebook computer is 
both practical and popular. 




The Sharp PC-6781 offers monochrome 
graphics at $3,599. 



YOU CAN HEAR IT COMING 

Last fall at COMDEX, Media Vision— the 
maimer of trie Pro Audio Spectrum and 
Thunderboard sound cards — was talking 
about a txiard-level sound device lor lap- 
tops and portables tfiat would allow com- 
puter users to iake advantage of sound- 
enhanced applications wtiile on the 
road. 

This past January, the company an- 
nounced what it called Transportable 
Sound Technology for use in battery- 
powered sound peripherals designed for 
laptops. Media Vision uses a proprietary 
audio chip set that lakes up less space 
and has lower power requirements than 
other leading chip-set designs. 

A second peripheral manufacturer. Me- 
dia (without the Vision) showed what it 
called the Sound Commander T last fall 
at COMDEX. The portable sound device 
was designed to connect with a portable 
computer via a shared serial port. It's 
compatible with Sound Blaster and will 
run on a single nine-volt battery. 



end of this price range, you'll have to 
shop mail-order companies or direct 
sellers. The number of notebooks that 
promise the power of desktop comput- 
ers is mind-boggling. But among 
these, a few recognizable names 
stand out. ZEOS, for example, offers 
several notebook computers that fit our 
profile ranging in price from SI, 295 (12- 
MHz 286) to $1,795 (20-MHz 386SX). 
Recent advertisements list the NEC Ul- 
Iralite 286f at $999. 

Radio Shack has had the Tandy 
1800 HD sale priced at $1 ,299. This sys- 
tem matches the basic system profile 
for this group and comes with Desk- 
Mate and America Online software (an 
internal 2400-bps modem is optional at 
$199). The 1800 HD is housed in a 
smart-looking black case that resists 
dirt and scratches. 

Rjrther up the price and features lad- 
der, Wyse Technology recently cut the 
price of its DecisionMate Model 30 to 
$1,895. This 20-MHz 386SX system 
tips the scales at barely 4V2 pounds (in- 
cluding battery) and offers one of the 
most comfortable keyboards on the mar- 
ket (though the small function keys in 
a double row in the upper right corner 
take some getting used to). 

The DecisionMate exceeds our sys- 
tem profile with its 30MB hard drive, 
soft leather carrying case, copy of Trav- 
eling Software's Laplink (with cables), 
and Battery Watch. Optional equip- 
ment includes an extended-life battery 
(for up to 4^2 hours of battery power at 
an additional two pounds) and snap- 
in modules for tax/modem capabiiities, 
mouse input, and a second serial port 
(each module weighs between five 
and seven ounces). An external 
1.44MB floppy drive is included. 

Another 3B6SX 20-MHz notebook 
computer within this price range is the 
Acer Acros (available at several con- 
sumer electronics stores). This system 
boasts a fast hard drive and comes bun- 
died with MS-DOS 5.0, Windows, and 
Spinnaker's PFS WindowWorks. 

With the variety of systems available 
between $1 ,000 and $2,000, it's easy 
to find portables as powerful and func- 
tional as the typical desktop machine. 
You might not be able to put all of 
your applications on a 20MB hard 
drive, but you should be able to get 
your critical applications loaded. If 
your system gets crowded, you can al- 
ways use a compression program like 
Stac Electronics' Stacker to increase 
your hard disk space. 

Two Thousand to Infinity 

If you have plenty of money to spend, 
you can get plenty of computer. 
Here's the kind of highflier you can 
find if the sky's the limit. 



System Profile: 

• 20- or 25-MHz 386SX or 386SL proc- 
essor 

• VGA-compatible backlit LCD display 

• 2MB of RAM (minimum) 

• High-density 3y?-inch floppy drive 

• 40MB hard drive (minimum) 

• Internal or external modem 

• DOS 5.0 

Buyer Profiles: 

• Critical field personnel 

• Mobile executives 

• Windows users 

• Status seekers 

Once you get above the $2,000 
mark, there are few limits on what a port- 
able computer can do. Leading-edge 
engineering has put 80MB hard 
drives, 25-MHz processors, pa- 
per-white VGA displays, and graphical 
interfaces within reach of power-hun- 
gry professionals. In fact, with the 
right components, you could easily con- 
figure a portable computer to work as 
your only computer (adding an exter- 
nal monitor and keyboard for the of- 
fice). No longer would you have to trans- 
fer or copy files or log on to your desk- 
top machine from a remote site (at long- 
distance charges). All of your critical ap- 
plications and files would stay with you 
wherever you go. 

This kind of price range also brings 
into view Intel's top-of-the-line note- 
book processor, the 386SL, which is de- 
signed to extend battery life by using 
less power than its 386SX counterpart. 
Some notebook and laptop computer 
makers are using AMD's 386SXL proc- 
essor (and watch for additional Intel 
competition from other chip compa- 
nies), Either way a notebooi<; or laptop 
in this category can rightfully boast the 
speed and power to scream past 
many desktop systems. 

So what's the latest in this top cate- 
gory? If you work with sensitive data 
and you believe that James Bond mov- 
ies carry a cachet of adrena- 
line-charged excitement, the BCC 
SL007 from Beaver Computer is your 
machine. Its 2O-MH2 386SL chip rides 
herd on a 32K cache memory and 
works in tandem with a DES encryption 
processor (optional) to encode and de- 
code sensitive data on the fly. The 
SL007 ships standard with 4MB of 
RAM, a 62MB hard drive, VGA graph- 
ics, send/receive fax/modem, Win- 
dows, WinFAX, plus other features, all 
housed in a soft-touch black casing 
that resists scratches. Very cool stuff. 

If you're a power user who needs 
room to move, consider Advanced Log- 
ic Research's line of expandable port- 
ables, the ViP M series. Each VIP M 
notebook can move from a 20-MHz 



386SX workhorse to a 25-MHz 486DX 
screaming demon through a CPU-mod- 
ule upgrade. If you need something in 
between, a 20-MHz 486SX upgrade is 
also available. 

The advent of color laptops and note- 
books makes this upper echelon even 
more attractive. Sharp and Toshiba — 
to name but two companies — offer coi- 




The Bondwell B310SX offers 386SX 
performance for a low price. 



GUERRILLA CONNECTIONS 

Not every hotel will be kind enough to fur- 
nish your room with a data-capable 
phone — or even modular phone line 
jacks. If you find yourself in this situation, 
your first option is to call the front desk 
and ask that an RJ-11 jack be connect- 
ed to the existing teleptione line. Speak 
with authority and make it clear that 
you're a modern businessperson who re- 
quires the latest technology Many hotels 
are willing to do anything within reason to 
accommodate ttieir business customers, 

If the hotel management won't cooper- 
ate, cordially inform them that your com- 
pany won't use their facilities in the fu- 
ture. Then get to work setting up your 
own connection. Rather than ripping the 
phone lines from the wall {bad form. 
that — and it leaves you liable to pros- 
ecution), use a kit you can pick up at 
most electronic stores. Your kit should 
contain one RJ-11 module with four 
wires with attached clips, a set of clip 
leads, and wire snips. 

Cut off all of the leads from the RJ-11 
module but the red and green ones (you 
can do this ahead of lime). Now, if you 
take off the telephone receiver mouth- 
piece, you can remove the voice pickup 
just inside. (If the telephone doesn't 
have a removable mouthpiece, you're on 
your own.) Attach your clip leads (the 
ones connected to the green and red 
wires) to the prongs that are now visible. 
When you want to use your modem, 
take the telephone off the hook and dial 
through your computer 



or notebooks with fantastic displays 
that are even sharper than what you 
see on a desktop. These machines top 
out at about the price of a Saturn GSL 
automobile. Start saving now. Sharp's 
active matrix color PC-6881 should be 
available by the time you see this. 

What You Need 

Here are some items you should iook 
for in your portable computer package. 

• Flexible power-saving features for 
extending battery life. Such features 
might include an automatic "sleep 
mode" for disk drives and screen, 
the ability to switch to a slower proc- 
essing speed, the use of nonvolatile 
RAM for data storage, and the abil- 
ity to switch off unused I/O ports. 

• Software bundles that add value to 
your purchase, like MS-DOS 5.0, Win- 
dows, an integrated productivity pro- 
gram like Eight-In-One, or a file-trans- 
fer program like LapLink. 

• A sharp, fast display (VGA compati- 
ble if you can afford it) with sufficient 
backlighting and easy-to-work adjust- 
ment controls that will allow you to 
work in varied lighting conditions. 

• A hard drive that tests faster than a 
20-millisecond average access 
time. If you use a slower drive, you'll 
feel that you've sacrificed too much 
to get away from your desk. 

• A comfortable, well-spaced keyboard 
that fits your typing style and resists 
double-strikes. 

• Well-spaced I/O ports that will accept 
a printer, an external monitor, and a 
serial device simultaneously. 

Microsoft's Portable Initiative 

Last winter, Microsoft announced its 
Portable Computing Initiative, the first 
phase of which is Advanced Power 
Management (APM); a ROM version of 
MS-DOS 5.0; a data-transfer utility; and 
solid-state memory support. 

The APM specification was devel- 
oped jointly by Microsoft and Intel and 
is designed to extend the battery life of 
portable computers by up to 25 per- 
cent during full-on conditions. APM 
works by allowing the system BIOS 
and operating system to share critical 
power-management data while preserv- 
ing compatibility between the hard- 
ware and software during the power- 
conservation process. An APM driver 
for MS-DOS 5.0 has shipped, and a 
Windows 3.1 driver followed soon after 
APM is also compatible with non-APM 
applications, Though APM can be im- 
plemented on any of the i86-processor 
family, Intel built specific APM-support 
features into its 386SL chip. These fea- 
tures allow portable computer makers 
to implement APM functions and to 
keep APM overhead to a minimum. 

JULY 1992 COMPUTE 65 



The data-transfer utility, called In- 
terlnk, supports a transfer rate of up to 
36K per second via a parallel port. It al- 
so supports serial transfers. Microsoft's 
support of solid-state memory will help 
developers port their disk-based DOS 
applications to "smart cards" like 
Flash Memory and SRAM cards. 

Several portable computer makers, 
including Toshiba, Everex, Epson, Ze- 
nith, and NEC, support the Portable 
Computing Initiative. Portable comput- 
ers designed according to the new 
specifications should be available on 
the market in early 1993. 

So What's It Gonna Be? 

No matter what kind of computer user 
you are — hobbyist, white-collar w/orker, 
student, mobile executive, road warri- 
or, power user — there's a portable com- 
puter in your future. The latest laptops 
and notebooks compete with desktop 
systems in terms of power and speed 
and are far better machines in terms of 
desktop real estate and portability But 
don't write off older 8088-based, dual- 
floppy systems. You can get them 
used for a very good price, and even 
older portable systems with less proc- 
essing power still offer a flexible so- 
lution to the problems of a fluid informa- 
tion environment. And flexibility is the 
best power you can buy. D 



PICK ONE UP AND WALK AWAY 


For more information about the computer systems mentioned in this article or for informa- 


tion on other laptop, notebook, and portable computers, contact the companies listed 


below. 




ACER AMERICA 


SHARP ELECTRONICS 


2641 Orchard Pkwy. 


Sharp Plaza 


San Jose, CA 95134 


Mahwah, NJ 07430 


(800) 733-2237 


(201)529-8200 


ADVANCED LOGIC RESEARCH 


STANDARD COMPUTER 


9401 Jeronimo 


12803 Sctiabarum Ave. 


Irvine, CA 92718 


Inwindale, CA 91706 


(714) 581-6770 


(800)662-6111 


AST 


TANDY 


16215 Alton Pkwy. 


40O Tandy Center Atrium 


Irvine, CA 92713 


Fort Worth, TX 76102 


(714) 727-4141 


(617) 390-3011 


BCC 


TOSHIBA AMERICA 


(Beaver Computer) 


9740 Irvine Blvd. 


1 74 Component Dr. 


Irvine, CA 92718 


San Jose, CA 95131 


(800) 334-3445 


(408) 944-9000 






WYSE TECHNOLOGY 


BONDWELL INDUSTRIAL 


3471 N, First St, 


47485 Seabridge Dr. 


San Jose, CA 95134 


Fremont, CA 94538 


(408)473-1200 


(510) 490-4300 






ZEOS INTERNATIONAL 


HYUNDAI ELECTRONICS AMERICA 


530 Fifth Ave. NW 


1 66 Baypointe Pkwy. 


St. Paul, MN 55112 


San Jose, CA 95134 


(800) 423-5891 


(800) 727-6972 





COMPUTE Has the Official Guides to Sierra Adventures 





THEomaAI.BOOKOF 

KING'S 



QUEST 




QMIMi (Hid hlMt UM MTaMfM h* 

ktviOMf r-V m4 Ite litnt m M 
Cp-llOH* 



The Official Book of 

Leisure Suit Lany, 

Second Edition 

288 pages (2567) 

$14.95 



The Official Guide 

to Roger Wilco's 

Space Adventures 

272 pages (2370) 
$14.95 



The Official Book of 

King's Quest, 

Second Edition 

176 pages (2451) 

$12.95 



To order your copies send the appropriate amount plus $2 sfiipping and iiandling per book U.S. ($4 Canada and $6 other) to 
COMPUTE Books, c/o CCC, 2500 McClellan Ave., Pennsauken, NJ 08109. (Residents of NC, NY, and NJ please add appropriate 

sales tax; Canadian orders add 7% GST). 
All orders must t>e paid in U.S. funds drawn on a U.S. bank. Orders will be sfiipped via UPS Ground Service. Offer good wfrile supplies last. 

Comins in July ... The Official Book of Police Quest 



66 COMPUTE JULY 1992 



AD\/ENTURE INTO 
A Liy/ING UNIVERSE 



,#%*•*« 









n^mh 


IkIti 




^m 




r//i po/Nr Of 




0£S\G^i 





a JIN 




CH/^LL' 



£VAG£ 



GOMPUmS 




Help solve the Mystery of the vanished planet Earth. 



You and your comrades will follow a 
path of clues across the adventure- 
filled cosmos on a quest to return 
the Earth to its own space-time 
continuum. Buckle up, lay in your 
course and hang on. ..you've just 
crossed over the PLANET'S EDGE! 



Learn more about Planet's Etige... 

Available at your local retailer or direct from New World at 
1-800-325-8898 (U.S. and Canada) or at 1-818-999-0607, 

i! copyfight 1991 Planet's Edge Is a irademark of New World Computing. Inc. 

New World Computing Is a trademark of New World Computing, Inc. 

IBM screens shown, actual screens may vary, circle Reader Service Number 153 



New World at W^DI fl 

n 8-999-0607. n^pttLU 



dOMPume 

P.O. Box 4302. Hollywood. CA, 90078 



PRODUCTIVITY CHOICE 



This integrated package may be all 

ttie software you need to be productive In 

your home office or small business. 

Peter Scisco 



MICROSOFT 
WORKS FOR 
WINDOWS 

You might never get your 
hands on a free lunch, but 
your business can still feast 
on Microsoft Works. Of all the 
integrated software packages 
available for IBM and compat- 
ible computers, Works is supe- 
rior in its blend of critical 
home office and small busi- 
ness applications. Easy to 
learn, it boasts a consistent 
interface and is affordable. 
The word processor, data- 
base, spreadsheet, and tele- 
communications modules of- 
fer solid if not breathtaking 
performance. If you're run- 
ning a home office or a small 
business. Works might be the 
only software you need. 

Several subtle changes 
make the Windows version of 
Works different from the DOS 
version. For example, there's 
no telecommunications mod- 
ule because you can use Win- 
dows' Terminal. This illustrates 
the major advantage of the Win- 
dows version: instant access 
to the Windows accessories. 

Differences are immediate- 
ly apparent when you launch 
Works from the Program Man- 
ager The opening screen of- 
fers a selection of five but- 
tons: Word Processor, Spread- 
sheet, Database, WorksWiz- 
ards, and Open Existing File. 
A single click on one of these 
buttons propels you to almost 
instant productivity. 

Each application module 
shares common functions with 
the others. For example, no mat- 
ter which of the applications 
you're using, you can always 
open an existing file, regard- 
less of the native format. If 
you're writing a letter, you 




can open 

a spreadsheet. If your spread- 
sheet and word processor are 
open, you can open a data- 
base. Each module is fully op- 
erational within its application 
and within its own window. Win- 
dows can be cascaded or 
tiled for easy task switching 
and viewing, and cutting and 
pasting between the applica- 
tions is a snap. 

Veteran Works users who've 
recently moved to Windows 
will be surprised to find that 
the DOS command structure 
works side by side with the 
Windows commands. For exam- 
ple, you can cut a block of 
text using keyboard com- 
mands from Windows (Shift- 
Delete) or DOS (Ctrl-X). This 
may confuse some Windows 
users, as the Edit menu lists on- 
ly the DOS commands. 

Each application has a row 
of icons across the top of its 
window, a familiar sight to vet- 
eran Windows users. These 
buttons put the most common 
editing tasks right at your fin- 
gertips and are easily related 
to the functions they perform. 
Generally, the icon buttons 
from the upper left to the cen- 
ter of the screen govern com- 
mon functions such as font 
selection, type size, typefac- 
es, and alignment. A group of 
buttons to the right of center 
features functions specific to 



each application. 
In the database, for example, 
this group switches between 
list and form view, launches a 
query, and creates a report. 

This general overview of 
Works hints at the program's 
greatest strength — its interac- 
tive sharing of information 
and data between applica- 
tions. This sort of sharing is 
general to all well-designed 
Windows applications, but 
not all software developers ex- 
ploit the benefits of DDE and 
DLL. In Works, however, the 
solid interactive design 
doesn't come at the expense 
of any particular application. 

The Works word processor 
is much more robust than Win- 
dows Write. It will import Write 
files and documents produced 
in WordPerfect (5.0 and 5.1) 
and Word for Windows (1.x) as 
well as those saved in ASCII, 
RTF, or dBASE formats. This 
translation capability makes it 
well suited for use as an extend- 
ed-office application. When 
you take work home, you won't 
have to spend hundreds of dol- 
lars buying the high-powered 
applications you use at the of- 



68 COMPUTE JULY 1992 



fice; just save your files to disk 
in the right format and import 
them into Worl<s for editing. 

You won't confuse Worl<s' 
word processor with high-end 
programs lil<e Ami Pro, but 
any small business worker 
will be able to create smart- 
looking documents right 
away. Want to include a 
sketch? Open up the integrat- 
ed Draw program, create a 
picture, and place it in your 
document. Want to create a 
form letter? Select the data- 
base fields you want from any 
available Works database 
file, create objects in any of 
the other applications, and 
then paste them into your doc- 
ument. Commands and tasks 
are especially intuitive. 

The word processor also 
has a Note-It function that you 
can use to place a prede- 
signed icon in your text, accom- 
panied by captions. Place the 
icon and the associated text 
note in your document. Then, 
when you doubie-click on the 
icon, the note is displayed. 
Unfortunately Note-It is severe- 
ly underdocumented and is 
available only in the word proc- 
essor. You can append a note 
to a spreadsheet or database 
file, however, by bringing 
those files into the word proc- 
essor and then appending a 
note near the placed object. 

Weaker than the word proc- 
essor, Works' spreadsheet is 
good enough for most small 
business tasks and for home 
budgeting. As in Excel, an "in- 
stant sum" key allows you to 
add columns or rows of num- 
bers quickly without having to 
enter a formula. If the range 
of cells you want isn't select- 
ed, you can modify the selec- 
tion with your mouse. 

You can use buttons for set- 
ting cell-number attributes 
such as currency, percent- 



age, or general. Chart making 
is also easy. 

Microsoft has succeeded 
in keeping the Works spread- 
sheet from stealing away po- 
tential Excel customers. But 
the company omits functions 
that would've made this a 
stronger home office applica- 
tion. For example, the spread- 
sheet won't import Excel files 
directly. You have to save 
your Excel worksheet as a 
WKS file or as a Lotus-compat- 
ible WK1 file and then open it 
as a spreadsheet in Works. 

The spreadsheet is also 
light on text formatting. If, for 
instance, you try to change 
the point size of the text with- 
in a cell, the change is made 
to the entire spreadsheet. 
Again, you can paste the work- 
sheet into the word processor 
to make these changes. 

Works' free-form, flat-file da- 
tabase is Its strongest element. 
The database plays host to 
WorksWizards, predesigned in- 
teractive "macrotemplates" 
that guide users through vari- 
ous database functions and re- 
ports, such as creating mailing 
labels, address books, and 
form letters. In this version of 
Works, the Wizards are linked 
closely to the database func- 
tions. Wizards are different 
from standard templates (also 
provided) in that they prompt 
you for information and then cre- 
ate the document that match- 
es your input — the program 
compiles the forms and im- 
ports the necessary data. 

If you have a computerized 
contact list (an address book, 
for example) at work, you can 
export it as a text file and then 
import it into the Works data- 
base. Works will also directly im- 
port and export dBASE lil and 
IV files, retaining field names 
dunng translation. 

Anyone using Works as a 




small business application 
will be able to produce re- 
ports for inventory accounts 
receivable, and sales track- 
ing. Works' database reports 
can also be copied to the oth- 
er modules; database fields 
are separated by tabs when 
you send them to the word 
processor and by rows and 
columns in the spreadsheet. 
This kind of ease and au- 
tomation prompts Microsoft to 
put the slogan "Software for 
people" on the Works for Win- 
dows box. Along with many 
other companies, Microsoft re- 
alizes that exploiting the pow- 
er of the PC means making 
that power readily accessible. 
Combine Works with Win- 
dows, and you have just 
about all of the productivity 
software you'll ever need. D 

circle Reader Service Number 303 



IBM PC and 
compatibles 
I80286 or taster); 
640K RAM, 256K 
contigured as 
extended memory 
(1MB recommended); 
EGA, VGA, 851 4/A, 
or Hercules; one 
floppy drive and 
one tiard drive; 
Microsoft or 
compatible 
mouse— SI 99; 
multimedia PC 
version— $199 

MICftOSOn 
One Microsoft Way 
Redmond, WA 
98052-6399 
1800) 426-9400 



JULY 1992 COMPUTE 69 




!f you're like many technophiles, your house is wired for 
sound, with a stereo in the living room feeding speakers in 
rooms far away. Your television down in the den is connect- 
ed to cable, a VCR, and another set of speakers to crank 
out "The Simpsons," "Dinosaurs," and "Northern Exposure" 
in stereo. Your house is threaded with phone lines; you 
have extensions in every room., a second line for the kids, 
and maybe a third in your home office. Your fax machine is 
linked to your phone, phone to modem, modem to PC. 

But your computers, crucial to your lifestyle and home of- 
fice, suffer in isolation. They're islands, entire of themselves, 
with no way to connect other than low-tech sneakernet, 
where you wear out shoe leather shuffling disks from one ma- 
chine to another. 

A computer network for the home office can serve the 
same purpose as one in the corporate office: It links PCs for 
easy file transfer and communication, and makes it possi- 
ble to share a printer among several systems. Your home 
computer network can save you time — and money, too — 
just as a downtown business's computer connections 
make it a more productive workplace. 

And though the word network may conjure up images of 
cables snaking underfoot, it can be no more difficult to cre- 
ate, install, and run a home office net than it is to connect 
a printer, plug in a cable, or dial the phone. 

Full Service or a ia Carte? 

Office-bound networks serve four basic functions. 

• Sharing files between or among computers 

• Printing to a central printer from any machine 

• Running applications from a central system 

• Passing along electronic mail 

The first three make sense in a home network, but the 
last. E-mail, may seem ridiculous unless your office is 
spread throughout a very large house. But E-mail makes 
sense if there are more than two employees in your office, 
whether it's located in a house or an office building. It allows 
for paperless memos, messages for coworkers who are 
away temporarily, and an alternate route for the friendly give- 
and-take that makes an office cohesive and fun. 

Depending on how much money and effort you want to 

70 COMPUTE JULY 1992 



put into your home computer network, you can go for full serv- 
ice — file sharing, printer sharing, and software pooling — or 
simply share files and perhaps a peripheral or two. 

LAN software and hardware packages are popping up eve- 
rywhere — from computer store shelves to back pages of com- 
puter magazines. There are also numerous non-LAN prod- 
ucts that can perform basic LAN tasks like file transfer. File- 
transfer utility programs like LapLink Pro and modem-orient- 
ed products like ProComm can handle the simplest needs. 

From this modest beginning, you can work your way 
from a two-node, "peer-to-peer" (which means that no one 
computer is dedicated to operating the network) LAN all the 
way to full-scale multinode networks traversing thousands of 
miles. To find the right LAN for you, first evaluate the equip- 
ment you want to tie together. Where is that equipment locat- 
ed? What do you want to do with it? And how much equip- 
ment will you add to it later? 

fvlost smali LANs operate on the Ethernet standard. The 
Ethernet standard is analogous to the Hayes standard 
used for modems. Other standards include ARCnet and 
IBfvl's'Token Ring. A good LAN works in the background un- 
noticed by the computer user. Typical LANs require each 
node — each individual computer system tied into the net- 
work—to have an Ethernet-compatible or other standard net- 
work adapter card. 

f\/lost LAN starter kits come with two Ethernet-compatible 
cards, thereby providing a simple two-node LAN. Peripheral 
equipment (printers, modems, plotters, scanners, CD-ROf\/l 
drives, fax boards, and so forth) generally don't require indi- 
vidual nodes but are linked through a computer on the LAN 
instead. Most LANs can share printers and CD-ROfvl 
drives, fvlodems, plotters, and/or scanners are handled by 
only a few. 

At a minimum, the average LAN offers file transfer, periph- 
eral and software applications sharing, and electronic mail, 
fvlost include security features. 

There are two basic LAN configurations: peer-to-peer and 
client-sen/er. In a peer-to-peer network any machine can ac- 
cess applications and files on any other machine on the net- 
work. A ctient-server network is a hierarchical structure in 
which a client machine accesses another machine called a 



ARTICiE BY GREGG KEIZER 

Save time and energy. 

Let your computers swap files, share 

applications, talk to each other. 



server. The client uses applications from and stores files on 
the server's hard disk. A client is also sometimes called a 
redirector or a workstation. Some LANs (PromiseLAN in 
particular) can have peer-to-peer units, client units, and a 
server unit on the same network. The best LANs for person- 
al productivity are peer-to-peer, unless you have a spare 
386 lying around that you can use as the network server. 

When you're shopping for a LAN, variables to compare 
include maximum number of nodes, total RAM required, 
unique features, system requirements, additional purchases 
required, and price. See the accompanying grid ("LAN Al- 
ternatives") for information on low-cost LANs. 

Number of the Network 

The simplest and least expensive network is one that 
simply moves files from one computer to another via exist- 
ing phone lines. 

One file-transfer network takes advantage of your local 
phone company and LapLink Pro, a state-of-the-art file- 
transfer package for the PC. It may not be a network per se, 
but in a two-computer, two-phone line household, the com- 
bination gets you the same results. 

LapLink Pro makes it easy to transfer files over a serial ca- 
ble, but Traveling Software, the manufacturer, also sells con- 
nectors that allow you to string simple four-connector 
phone line between serial ports. A company spokesman 
said that he had successfully sent messages over 150 feet 
of serial cable, but if you are using unshielded phone line 
or live in an area with lots of radio emissions (from comput- 
ers, CBs, and even garage door openers), you will need to 
keep the distances shorter than this or risk data corruption. 

LapLink Pro's batch file transfer, dear progress gauges, 
and split screen — familiar to users of the earlier laptop-to- 
desktop LapLink software — make it a snap to use. Of 
course, with the program running, the source PC can't be 
used for anything else, but if your network needs are limited 
to moving files, it's a workable, bargain-basement remedy. 

Mixing Metaphors 

If you're connecting Macintoshes and PCs at home, you're 
only able to share files and printers. Since Macintoshes and 







■ 


1 


^^^^^^^^^^^^M 


r^ 


1 


^ 






l^ 




</m 






^■1 






.^^^^^^Km.. 


■^ 




-— - -' 



JULY 1992 COMPUTE 71 



PCs use different microprocessors and 
different operating systems, you can't 
run Mac applications on tine PC. 

Apple's own LocalTalk network, 
with capabilities built into tfie most re- 
cent Macintosh: operating system soft- 
ware. System 7.0, lets you link to PCs. 
Like the LapLink Pro connection, the 
simplest Mac-to-DOS LocalTalk net- 
work relies on the standard telephone 
lines in your house or office. 

You'll need a PhoneNet Card PC 
from Farallon for your PC, one of the 
company's PhoneNet connectors for 
the Macintosh, and a phone outlet 
near each computer. Farallon's Phone- 
Net is completely compatible with Ap- 
ple's own LocalTalk, but it sends the 
bits and bytes across the two unused 
wires found in most home phone lines 
(if your phone line doesn't have them, 
you can install separate phone wire 
and jacks yourself or have a phone- 
company installer do it). By relying on 
existing cabling, PhoneNet can save 
you a considerable amount of money, 
particularly if your computers are at 
some distance from one another. 

The PhoneNet Card PC only works 
with PCs that operate at 25 MHz or slow- 
er, but for those computers, it's a terri- 
fic way to share files with Macs or to 
use a laser printer with two different sys- 
tems. In effect, the PhoneNet Card PC 
and its accompanying software turn 
the PC into just another workstation on 
the LocalTalk network. You can share 
files and transfer them from Mac to PC, 
PC to PC, or PC to Mac, as well as 
print to a PostScript printer connected 
to the net. 

If your PCs are using DOS 5.0, you 
can move all but 2K of the 134K re- 



WHY NETWORK? 

The hardest part about installing a 
home computer network might be con- 
vincing yourself (or your family) that it 
makes sense. It does in many situations, 
and here's what you can do if you invest 
your system-improvement dollars in a 
net; 

• Store everything on a 386 or 486 
equipped with a large hard drive; then 
run applications and call files over (he net- 
work to cut costs and centralize backup. 

• Make any employees of your home- 
based business as productive as you 
are on the PC, 

• Justify more easily the cost of a print- 
er, since it can be used with several 
computers. 

• Mix Macs and PCs in the same 
house, and still keep them talking. 

• Let your kids run programs from 
their own PCs — games, educational ti- 
tles, applications for homework— without 
worrying about keeping track of disks. 



quired for the PhoneNet memory-resi- 
dent software into high memory, out of 
the v/ay of your applications. 

Of all the true network alternatives, 
PhoneNet is the quickest way to get 
your Macintoshes and PCs talking. 

Dollar Net 

You might think full-fledged networks 
are prohibitively expensive. If your im- 
age is of tens of computers, yards of ca- 
ble, and pricey network software, then 
you're probably right. In a home office, 
though, you can get by inexpensively, 
even if you need a full-blown network 
that's capable of moving files, sharing 
printers, and running applications 
from a central system. 



MOSES Computers' PromiseLAN is 
a good example. For $199 (about a 
third less if you buy it by mail), you get 
a starter kit that links two PCs in a full- 
service network. Included in the kit are 
the necessary network adapters, soft- 
ware, and telephone cabling. 

PromiseLAN is a real network, in 
that you can transfer files between com- 
puters and fun applications from one 
PC's hard drive on another machine. 
You do get what you pay for, though. 
PromiseLAN can only connect as 
many as five computers, and it trans- 
mits data at a slow 1,79 megabits per 
second (Mbps), while most office net- 
works move data at the Ethernet stan- 
dard of 10 Mbps. But in many home of- 
fices, where convenience and low cost 
are as important as a long features 
list, neither limitation matters. 

Do you want to stretch your cash 
even farther? Then The $25 Network 
may be just the thing. This software 
and cable package really costs only 
$25, and it connects as many as five 
systems with phone wire jacked into a 
serial port in each machine. Transmis- 
sion speed is even slower than Promise- 
LAN's — only 115 kilobits per second 
(Kbps) — but certainly acceptable for 
printing and file copying (a 150K file 
moves from PC to PC in just over ten 
seconds, for instance). The $25 Net- 
work lets you run programs on any of 
the networked PCs, but unless the pro- 
grams are fairly small, the data-transfer 
speed makes this impractical. 

Much faster and more complete in 
its features than either PromiseLAN or 
The $25 Network, LANtastic is a net- 
work that's inexpensive enough for the 
home office. Buy the LANtastic AE-2 



Although setting up a home network might 
be an enjoyable project, particularly for 
someone who enjoys setting up stereos 
and stringing cable, there are many other 
practical ways to coordinate the use of a 
small number of personal computers, 
most of which are less expensive than in- 
stalling a network. 

• Newer fvlacintoshes can read and 
write 3V2-inch PC disks, so you can run a 
small office with Macs and PCs on sneak- 
ernet: Simply shuttle files back and forth on 
floppies, using the Mac as the translator. 
(Older Macs can be upgraded to read and 
write PC disks.) 

• Removable hard disks allow you to use 
sneakernet with huge files and whole 
suites of applications. If you don't want to 
spend that much, tape drives are becom- 
ing remarkably inexpensive and are very 
compact, allowing you to move multimeg- 
abytes from machine to machine for 
around $250 plus the $30 cost of a tape car- 
tridge. The downside of networking with 



WHY NOT? 

sneakertape is that tape devices have a rel- 
atively slow data-transfer rate. They were de- 
signed for backing up document files, not 
moving applications around. Bernoulli 
drives would be another portable mass- 
storage option. 

• Many programs have severe restric- 
tions on network use. A true network won't 
let more than one machine have read- 
write access to a given document at one 
time (because one user could save the file 
and then another could save a different ver- 
sion of the same file, destroying the work 
of the first person). But many applications 
also have restrictions on their use when in- 
stalled on a network. Check your applica- 
tion manual under the section on network 
use. More than likely, it will tell you that on- 
ly one person can use the application at a 
time. You'll often find that software can't be 
used on a network unless you purchase a 
special version or a special utility that 
makes it network compatible. This kind of 
software often makes a statement in the us- 



er's agreement that using it on a network 
without a site license is illegal — and site li- 
censes can be very expensive. 

• Because of the costs involved, a full- 
featured network doesn't begin to pay tor 
itself in dollars or in convenience unless 
you have four or five nodes operating. The 
lesson hiere is that starting a two- or three- 
node network using most network options 
makes sense if you have plans to expand 
in the near future, but it would be prohibi- 
tively expensive if that's as far as you in- 
tend to go 

• For printer sharing, a simple A/B 
switch box will serve as well as a network 
and cost far less. Even sneakernet works 
pretty well for printer sharing. For print 
jobs that will generate printer tiles smaller 
than the capacity of a floppy disk, I direct 
the printer output to disk, transfer the disk 
to ttie computer connected to the printer, 
and use the command COPY A;PRINTFIL 
PRN to send the file to the printer 

—ROBERT BIXBY 



72 COMPUTE JULY 1992 



Ethernet Starter Kit for $699 (less by 
mail), and you get two AE-2 Ethernet 
adapter cards, a 25-foot length of co- 
axial cable, and the software to con- 
nect as many as 300 workstations. 

Expandability is less important than 
the fact that the network runs at a full 
10 Mbps, you get built-in electronic 
mail (in case you have an assistant), 
and you have access to all disk and 
printer resources on the network. This 
is called a peer-to-peer network — all 
the networked PCs act simultaneously 
as both servers and workstations. 

The result is a lightning-fast network 
that can take advantage of a iarge 
hard disk on one system and a laser 
printer connected to another. 

Through the Ether 

But what if you don't want to drill holes 
through walls or floors, or even go to 
the trouble of laying cable? Though it 
may seem like science fiction, you can 
connect computers in the home office 
with a wireless network that sends its 
signals via radio waves. 

The 1_AWN (Local Area Wireless Net- 
work) boxes from O'Neill Communica- 
tions cost $398 each (the printer node 
needs a special adapter, so it costs 
$489); connect to the serial port of 
each PC and printer on the network; 
and though not extraordinarily fast 



{19.2 Kbps), offer file transfer, E-mail, 
and printer sharing. 

If you have computers scattered 
around the house, LAWN dramatically 
cuts the network-setup time. It easily 
transmits data through walls, even 
floors, it's rated as an FCC Class B de- 
vice, which means that it won't interfere 
with other computers, televisions, or 
high-fidelity equipment in the house. 

LAWN is expensive to install — a two- 
computer-one-printer network runs near- 
ly $1,300— but if you'd rather compute 
than lay cable, it's an excellent alterna- 
tive for a 1990s home office. 

Tomorrow's Home Offke Today 

You may think that a home office net- 
work is a frivolous expense when 
you've got a business to run and mon- 
ey to make. But put a network pur- 
chase into the same context as any oth- 
er office upgrade, like a hard disk or a 
CD-ROM drive, and you may discover 
that the money (and perhaps time) 
spent will be worthwhile. 

If you work by yourself in a one-com- 
puter office, a network is obviously un- 
necessary. But if your home sports 
more than one computer (whether 
they are used for business or not), a net- 
work can pay for itself. 

Home-based businesses with more 
than one PC and more than one work- 



er benefit most from a network. If you 
hire help, even for such clerical con- 
cerns as correspondence or filing, link 
another PC to your primary machine, 
and you can improve your employees* 
productivity and your own. In fact, the 
more computers and workers you 
have to coordinate, the greater your net- 
work payoff will be. Therefore, any 
small business with five or more employ- 
ees, all using computers, should seri- 
ously consider the network alternative. 

Next in line is the single-system of- 
fice that shares the house with anoth- 
er PC, perhaps one used by your 
spouse or children. With a peer-to- 
peer network like PromiseLAN, it's eas- 
ier to justify the cost of a large hard 
drive or a laser printer because the 
end cost is distributed over several us- 
ers and machines. Your kids can keep 
their applications and files on your 
PC's drive, even use your laser printer, 
if you have a network. 

A home computer network may 
sound like an exotic beast, but it can 
be an inexpensive way to multiply the 
capabilities of all the machines — and 
computer users — under your roof. 



COMPUTE intern Autumn Miller contrib- 
uted to this article and created the 
chart on the following pages. O 




JULY 1992 COt^PUTE 73 





LAN 


Comment 


Capacity 


Distance 




LANtastic 

Artisofi 

691 E, River Rd. 

Tucson. AZ 85704 

(800) 846-9726 

(602) 293-6363 


LANtastic is one of the most full-tealured LANs available tot 
a small-lo-medium operalkjn. Fast data transmission; quick 
data access with resource caching and random access cach- 
ing; and a mullitude of printing, security, and syslem- 
management features loo numerous to mention put iJANIas- 
tic at the top ol the list. 


2-30O nodes 


t)etermined by cabling 




PhoneNET Card PC/LocalTalk 
Farallon Computing 
2000 Powell St., Ste, 600 
Emeryville. CA 94608 
(510) 596-yOOO 


The new Macintosh computers come with built-in network 
capability, PhoneNET lies a PC into an established Mac Lo- 
calTalk network, permitting PCs lo access and share Apple/ 
Mac printers and files. Wilt work wilh Windows. 


With AppleTalk Phase 2. 
address support for up to 
16 million nodes 


Up to 4500 feet 




Ttie S25 Network 
Information Modes 
PO. Drawer F 
Denton. TX 76202 
(800) 628-7992 
(817) 898-1294 


The $25 Network ties computers togettier by connecting stan- 
dard iBlephone wire to standard serial ports. No adapter 
cards are necessary. Its abilities are iimited (rro file locking), 
but the price is a grabber. 


2-5 nodes 


Up to 160 feet 




MAXUM^ 

MAXLAN 

11083 Wilkinson Ave. 

Cupertino, CA 95014 

(800) 234-1688 

(408) 739-2581 


WlfiXlMi supports sharing fax, disk drives, primers, files, 
and applications and will soon have E-mail. While it can be 
used as a peer-to-peer network, the developers state that 
network performance increases by dedicating one computer 
as the server. Will work with Windows. 


2-64 nodes 


Up to 1670 feet 




Promise LAN 

MOSES Computers 

15466 Los Gatos Blvd.. Ste, 201 

Los Gatos. CA 95032 

(408) 358-1550 


Wliite PromiseLAN is slower than some previously mentioned 
LANs, it offers many full-scale features, such as print spool- 
ing and file and record locking. PromiseLAN adjusts trans- 
mission speeds lo accommodale slower XTs wilhoul al- 
tecling the other computers tied into the network, MOSES 
Computers also sells the more powerful ChosenLAN. for up 
to 53 nodes, and SwiftLAN, which connects notebook com- 
puters through an external adapter card attactied to the par- 
allel porl. The PromiseLAN software isn't available without 
the MOSES Computer adapter cards, since MOSES's propri- 
etary standard makes the software incompalibia with other 
cards. Will work wilh Windows with no special installation. 


2-8 nodes 


Up lo 500 feel between machines 




NetWare Lite (software) 

hJovell 

122 E 1700 S 

Provo. UT 84606 

(800) 526-5463 


Novell has adapted its full-scale NetWare sen/er-based soft- 
ware into a peer-to-peer small-scale LAN for a small busi- 
ness environment. Will work with Windows. 


2-25 nodes 


Determined by cabling 




LAWN 

O'Neill Communications 
100 Ttianet Cir. 
Pfinceton, NJ 08540 
(609) 497-6800 


LAWN is a wireless computer connectivity device using spe- 
cial radio transmitters attached lo Ihe serial ports ol Ihe 
computersand peripherals involved. LWN software also con- 
tains the option of dividing the UWN network into four sepa- 
rate networks. If you need a LAN lor sharing a large data- 
base file. LAWN is not Ihe option to choose. LAWN is 
primarily intended for E-mail, transferring files, and sharing 
peripherals. Will work with Windows. 


2-100 nodes 


Up to 500 feet without obstruc- 
tions 




EasyOFFICE Network 
Server Technology 
2332-B Walsh Ave. 
Sania Clara. CA 95051 
(800) 835-1515 


EasyOFFICE connects computers and peripherals by their 
serial ports through a small central control box. No network 
adapter cards are needed, and the standard LAN features 
of peripheral sharing, file transfer, and messaging are incor- 
porated. The major difference is that with Ihe EasyOFFICE 
Nelwork, one computer cannol access applications from an- 
other computer's disk drive, but you can transfer flies. You 
can also operate another computer Irom your computer, 
wilh the remote PC's video display appearing on your 
screen. This limits application sharing to text-based applJca- 
lions, like word-processing programs and spreadsheets, 


2-32 nodes 


Up to 500 feet 




10NET (software) 

Sitka 

950 Marina Village Pkwy. 

Alameda. CA 94501 

(800) 445-8677 


10NET is a full-featured LAN suitable for home office use 
It offers numerous printing and security options. Will work 
with Windows. 


Determined by cabling 


Determined by cabling 






LapLink Pro is not a LAN; it's a file-transfer ulility program 
designed for laptop computers. It can be used equally well 
with desktop computers. No adapter cards required- 


2 nodes 


Up to 25 feet 




LapLink Pro 
Traveling Software 
18702 N.Creek Pkwy. 
Bothell.WA 98011 
(800)343-8080 




74 COMPUTE JULY 1992 









^ss 




WBSBBS^K^^^ffS 


HUPSi^l 


^■Pil^H 


H^^^H 




Transmission 
Rale 


RAM Used 


System 
Requirements 


Add-Ons 


Price 




10 Mbps (megabits per 
second) 


-tOK on servef, 12K on client 


IBM PC or compatible, hard 
disk recommended 


Longer cables, if desired 


S699 for AE-2 starter kit. includ- 
ing two adapter cards, software 
for up to 300 nodes, and ca- 
bles; $299 for node add-ons 




Up to 230.4 Kbps (kilobits per 
second; speed depends on 
nelworii type) 


Not available 


IBM PC or compatible (up to 25 
MHz). 384K RAM. hard disk 
recommended 


None 


$295 for soltware and hardware 
far one node, $195 for software 
only (adapter card required, 
node hardware cannot be pur- 
chased without the softwaie) 




115 Kbps 


30K 


IBlylPCorcompalihIe 


None 


$25 for startup kit 




10 Mbps 


Less than 52K to? client/server 


IBM PC or compatible, 512K 
HAM. hard disk recommentied 


Longer cable, if desired 


S515 for starter kit with two 8- 
bll adapter cards, software, and 
20-loot cable; $575 for starter 
kit with two 16-bit adapter 
cards, software, and 20-foot ca- 
ble; $149 for software only {un- 
limited users, adapter cards re- 
quired); node add-ons; S205 for 
8-bit card; S229 for 16-bit card 




2 Mbps 


26K for full peer-!o-peer net- 
work, 16K for server. 10K for 
client 


IBM PC or compatible. 640K 
RAM, hard disk (not required (or 

client) 


Longer telephone wire or ca- 
bles, if desired 


$199 lor starter kit with two 
adapter cards, software, and 25 
feet of telephone wire; node 
add-ons: $109 per adapter card 




Determined by cabling 


50K on client server. 25K on 
client 


IBM PC or compatible, hard 
(Jisi< 


Network adapter card for 
each PC 


$99 per node 




Serial linli 19.2 Kbps 


25K 


IBM PC or compatible. 512K 
RAM. hard disk recommended 


None 


$398 for each PC, serial printer, 
and modem transmitter; $489 
for each parallel printer transmit- 
ter (software IS included with 
each transmitter) 




115 Kbps on ATs ano 386s, 
19.2 Kbps on XTs 


45K 


IBM PC or compatible. 640K 
RAM, serial port, hard disk 
recommended 


Longer cable, if desired 


$499.95 for four connections; 
$749.95 for eight connections 




Determined by cabling 


93K minimum (comes witti its 
own memory manager) 


IBlyl PC or compatible, B-IOK 
RAM. hard disk recommended 


Network adapter cards and ca- 
bles not included in starter 
pack 


$299 for three-node starter 
pack, software only; S799 for 
len-node value pack, software 
only; $1 29 for node add-ons. soft- 
ware only 




116 Kbps (cable). 9.6 Kbps 
(modem) 


440K RAM 


IBM PC or compatible. 512K 
RAM. modem 


None 


$169.95 for software and cables 

— AUTUI^N MILLER 



JULY 1992 COMPUTE 75 



PERSONAL PRODUCTIVITY 



Rosalind Resnick 



Load die program into 

your computer 

and have one of ttie 

ricliest men in 

America as your 

personal 

investment coacii. 



BETTER TO GIVENS 
THAN TO RECEIVE 

Charles Givens has made a for- 
tune telling other people how 
to get rich. f\Jow, the king of 
self-help financia! books has 
set his sights on conquering 
the market for money-manage- 
ment software. His debut pro- 
gram is WealthStarter with 
Charles J. Givens (Reality Tech- 
nologies, 3624 (Market Street. 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
19104; 215-387-6055; $59.95). 
Simply load the Givens pro- 
gram into your home comput- 
er (the sales pitch goes) and 
make the master — Charles Giv- 
ens himself — your personal 
investment coach. 

"My strategies change peo- 
ple's lives," Givens says. 
"There hasn't been software be- 
fore that did that." 

Indeed, there hasn't. ButGiv- 
ens's rags-to-riches story 
shows that he's no stranger to 
doing v/hat others believe to 
be impossible. Born in Deca- 




tur, Illinois, to middle-class par- 
ents, Givens got hooked on 
self-improvement books grow- 
ing up, dropped out of col- 
lege, and went on to make 
and lose three fortunes. In the 
early 1980s, he started ped- 
dling tapes on investing. 
When a local newspaper re- 
porter mistakenly overstated 
his wealth, Givens seized up- 
on the angie of the millionaire 
telling ordinary folks how to 
make money. 

Today, the Charles J. Giv- 
ens Organization in Orlando 
has 425.000 dues-paying mem- 
bers nationwide. Givens's 
books. Wealth Without Risk 
and Financial Self-Defense, 
have sold millions of copies 
and topped the New York 
Times bestseller list for years. 

But along with success has 
come controversy Givens's de- 
tractors say that his advice — 
tips such as "Don't buy bonds 
when interest rates are rising" 
and "When in doubt, deduct 
it" — is simplistic at best and, at 
worst, downright dangerous. 
Last year, the Wall Street Jour- 
nal reported that the Securities 
and Exchange Commission 
and North Dakota state securi- 
ties regulators were investigat- 
ing several Givens companies. 

Givens isn't fazed by peo- 
ple who say his investment ad- 
vice is too simple. Givens 
says that investment is a long- 
term strategy and it's better in 
the short run to increase the 
power of the money you cur- 
rently earn. As for ttie govern- 
ment regulators; "When a busi- 
ness is as big as [ours], they 
ought to take a look." 

How you'll feel about Giv- 
ens's software will probably de- 
pend on your view of his invest- 
ment philosophy. As Givens 
says in his promotional litera- 
ture, "tf you like my books, 
you'll love my software." If. on 
the other hand, you think the 
books are hogwash, you prob- 
ably won't think much of the 
software, either. 



Stripped down to its essen- 
tials, WealthStarter with Char- 
les J. Givens is little more than 
a set of basic spreadsheets 
with 300 of Givens's trade- 
mark tips tossed in. Some ex- 
amples are "Put your financial 
goals In writing," "Purchase a 
plastic box for checks," and 
"Create your dream list." In 
fact, one of the program's key 
features is a blank Dream List 
worksheet with room for 100 
dreams such as "Buy two po- 
nies" and "Retire with lots of 
money." Another feature is an 
electronic version of Givens's 
7-Step Financial Plan, which in- 
cludes some rather obvious 
planning steps like "Itemize 
Your Expenses" and "Achieve 
Your Goals." Givens's spread- 
sheets, meanwhiie, don't do 
much more than you couid do 
with a sheet of paper and a $5 
calculator. 

That's not to say, of course, 
that WealthStarter is totally with- 
out merit. For financial novic- 
es who've never mapped out 
a budget or tallied up their net 
worth, Givens's program is a 
good place to start. The pro- 
gram's easy-to-follow screens 
prompt you to type in person- 
al financial data and help you 
build a 12-month budget and 
personal balance sheet in a 
matter of minutes. If you're al- 
ready using Quicken to pay 
your bills and v/rite your 
checks, you can import this da- 
ta directly into WealthStarter. 

For newcomers, WealthStar- 
ter offers 400 pages of tutori- 
als on stocks, bonds, mutual 
funds, and other topics. 

WealthStarter with Charles 
J. Givens won't make you rich 
overnight — though it can help 
you get your financial house in 
order and give you the disci- 
pline you need to sock away 
money and invest it wisely. 
And, finally, consider this: Giv- 
ens himself has lived out 175 
of his 188 original dreams, in- 
cluding becoming one of the 
richest men in America. lI 



76 COI^PUTE JULY 1992 



First We Ga/e 

OvERl Million People 

ATest Drive: 




Now We'd Like To Give 
Them Heart Failure 



yiccDlarie estaDllshed Itself as Ihc world's #1 producer ot 
dflvlng simulations long belore the "wannatees" learned to 
use a clutcti. 

And we're still on the pole position. Ttiis time with a game 
ttiat not only Impresses our own demanding customers, but 
the tougtiest critics In motorsports; ttie editors of Rosd & 
Track' magazine. 

Road S Track Presents GramI Prix UnMM" Is !rue to 
the Accolade racing tierllage; a qerf ect composite ot uncom- 
promising autfientlcity and drop dead excitement. 

Race five real Formula One cars - Including Williams- 





(( i>=ime^=^—\ 


■^^^ggM^T*"*^^ 






""^^i ' 


,.^:^3a^ 


:~i4m^miiMii^ms-. 


SjeiS 


i^^ 






Renault. McLaren-Honda and Ferrari; each wifh exacting per- 
formance characteristics. Blast through lair and foul weather 
on 16 Grand Prix courses from around the glotM. fi/loitel new 
courses after Grand Prix circuits of the past, present and 
future with the Unlimited Architect - an exclusive feature that 
allows you to create any numtKr of course designs. 

The new gold standard In racing - RoaS & Track Presents 
Grand Prix Unlimited. But then, what else would you expect 
from a company with a proven track record ? 

To ortSer, visit your tavorits software retailer or call 
1-800-245-7744. 




The best in entertainment software." 



Actual game screens from IBM PC VGA version. Other versions rrsy vary. Road & Track is a registered trademark of Hactiette Magazines Inc. used under license by Accolade, Inc. Grand Prix 
Unlimited is a trademark of Accolade, I nc All other product and corporate names are tradetrartis and roistered trademarks of their respective owners. © 1992 Accolade Inc. All rights resen/ed. 



Circle Reader Service Number 119 



ART WORKS 



Robert Bixby 



People base serious 

judgments about 

your intelligence on 

whetlier your 

writing follows the 

rules of 

standard Englisli. 



TAKING CARE OF 
THE TENSE 

Desktop publishers need a 
ready resource for style and 
grammatical advice. I consid- 
er myself lucky in thiis regard 
because I live in a university 
town where there are plenty of 
people experienced in profes- 
sional copy editing. We have 
a city library with an excellent 
reference desk staff. And on 
top of this, I work for a mag- 
azine ot national reputation. 
Any questions 1 have regard- 
ing style or usage are a tele- 
phone call away from being an- 
swered, In fact, I might spend 
less time getting the question 
answered than deciding 
which of my many resources 
is the most appropriate to use 
under the circumstances- 

It's a lonelier task elsewhere 
in the world, particularly for a 
desktop publisher who 
doesn't have a community of 
writers and editors, f^/lost writ- 
ers end up editing their own 
work as they turn to publish- 
ing, and in that situation, it isn't 




what you don't know that's dan- 
gerous, but what you know for 
sure that may be wrong. 

That last sentence was left 
knotty on purpose. It's long 
and difficult and full of depend- 
ent clauses and seemingly an- 
tecedentless pronouns. It's an 
example of the kind of sen- 
tence that gives a writer/editor 
fits. Is it right? Is it wrong? If it's 
wrong, how do you fix it? Some- 
times it's all right to make 
small grammatical mistakes, if 
doing so improves the flow of 
the writing. But someone has 
to draw the line between bad 
writing and a refreshing depar- 
ture from the strictures of the 
language. The author is the 
worst person for that job. 

And then there are the mis- 
takes that everyone makes, 
particularly if he/she/they 
didn't have the kind of Eng- 
lish instruction that seems to 
have become obsolete — 
agreement between subject 
and verb and between pro- 
noun and antecedent. Here's 
a simple test to check your 
knowledge: Is data singular, 
or are data plural? {Actually, 
it/they can be either.) 

If you face these questions 
every day, you need a gram- 
mar checker. Grammar check- 
ers will save you from embar- 
rassment, from error, and from 
obfuscation. Despite what 
might seem to be a liberal cli- 
mate in the writing world, 
where virtually anything is con- 
sidered acceptable syntax, se- 
rious judgments are made 
about you and your intelli- 
gence based on whether your 
writing follows the rules of stan- 
dard English. You can say, "It 
don't matter to me" and be 
well thought of. But if you write 
it in anything but dialogue, 
you'll lose all your authority. 

On the other hand, if you 
don't face questions about 
grammar every day in your ed- 
iting, you're in even greater 
need of a grammar checker. 
The English language has 



more catches than a mile of 
barbed wire. If they aren't snag- 
ging you regularly, that might in- 
dicate a surpassing knowl- 
edge of the language, but it's 
more likely that you aren't no- 
ticing the problems because 
you aren't aware of them. 

True, the work done by 
grammar checkers is some- 
times too complex for them. 
The more creative you are in 
your word use, the more like- 
ly they are to misunderstand 
your intent and improperly 
flag a sentence. That was the 
kernel from which many of the 
derisive early reviews grew: 
Reviewers, usually profession- 
al writers with years of experi- 
ence, would run their copy 
through the checker and 
then poke fun at the results. 
Checkers have improved to 
the extent that professionals of- 
ten use them routinely. The 
chief improvements (beyond 
better programming) include 
allowing you to shut off one 
feature or another and provid- 
ing specialized feature pre- 
sets for checking technical 
writing, business writing, cas- 
ual writing, and so forth. 

In addition to detecting ac- 
tual errors in your writing, how- 
ever, a grammar checker can 
catch you when you lapse in- 
to passive voice. Believe it or 
not, even if your sentences 
hew to all of the rules of good 
grammar, they can still be ter- 
rible sentences if they're writ- 
ten in passive voice. If you 
write "The window was bro- 
ken, and the house was bur- 
glarized" instead of "The bur- 
glar smashed the window 
and ransacked the house," 
you're guilty of using passive 
voice. Grammar checkers will 
alert you to this bad habit and 
force you to mend your ways. 

A grammar checker won't 
necessarily make you a better 
writer. But a grammar checker 
can be your best friend when 
it comes to making copy as 
clean as possible, □ 



76 COMPUTE JULY 1992 








Guy Spy Is a break-throush in adventure samlng 
featuring ftill-screen animated characters that are 
completely under your controll With over 1,500 frames of 
animation, five megabytes of graphic data and original music 
and sound effects, Guy Spy sets a new standard In adventure 
gaming excellence. 

As Guy Spy you are the government's most trusted and daring counter- 
espionage agent. Intelligence reports confirm the evil Baron Von Max has 
located the legendary Crystals of Armageddon. With the power of the crystals in the 
hands of this madman. Von Max v/ill have everything he needs to fuel his ultimate 
weapon of mass-destruction... the doomsday machine. 

you must chase Von Max and his henchmen around the globe in a desperate bid to 
save the world from his evil plans. If you fail, there Is no telling what kind of 
destruction Von Max vriil unleash on the worid. Your orders are simple: stop Von Max 
at any cost... before it's too late! 



^ T^g 

ReadySoft 



ReadySon Incorporatsd 
30 Werthelm Court, Suite 2 
Richmond Hill, Onlario, CaiuKta L4B 1B9 
Tri: (4161 731-^175 Fax: (416| 764-8867 



Circle Reader Service Number 251 



UL RIGHTS RESEnVCD 



DISCOVERY CHOICE 



ANTicipate the needs of your 

colony and fight hand-to-hand combat 

in this captivating simulation. 

Clayton Walnum 



SIMANT 

Maxis's first software "toy," 
SimCity, let simulation lovers 
become the mayors of their 
own towns. SimEarth, the sec- 
ond program in the line, im- 
bued players with the power 
to forge a world. Now, Maxis 
gives us SimAnt, which takes 
us not farther out into the uni- 
verse, but down into the 
ground, where we control the 
destiny of a nest of ants. 

This switch from the grand 
scale of SimEarth to the back- 
yard microcosm of SimAnt 
marks Maxis's return to a 
more easily manageable sce- 
nario. Players who found the im- 
mensity of SimEarth overwhelm- 
ing will be pleased with Sim- 
Ant's relative simplicity. With 
the excellent onscreen and in- 
manual tutorials, a novice ant 
lord needs only an hour or two 
to master basic gameplay. 

Still, in spite of its restraint, 
SimAnt provides both an en- 
grossing game and an interest- 
ing introduction to the lives 
and times of these pesky, ubiq- 
uitous six-legged critters. 
Over the course of the simula- 
tion, you'll control where the 
ants build their homes, how 
they find their food, and 
when they invade rival nests. 
You'll even lead them to ulti- 
mate victory as they overrun 
the yard's house and drive its 
occupants screaming into the 
night. Along with the fun, 
you'll learn much about these 
amazing insects. 

The program's easily man- 
ageable, Windows-like inter- 
face makes controlling your 
colony a snap. Using the Edit 
window, you can zoom in on 
the underground nest. There 
you'll see ants hatching, stor- 
ing food, nurturing their 
young, and performing other 
activities. By switching to the 




surface view, you 
can see your ants 
scurrying across 
the ground as they hunt 
for food, battle enemies, and 
avoid such deadly dangers 
as spiders, ant lions, and 
lawn mowers. Finally, in the 
Map window, you get a bird's- 
eye view of an entire patch or 
an expanded view that in- 
cludes all 192 patches, with 
graph lines showing the rela- 
tive strengths of the black 
and red armies. 

Like SimEarth, SimAnt can 
be played on several levels. If 
you're a beginner, you'll prob- 
ably start with the quick 
game, in which you must in- 
crease the size of your colony 
until you can kill all the red 
ants in your patch. When 
you've graduated to the full 
game, you must not only in- 
crease the size of your colony 
but also migrate to other patch- 
es in a quest to annihilate the 
red ants and drive the humans 
from their house. Finally, in the 
experimental mode, you manip- 
ulate the ants' universe in sev- 
eral ways, studying the effects 
your actions have on your tiny 
guinea pigs. 

A full game of SimAnt in- 
volves leading your horde 
through several stages of 
play. At first, you have only a 
newly hatched queen, who 



must dig 
a hole and start 
laying eggs. The first egg 
hatches into the yellow ant, 
which is the ant you control. 
Your initial task is to guide it 
to food. 

You find food by switching 
to the overhead view in the 
Map window, which shows 
the entire patch. After you've 
located the green area that 
marks a food cache, send 
your yellow ant scurrying after 
it. Watch out for spiders and 
ant lions, which love to 
munch on unwary insects. By 
the time you bring a few food 
balls back to the nest, other 
ants will have hatched. You 
can then recruit them to help 
gather food. 

Before long, you'll have 
built up a strong and thriving 
nest. When you've outpopulat- 
ed the red ants (and have plen- 
ty of food for energy), you can 
recruit an army of soldier ants 
to attack the red nest and de- 
stroy the red queen. Then you 
can breed new queens to 
send to new patches . You co nli n- 
ue in this way until you've de- 
stroyed all the red ants and tak- 
en over the humans' house. 

During a game, you have 
many tools at your disposal 



80 COMPUTE JULY 1992 



which allow you to control the 
ants and their universe (a 
backyard). You can, for exam- 
ple, display the various chem- 
ical scents (nest, trail, and 
alarm) your ants leave behind 
as they move about a patch. 
In addition, the Caste control 
allows you to choose the per- 
centage of breeders, workers, 
and soldiers born into your 
nest. The Behavior control 
lets you decide how many 
ants forage for food, dig new 
tunnels, or nurture the young. 
The History window provides 
access to graphs depicting 
ant populations, food storage, 
colony health, and even the 
number of ants eaten or 
killed. 

For ease of play, the most 
commonly used functions are 
represented by buttons on the 
windows. Also, a menu bar pro- 
vides access to many addition- 
al functions, including game 
saving and loading, game 
speed, music and sound tog- 
gles, and window selection. 
One menu function, aptly 
named Silly, turns your ants in- 
to wisecracking smart alecks 
who frequently stop what 
they're doing to blurt out such 
nonsense as "Eat poison, spi- 
der face!" and "Better dead 
than red!" 

In the experimental mode, 
the simulation operates much 
differently than in either of the 
game modes. To start, you're 
given a patch containing small 
black-ant and red-ant nests. 
You're also given a menu of 
tools that you can apply to the 
nests and their occupants. The 
Barriers tool, for example, lets 
you build walls anywhere you 
like on the current patch. Oth- 
er tools include the Dig/Fill tool 
for digging or filling in holes, 
the Add Food tool for feeding 
hungry ants, the Drop Trails 
tool for creating chemical 



trails, and the Insecticide tool 
for quickly killing off excess 
population. 

One of SimAnt's most impres- 
sive features is its Information 
window, which is a HyperCard- 
like database containing 
mounds of information about 
ants. Clicking on a card's sub- 
ject buttons takes you to other 
cards, while clicking on a high- 
lighted word displays a little 
pop-up window containing the 
word's definition. All the cards 
are linked into a complex tree 
that lets you foliow any subject 
line you like, fvlost of the cards 
in the stack contain pictures 
as well as text. 

SimAnt's well-written man- 
ual is a joy to read. Every 
page contains not only de- 
tailed program instructions 
but also plenty of humorous 
sidelines that will keep you 
grinning as you learn. 

As with any good manual, 
you first get a quick overview 
of the game's objective. Then 
you're guided through a 
hands-on tutorial that will 
have you controlling your 
ants in a surprisingly short 
time. Peppered throughout 
the manual are dozens of ant 
puns. You'll groan at such 
atrocities as "An ant with a 
split personality is a sibilANT" 

The second section of the 
manual offers a wealth of infor- 
mation about ants in the real 
world to readers who want to 
improve their gameplay or 
just increase their knowledge 
about these tiny insects. 
From general facts about 
ants to the specifics of how 
they eat, communicate, repro- 
duce, and fight — everything 
you've ever wanted to know 
about these insects is here. 

The manual's third section 
offers ANTcillary (blame f\/lax- 
is) information about ants, in- 
cluding many sources for fur- 




ther study, both fictional and 
nonfictional. Section 4 of the 
manual is a complete glossa- 
ry, bibliography, and index. 

All said and done, SimAnt 
is a war game, albeit one that 
blends education with blood- 
letting. What sets it apart 
from other war games is its 
unique scenario. Your sol- 
diers don't have two legs; 
they have six. The battlefield 
isn't the countryside of Eu- 
rope: it's a house and its back- 
yard. Your soldiers use no fan- 
cy weaponry; they fight hand 
to hand. Nevertheless, as in 
any other war game, the ob- 
ject is to defeat the enemy 
and take over its territory. 

Of course, to be success- 
ful in SimAnt, you must learn 
all you can about ants and 
their behavior. What a sneaky 
way to get an education. O 

circle Reader Service Number 301 



IBM PC and compatibles; 
640X RAM: EGA, MCGA, 
VGA, Hercules, or Tandy 
graphics; hard drive; 
supports Ad Lib, Sound 
Blaster, Sound Master, 
Roland MT-32, and Tandy 
sound— $59.95 

MAXIS 

Two Theatre Sq., Ste. 230 
Orinda, CA 945G3-3346 
(800) 33-MAXIS 



JULY 1992 COMPUTE 81 



PATHWAYS 



Steven Anzovin 



ECO LOGIC 



Going green 

makes good sense 

for business 

and lor personal 

reasons. 



Green computing seems to be 
catching on in many forms — 
especially in telecommuting 
and recycling, 

Telework advocates have 
long predicted that the comput- 
er will replace the car, and re- 
cently you could see some sol- 
id evidence of that. Commut- 
ers who once had to drive for 
hours to corporate centers in 
Los Angeles and San Diego 
now have an alternative that's 
closer to home. The Riverside 
Telecommuting Center, about 
60 miles southeast of Los An- 
geles in the town of Riverside, 
is a pioneering effort at cre- 
ating a satellite corporate com- 
puting center. Several 
companies, including Pacific 
Bell, Edison, Xerox. IBM, and 
Disney, are leasing or plan to 
lease office space in the cen- 
ter for white-collar employees 
who live in the Riverside area 
to let them avoid the three- 
hour commute into the city. 




CD-ROfvIs have finally ar- 
rived, along with the fvlultime- 
dia PC. Because many CD- 
ROf^yis contain time-depend- 
ent information, the discs be- 
come useless as soon as the 
information on them is outdat- 
ed. And unlike floppy disks, 
useless CD-ROfyis can't be 
reused, so most people just 
toss them. A CD manufacturer 
called Digital Audio Disc, a So- 
ny subsidiary in Terre Haute, 
Indiana, melts down discs 
that don't pass quality control 
and uses them to make CD 
packaging, but as yet there's 
no company that recycles 
used CD-ROIVls and audio 
CDs from consumers. Like- 
wise, it's possible to recycle 
the jewel box and plastic tray 
that CD-ROMs and audio CDs 
are packaged in, but so far on- 
ly the world's largest jewel box 
and tray manufacturer, Atlan- 
ta Precision Molding, has the 
facilities to do it, and the com- 
pany recycles only its own 
scrap. There's a niche for an 
enterprising plastics entre- 
preneur who wants to get into 
compact disc recycling, 

In another development, 
some CD-ROM distributors 
are turning away from plastic 
CD packaging altogether. Ap- 
ple Computer, which sends 
out thousands of CD-ROMs to 
Apple developers every 
month, now protects its discs 
with a cardboard sleeve in- 
stead of a jewel box, as does 
Educorp, the biggest distribu- 
tor of commercial Macintosh 
CD-ROMs. By the way, if you 
have lots of floppy disks you 
want to recycle, a company 
called Covenant Recycling 
Services (201-838-1336) will re- 
condition them and sell them 
through a middleman to 
schools and other outlets. 

In a previous column I men- 
tioned a Mac program called 
DynoPage that makes it easy 
to print documents on both 
sides of the paper. Robert G. 
Chaplick of Wheaton, Mary- 



land, notes that there are two 
much less expensive PC utili- 
ties for double-sided printing. 
One is a shareware program 
called Microtxt, which can be 
found in shareware catalogs 
and on several online servic- 
es; the other is PRNCOL (avail- 
able for $15 from Steve Fox, 
11515 113th Place NE, 
Kirkland, Washington 98033). 
Chaplick uses PRNCOL for all 
his printing and recommends 
it highly. If you want recycled 
paper to print on, there are sev- 
eral mail-order sources, includ- 
ing Earth Care Paper (4601 
Hammersley Road, Madison, 
Wisconsin 53711; 608-277- 
2900) and Inmac (1111 West 
North Carrier Parkway, Suite 
200, Grand Prairie, Texas 
75050; 800-547-5444). Inmac 
even offers hard-to-find recy- 
cled fanfold paper. 

More and more people are 
saving money by recycling 
their laser toner cartridges 
and reinking their printer rib- 
bons. Be sure, by the way, to 
use the newer soy-based rib- 
bon inks rather than petroleum- 
based inks and to keep rib- 
bons well inked to lubricate 
the printer head. Did you 
know that you can refill the ink 
cartridge in your Hewlett-Pack- 
ard DeskJet or DeskWriter print- 
er by yourself Bruce Marche- 
sani of Lyndhurst, New Jer- 
sey, sent in this tip. Simply use 
a hypodermic syringe to inject 
the empty cartridge with a 
new supply from a bottle of 
standard Shaeffer ink, which 
can be purchased in any sta- 
tionery store, or use a soy- 
based ink of similar viscosity. 
(Syringes are available from 
your local surgical supply 
house.) There's a little pinhole 
in the top of the ink cartridge 
that allows you to do this. 

Share your tips on green com- 
puting. Send your ideas to me 
at Box 2173, Amherst, Massa- 
chusetts 01004. Maybe you'll 
see your name and idea in a fu- 
ture column. D 



82 COMPUTE JULY 1992 



CHIPS&BITS GAMES FOR LESS CALL 800 753 GAME 



IBM WARGAMES IBM STRATEGY 

Action Sigiions $29 Conquered Kingdoms 

AclDin Stations Seen 1 Su Crisis in ttie Kremlin 

AlScd Forces Bundle S29 Dragon Lord 

Amer Civil War I • 3 Ea S22 Dune 

Ancient An dI War S29 Empire 

Battles ol Napoleon S32 Empire Deluxe 

S42 Final Conflict 

329 Fi;eTeam2200 

S37 FireTeam Const Kit 

529 FortApaclie 



Bismark 
Blilzl^rieg Ardennes 
Bravo Romeo Delia 
Cam pa ^n 



UGW\BRiap!: 




■CHAHGE OF 
THE LIGHT BRI- 
GADE' lecieales 
the bailie of 
Balaclava dunnj 
the Crimean War, 
Defend using ihe 
smaller B'ltish 
Freflcli. and Turk- 
ic Forces or the 
alladung Russians. 
Featuresaninaied 
figures, indivtiual 
or group com- 
mands. 2 players & 
an improved mrwse 
inierlace, $34 



Carriers at War 
Carrier Stnke 
Charge LIghl Brigade 
Ci«l War SSI 
Cohon 

Conflcl. Korea 
Confl ct: Widflle East 
Confict in Vietnam 
Dedsbn al Gettysburg S29 
Dreainoughts $^2 

DrBadnougfits:!rondadsS29 
Dreadnoughts: Bismart^ S29 
Fiie Bngade JM 

GEN OTRS GAMES S2t 
GettysburgTurnmg Pnt S37 
Ha:isofMonteiuma S2i 
Harpoon S25 

Harpoon Set 2 or 3 S1S 
Harpoon Set 4 S24 

Harpoon Challenger PakS42 



IBM STRATEGY 

$36 SimEarth $41 

$37 Slai Control 2 537 

$12 Starlleet1or2 $38 

$29 Task Force 1942 $39 

$31 ThealieotWar $32 

$42 Traders S29 

$34 Uiopla S3I 

S29 Visions ol Afte-'math $12 
SS Warlords $29 

$34 Worlds at War $29 

IBM ADVENTURE 
Advnis Willie Beamlsn $3^ 
Advnis Wil'ie Beamish 2 539 
Code.name tceman 2 S39 
Coionei Beouesi 2 $34 
Conquests o( Longbow $34 
ConspiracyDeadlock $34 
Coven Action 529 

Cruise for a Corpse 534 
De!aVu2LostinLV Si 2 
Doni Go Alone S 9 

Eco Quest 1 $34 

Felony $12 

Free DC 529 

Gateway 535 

Godlatliei $32 

Heal of Ctiina $34 

Hostage S 9 

Indy Jones L Crsd vga $27 
Indy Jones Fate Allamis $38 
S32 KingsOuestlEnhncd $34 
S32 Kin^ s Quest 2 or 3 536 
$19 King s Quest 4 $34 

$37 KingsQuest5or6VGAS39 
$37 Leather Goddesses 2 $42 
$34 Leisure Sun Lfiy 2, 3, 5 534 



IBM SPORTS 

Grelsky League 

Hardball 2 

HardbalS 

John El«a/'s QB 

LH 3 In 1 Football 

LHBoKng 

LH College Basketball 536 

LH Full Count Baseball 536 

LH Hooey 536 

LH Pro Basketball 536 



526 
523 
S34 
S6 
$36 
$36 



IBM TRADITIONAL 

Centerfold Squares 521 
Check Mate DOSiWIN $36 
ChessmaslerSOOO $32 
Chessmasier 3000 WIN 538 
Dealers Choice Poker $32 
Edwrd Thrp Bicii Jck $19 
Femmes Falale $26 

Femmes Fatale Disk $ia 
GO Master 5 Dli $t09 
GO Master 5 DOS."WIN $39 



IBM ROLE PLAYING 
Might i Magic t or 2 $12 



IBM $IMULAT10N 

F15SE2Si:enanoDlsk $17 



$37 
538 
59 
$37 




■DREADNOUGjnS- 

s a surface fleet 
Ijattle simulator. It 
recreales the look, 
spedlicatons, and 
tactics offleetcom. 
oat. Features 30 
views, comprehen. 
sive manuals and 
sea charts, a po- 
tent English com- 
mand parser, lor 2 
player mode and 
computer con- 
trolled ships, gun- 
nery and damage 
control. S42 



539 
532 



Global Conquest 

Global ElfacI 

KoshanConspitacy 

Lemmings 

Lemmings Dala Disk 

L'Empereur 
$37 Liberty or Death 
S 9 Lost Admiral 

Lost Admiral Enhanced 538 Leisure Suil Lrry Bundle 539 

Lost Admiral Scenario 523 Loom 519 

Medieval Lords 537 Lost in LA 537 

Merchant Co'ony 534 Lost Treasures Iniocom $42 



Kamptgiuppe 
MacArthur's War 
Panzer Battles 
Patriot 

Patriot Battle Sets Ea 
Pattoi Strikes Back 
Red Lightning 
Romnel North Africa 
Rorke's Drih 
Second front 
SIM CAN GAMES 
StOrT Across Europe 
Third Reich 
Typhoon ol Steel 
UMS2 

UMS2 Civil War 
UMS2DesehStorm 
UMS 2 Planel Ed-tor 
V lor t/iclory 
Walertoo 
Western Front 
White Death 



NEMESIS 



GQ K^LASriSR 







$37 

529 

$22 

53S 

524 

$37 

$12 

$24 

$34 

$37 

$36 

$12 

$27 

$12 

SIS Pacific Theater of Oper 542 

$24 Pedeci General $34 

$20 Perfect General Disk 2 523 

$28 Populous 2 

S38 Power Monger 

$12 Power Monger WW1 

$37 OOP Burde 

$29 Railroad Tycoon 



'NEMESIS GO 
VERS DELUXE' IS 

;ne utmate com- 
pulei GO program. 
Wi:h 'he s:-plcity 
ofchecke'sardtne 

— con^plexil/ o( 
chess, GOisaseri- 
ciu';?'faiegygame. 

_ :-.i.c.;s.GOMAS- 
T-;". 1 oasic GO 
piayei a tutor, 
Joseki Genius adds 
complex corner 
openings. Tactical 
Wizard and GO 
Scribbler. S109 



FORTAPAfffR 




FORT APACHE' 

lets you take cha'ge 
of a detachment of 
cavalry troopers in 
Ihe wild wesi You 
are responsible for 
Iraining them and 
bringing their com- 
bat abilities up to 
par. Features indi- 
vidual orgrouo con- 
trol, cholceolweap- 
cns. a wide variety 
it missions, de 
tailed troop slats, a 
large play area, S 
promotKins. $34 



IBM STRATEGY Rampin $27 

A Iran $42 Realms S29 ABC Bowng 

Arniaoa2525 $32 Renegasl8Leg;onlntrcot512 All Amencan College FbS36 



Magnetic Scrolls Bndl S34 

Martian Wemorandum $37 

Out of this Word $36 

Plan 9 from Outer Space$3l 

Police Quest 1 $26 

Police Quest t VGA $34 

Police Quest 2 or 3 $34 

$38 Rise ol the Dragon $34 

534 Seen Monky Isind Ivga 523 

521 Seen Monky Isktd 2 533 

$59 Sex Oympics $24 

$34 Sex Viiens Iron Space $12 

Sierra Adventure Bundle$35 

Space Quest 2 5K 

Space Quest t , 3 or 4 534 

Space Quest 5 VGA 

Space Quest Bundle 

SpellcastinglOl 

Spellcasting201 

StarlrekS 

Startrek25thAniversry 536 
Time Quesi 519 

Tram $ 6 

Uninvited 5 9 

Where AmrcasPstCSD $37 
Where Europ. USA. time$30 
Where World CSO $27 

Where WoildCSDDIi $49 

ISM SPORTS 

4D Boxing $17 

4th & Inches $ 9 

$32 



LH Team Disits 
LH League Leaders 
LH Utility Disks 
IjnksGoll 
Links Goll WIN 
Lnks Course 1 -6Ea 
Madden Football 2 

MaglcJohnsonFstBrk $ 6 

Maho Andrettt Racing $17 
MLBasbllMngr'sChllng$24 

ML Word Series DIste $17 

MLTO -982 -1990 Ea $17 

ML Franchise Disks Ea $20 

Micipleague Basketball $28 

ML Personal Pro Goll $28 

ML Football Deluxe $39 

ML Ftball Team Disks 517 

Michael Jorxlan Fit Sim $44 

Mike Di*a Football $32 

NFL Challenge $60 

NFL Football $31 

NFL 1984- 1987 Ea $15 

NFL 1988- 1991 Ea $22 

NFLProleague Football 524 

NIcklaus Signature Edit 539 

Nicklaus SE Clip Art $24 

Nicklaus Unlimited Golf 529 

NG Clip Art $17 
NG Course 1,2,3,4. or 5$15 

Peie Rose Baseball $ 9 

PGA Tour Goll $32 

PGA Tour Goll WIN 538 

PGA Tour Goll Disk 1 $17 

PGA Tour Goll Ltd Edt 545 

Pro Football Analyst $34 

Pro Tennis Tour 2 $32 

Road to Ihe Final Four $37 



GO Masler 5 Toolkit 539 
Grand Slam Bridge 522 
Hong Kong Wah Jong 532 
Hoyle Book Games 1012521 
HoylB Book Games 3or4 529 
Jeopardy Silver Edillon $15 
Monopoly S24 

Omar ShanI on Bridge B37 
Penthouse Jigsaw $24 
Risk WIN 529 

Scrabb'e Deluie 534 

Shanghai? $24 

Stratego >3i 

Strip Poker 3 531 

Strip Poker Data 1-5 Ea $19 
Trump Castle 2 529 

Video Poker DOS WW $34 
Wheel ol Fortune Gok) 515 
Woidlfis 529 

WorkJ Champ Backgmn 524 
WoiW Champ Cnbbage 524 

IBM ROLE PLAYING 
Bards Tale 2 SI9 

Bard's Tale 3 531 

Bard B Tale Cnstrcln St Sl9 
Batiletech 2 $31 

Buck Rogers 1 512 

Suck 2: Malrii Cubed $32 
Caplam Blood 5 9 

Celtic Legends $32 

Champions $37 

CHARACTR EDITORS 516 



Might & Magic 3 
Might i Magic 4 
Pirates 
Planet's Edge 

Sea Rogue 539 

Sentinel Worlds $15 

Space 1889 $t6 

Space Inc 534 

Spellbound $39 

Statfl^hl 1 or 2 519 

Sword of the Samurai 5 9 
Swrd Samrai i Pirates 516 
Tales Magsc: Prophcy S $38 
Third Couner S 6 

Tunnels 1 Trolls $12 

Twil^ht 2000 S34 

Ultima Marten Dreams S37 
Ultima Savage Em^re S34 
Ultima Tntogy S35 

Ultima Tnlojy 2 S45 

Ultima 1-6 Bundle CD $59 
Ultima 6 False Prophet $39 
Ultima 7 Black Gale $45 
Ultima Stygian Abyss 
Uncharted Waters 
Wizardry Tnlogy 
Wizardry 4 
Wizardry 5 
Wizardry 6 Cosmo Frg 537 
Wizardry 7 Crusaders 539 

IBM AD ID 
ADSD Bundle 
Champions ol Krynn 
Curse of Azure Bonds 
Da/k Queen of Krynn 
Death Kn^hts of Krynn $20 
Dragons ol Flame 512 

Eye ol Ihe Behokfer 532 
EyeollheBetwkter? $38 



F15 Strike Eagle 3 
F19 Stealth Fighter 
F22 ATF 
Falcon 3,0 
Flight Simulator 4 
Fly Grand Canyon 3D 
Gunship 
Gunship20O0 
Harrier Combat Sim 



$10 
$10 
$10 
$10 
$1S 



$4e 
$42 
S32 
519 
$32 



538 
520 
515 
532 




HINT BOOKS 

AD5D HINTBOOKS 
Bards Tale I - 3 Ea 
Buck Rogers 1 
Buck 2: Matrix Cubed 
Civilization 
Dyn« Great War Planes 516 
Elvira lor 2 $10 

Ha'poon Baltlebook $19 
Indy Jones Lst Crsade $10 
Indy Jones Fate Atlantis 510 
-REALMS' is a 
strategy game in a 
fantasy setting, 
Youc^cantrot12fi 
armies, each a 
thousand strong 
with definable 
battle formations 
consisting ol 6 dis- 
tinct tiumanoid 
races, March your 
men over 125,003 
square miles of 
fraclaiiygeneraled 
landscape Id obtain 
countless lolkiwers 
and gold. $29 



Heros of the 357lh 
Hyperspeed 
Jel Fighler 2,0 
Land, SeaiAirlot2 
Lite S Death tor2 
Ml Tank Plaioon 
Mantis ExpmlnB Fghti 
Wegafortress 
Megafniss Mssn 1 or 2 527 
Hed Baron VGA 534 

Red Baron Mssn t or 2 524 
fled Stonn Rising $12 



$10 
$13 
$10 
$16 
$16 



The 
Perfect 
General 



'PERFECT GEN- 
ERAL' IS a turn 
based ground war 
game. Featu,'e3i2 
years ol play test- 
l-ig. VGA maps, 
easy to use mouse 
nr keytward inter- 
lace, 14scenarios, 
stiong aliliQal in- 
lelligence. hKJden 
movement, line ol 
sight option, in 
tfepth player rank- 
ng system, 2 
ptayer, with modem 
support, $34 



Jelfghter 2 516 

Loom 510 

Ldrd of Ihe Rings 1 or 2 $10 

LucasAnsAdveniure $16 
Magic Candle 1 or 2 
Mariian Dreams 
Matnx Cubed 
Might S Magic 3 
Planet's Edge 

Populous 1S20lfid Sir $16 

Power Monger 516 

Quest lot Clues 2, 3or4 $21 

Rairoad Tycoon $10 

Savage Empre $10 

Secret kinky Isind lor 2 510 

SIERRA HINTBOOKS $10 

Simaty.Simearth $20 

Starfl^hl 1 or 2 $10 

Strategy Plus 3 -11 Ea 5 8 

Strategy Plus 12-18 S5 

Ultima 4 - 7 Ea $10 

Ultima Avaiar Adventrs 514 

Wizardry 6 Cosmic Frg $12 

Wizardry 7 Crusade $12 

Yeager's Air ComUal $16 



Reel Fish'n 

Tom Landry Football 

Tony LaRussa Basebll 



T LaR Fantasy Managr 515 

TL5Ru;s3S*g't-^"s $15 



Conan 

Cyberspace 
Oari^lanrJs 
Ousk ol the Gods 
Elvira I Mistress Dart! 
Elvira 2 Jawirs Cerberus $39 
Flames ol Freedom $28 
Hero's Quest 2 or 3 $34 
Hyperspeed 534 

t-n-r-otal $17 



$29 
529 
539 
538 
$34 




he 'THUNDER 
BOARD' isasound 
boaidlhaiislOO* 
compatible with 
Soundblasler and 
Adiib, II reproduces 
digitized sounds 
using an8bilDAC, 
Features include 
dynamic filtering, 
1 1 Voice FM music 
synihesizer, sam- 
Iplmg rale up to 22 
KHz. microphone 
input, joystickport, 

Will mid ^^^*^'""*" 

mlWin amplilier. $84 



Gateway Savge Fiontf $32 
Heroes olttia Lance $12 
Pool of Darkness $33 

Pool ol Radiance $15 
Secret o( Silver Blades 515 
Shadow Sorcerer $32 

Tieasurs Savage Frontr $32 
War of the Lance $ 9 

IBM HARDWARE 
Ad Lb Sound Carl $59 
Ad Ub Gold 1000 $179 
Adiib Surround Scund $64 
Adiib Telephone ktodule $64 



Sailing Simulator $39 

Sailing Sim Voyages Ea $34 
Secret Weapons Lftwff $44 
S Weapons Eipl -4 $21 
Shuttle 534 

Silent Service 2 534 

Strike CoTTLmander $45 
Team Yankee $34 

Team Yankee 2 $29 

Tesl Dnve 2: Collection $34 
Test Drive 3 $32 

TD3 Road S Car Disk $19 



CHIPS & BITS 

PO Box 234 

Rochester VT 05767 

Fax 802-767-3382 

802-767-3033 

800-753-4263 

GEnle Keyword CHIPS 

We accepl Visa. MC SMoney 
Orders. COD add $5. Checks 
Held 4 Weeks. Most items 
shipped sameday Allstiippirg 
rales are per order noi p«i item. 
UPS $4 : 2 Day Ar 56: Mail $5: 
Airmail Canada 56: HI . AK, PR, 



Ad Lib Speakers 


515 


Flight Stick 


$43 


Flight Slick w Falcon 


$46 


Sound Basler 


$109 


Sound Blaster Pro 


$189 


Snd Blaster Speakers 


$15 



Band 1 Kings Anc. China$37 
Battle Isle $32 

Breach 2 Enhanced $19 
Breach 2 Scenario Disk $15 
Castles $36 

CasUes Disk i 519 

Civilization SS 

Command HQ $19 



Revolution 76 529 

Romanc3Kngdm1or2 $42 

Rules of Engagement $37 

Second Conflict WIN $34 

Siege 538 

Sim Ani $37 
SimCity 



APBA Baseball 
APBA 1908 - 9- Ea 
APBA Basketball 
APBA Bowling 
APBA Football 
APBA Micro Manager 
Greens 



SlmCity Graphic 1 or 2 523 Grftsky Hotkey 2 



TLaRTeams1901-68 S15 
Weaver Baseball 2.0 S3! 
Weaver Commlsnr 2.0 $21 
Weaver 2 1 990 TeamsSl 6 
Weaver 2 OComm Edt S56 
WorkfCrcui: $34 

IBM TRADmOHAL 
Amanllo Slim Poker 512 
Backgammon WIN St 9 
Battle Chess WIN $29 
Blackiack DOSWIN 519 

Circle Reader Service Number 149 



Thruslmaster Joystick $69 
Thrustmsir Pro Joystlck$109 
Thmstmsir Weapn Cntrl $79 
Thunder Board SndBrd $84 
Thunder Board Spkrs $15 

IBM SIMULATION 
At Avenger $43 

Aces of Ihe Pacific $39 
Aces Paeilic Mssn i or 2527 
Aces over Europe $46 
Aces Europe Mssn 1 or 2S27 




■RORKES DRIFT 

IS a detailed simu- 
lation ol the battle 
between 137 Bn- 
ishsok)iersi400C 
Zulu warriors tftat 
took place Jan 22 
1879. You control 
each man, stand- 
ing, sitting, prone, 
aiming, tiring, re- 
taading. running or 
walking. With 3D 
map, animated 
combat S move- 
ment mouse sup- 
port & VGA. 534 



Legacy oINecromance 


rS29 


ATP 


$37 


TFH&BH1942 


Lord of the Rings 1 


534 


B17 Flying Fortress 


539 


Ultrabols 


Lord of the Rings 2 


$37 


Buzz AkJhn Race Spc 


$37 


Virtual Reality Studio 


Loremastef 


S39 


Car J Dnver 


S38 


Wing Commander 1 


Lure ol ifie Temptress 


$37 


Design yr own RaJroad $29 


WCl Mission lor 2 


Magic Candle 1 


512 


Dynamics Bundle 


$39 


WCl Bundle 


Magic Candle 2 


537 


Elite Plus 


519 


Wing Com manOei2 


Mechwariiot 


$34 


Eye Dlitie Storm 


529 


WC2 Operations 1 or 2 


Uegatraveller 1 


$16 


F1l7ANighlha»k 


$42 


WC2Spea!;hPack 


Megatravellei 2 


$19 


FI4 Tomcat 


526 


Wolfpack 


Megatraveilei 3 


$39 


F15 Stnke Eagle 2 


$19 


Yeager s At Combat 



$44 2 Day Ajr$i2: Ajmiail Europe 

$37 $12 frsi item plus $6 per add- 

$49 lenaliiem. 
$39 

$19 AM Sales Final. Ctieck 

545 MmpatlWIitybelofsyoubuy, 

$45 Shipping limes not 

$27 guaianleeii. Defeclives 

$15 replaced with same product. 

$15 Price i availability subject 

$38 to change. 



MULTIMEDIA PC 



David English 



Great Literature- 
Personal 
Library Series 
otters over 
goo classic literary 
works on a 
single CD-ROM. 



INSTANT LIBRARY 

We hear a lot about tiow a sin- 
gle CD-ROM can hiold a room- 
ful of books. It sounds great, 
but do you really want your 
books on a small plastic disc? 
You wouldn' t want your phone 
book available only on disc; 
you would have to boot up 
your computer every time you 
needed to make a phone call. 

On the other hand, you 
might like an encyclopedia on 
CD-ROM— you could perform 
elaborate searches, paste por- 
tions of the text directly into 
your word processor, hear 
music and speeches, and pay 
much less for the electronic ver- 
sion than the traditional multi- 
volume hardcover edition. 

The company that's done 
the most to champion the 
cause of books on disc is the 
Bureau of Electronic Publish- 
ing (141 New Road, Parsippa- 
ny, New Jersey 07054; 800- 
828-4766). 

The Bureau not only publish- 
es its own titles but sells other 
CD-ROfvIs as well. Its catalog 
is an excellent short course in 
the technology of CD-ROfyi 
and the many titles that are 
available in this rapidly chang- 
ing market. 

The Bureau's most recent ti- 
tle under its own name is 
Great Literature — Personal Li- 




brary Series ($99). It contains 
over 900 classic literary 
works: 72 plays (including 
those of Aeschylus and nearly 
all of Shakespeare's): 75 es- 
says (including "The Sayings 
of Confucius" and "The Get- 
tysburg Address"); 31 biogra- 
phies, journals, and letters (in- 
cluding Plutarch's Lives and 
The Autobiography of John Stu- 
art Miil); 461 poems (including 
Paradise Lost and Rime of the 
Ancient Mariner): 199 fiction- 
al works (including Thousand 
and One Nights, Canterbury 
Tales, Divine Comedy and Al- 
ice's Adventures in Wonder- 
land); 32 historical docu- 
ments (including "The Declara- 
tion of Independence" and 
"The Constitution of the United 
States"); and more. 

It's a treasure trove of well- 
known and obscure works com- 
bined with hundreds of color 
illustrations, excerpts of period 
music, and CD-quality read- 
ings by television and movie 
stars. (Where else can you 
hear George Kennedy read An- 
tony's "Friends. Romans, coun- 
trymen ..." speech?) 

The easy-to-use search en- 
gine lets you quickly find any 
word or passage on the disc 
and organize the index by au- 
thor, title, or type of literature. 
It may not all be great litera- 
ture, and you may miss the fan- 
cy leather bindings, but you 
certainly get your money's 
worth with this CD-ROM. 

You say you don't have time 
to read the great works of lit- 
erature? You're more a Mon- 
arch Notes type of person? 
Then you'll be interested in the 
Bureau's Monarch Notes on 
CD-ROfVl (S99). !t contains the 
full text of the entire collection — 
over 200 different titles. Use it 
to help you through that nine- 
teenth-century novel course or 
to impress your semiliterate 
friends, 

Actually, fvlonarch Notes on 
CD-ROM can be a valuable sup- 
plement to your reading of the 



great works of literature and is 
a useful companion piece to 
the Bureau's Great Literature 
CD-ROt^. Like the Literature 
CD-ROM, Monarch Notes 
includes pictures and illustra- 
tions, as well as selected 
readings. 

For history buffs, the Bureau 
offers U.S. History on CD-ROM 
($395). It contains the fuli text 
of 107 books on U.S. history, in- 
cluding books on Pearl Harbor, 
the Apollo expeditions to the 
moon, the Manhattan Project, 
America's drug habit, U.S. en- 
vironmental quality, black Amer- 
icans, and much more, Throw 
in the Nixon Watergate tapes. 
Congress's three-volume Iran- 
Contra Affair report, and 1000 
VGA photos, maps, and tables 
of historical events, and you 
have enough material to chal- 
lenge any armchair historian. 

If your quest for knowledge 
leads you toward a more glob- 
al view, you might take on the 
Bureau's two world-class titles: 
Countries of the World ($395) 
and World Fact Book ($99). 

Countries of the World in- 
cludes 106 different U.S. Army 
Country Handbooks, each rang- 
ing from 200 to 500 pages, The 
Handbooks are supplemented 
with information from 151 U.S. 
embassies and hundreds of col- 
or maps. 

World Fact Book is pro- 
duced annually by the CIA for 
U.S. government officials. 
Along with the text, it includes 
selected maps, flags, and na- 
tional anthems. No, the CIA 
didn't include its classified 
information. 

All five of these CD-ROMs 
run under DOS. While they 
don't require an MPC, they will 
run on one. In addition, the 
same disc works with both PCs 
and Macs. 

If you're looking to build up 
your reading library but you 
don't have a lot of shelf space, 
take a look at these and other 
CD-ROMs from the Bureau of 
Electronic Publishing. □ 



84 COMPUTE JULY 1992 



GET THE 

OFFICIAL CLUES TO THE 

HOTTEST GAMES! 



<=r THE OFFICIAL BOOK OF 

KING'S 



THE OFFICIAL GUIDE TO 




JRmX. ROADIE ■ 



Donald B. TtiVCtte 
Foievford by K6bat» WiUbm* 

Kind's QncSi J-V and the Uttst on Slttia's 
0>-KOM <kn 




THEOFnCIALBOOKOF 

KING'S QUEST, 

SECOND EDITION 

Here's the source for hints, 
tips, and bacl^ground for the newest 

adventure. King's Quest V. 

This new volume includes more clues, 

maps, and inside details, 

along with more ways to add even 

■ more tun to all five of the 

best-selling King's Quest games. 

Covers King's Quest I - V. 



TMEOFnCIALQUIDETO 

SID MEIER'S 

RAILROAD TYCOON 

This is the book that makes 
railroading and the game come alive. 

Inside players will find interviews 

with Sid ivleier, the designer of Railroad 

Tycoon, along with facts 

on how the product was conceived 

and developed. Also 

includes formulas the program uses to 

determine income and expense. 




THE OFFICIAL 6UIDE TO 

ROSER WILGO'S 

SPACE ADVENTURES 

For the first time, 
Space Questers can learn what goes 

on in the mind of the most 
legendary janitor in the universe. Inside, 

you'll find complete maps (or every 
Space Quest scenario, point values for 

every reaction, and Roger's 
walk-through to the finish of all ttie games. 
Covers Space Quest I • IV. 



YES! ° 



want more hints and tips! Please 
send me the books checked below. 

D The Official Book of King's Quest, Second Edition (2452) S12.95 
D Tlie Ofticial Guide la Roger Wilco's Space Adventures (237) $14.95 
D Tlie OKiciai Guide to Sid Meier's Raiiroad Tycoon (2443) S12.95 



Iota! Numljer ol Books 
Total Cost of Boohs Ordered 



l: 



Sales Tai (Resider;ts ol NY, NC, and NJ add appropriale sales lax for 
yoyr area. Canadian ofders add 7% goods and services tax.) 

Shipping and Handling: $2 per Ixxik U.S.; $4 Canada: 
$6 foreign. 

Total Enclosed 



D Check or Money Order 
Signature 



DMC nvisA 



n 



Accl. No. 



Name . 



Exp. Date . 



Please Print 



Street Address . 
City 



.Stale, 



Zip. 

All orders must be paid in U.S. funds drawn on a U.S. bank. 

Mail this entire coupon to: 
COMPUTE Books 
c/o CCC 

2500 McClellan Ave. 
Pennsauken, NJ 08109 



Offer good while suppfies tast. 



7H32C 




ENTERTAINMENT CHOICE 



Sharp graphics and digitized sounds make 

this game's absorbing story tine come to life and 

captivate you with unsurpassed adventuring. 

Alfred C. Giovetti 



EYE OF THE 
BEHOLDER II: 
THE LEGEND OF 
DARKMOON 

You and the other heroes of 
the battle for the sewers have 
settled in for your night's re- 
past before the warm hearth 
of the most inviting inn in Wa- 
terdeep when there comes a 
call for assistance. Soon, you 
find yourself slogging 
through the torrential rain 
with your friends, wincing at 
the peals of thunder as you ap- 
proach a dark doorway. A 
rough-looking, large servant 
greets you and quickly ushers 
you into the presence of 
Khelben, one of the ruling 
lords of Waterdeep. After be- 
ing briefed on recent disap- 
pearances of important 
agents and some other 
strange happenings in the ar- 
ea, you're teleported into the 
center of an adventure — far 
from the meal and bed of the 
inn. 

And you're launched into 
perhaps the best of all first- 
person adventure games, full 
of seat-of-the-pants suspense 
and hair-pulling mystery. Stra- 
tegic Simulations' Eye of the 
Beholder II: The Legend of 
Darkmoon will capture your 
imagination and hold you pris- 
oner in front of your computer 
for days — nay, weeks — of en- 
tertainment. 

Darkmoon is true to the 
rules, classes, artifacts, and lo- 
cations contained within the 
Forgotten Realms Fantasy 
World, a favorite world in Ad- 
vanced Dungeons and Drag- 
ons. In many ways, one of the 
most exciting things about 
this excellent adventure is its 
faithful portrayal of this popu- 
lar fantasy world. 




Darkmoon 
has its share 
of gratuitous vio- 
lence, from the slaying of 
the suspiciously friendly 
clerics to the gruesome 
and dangerous final bat- 
tle with the red dragon, 
fvlany of the monsters 
from the first Eye of the Behold- 
er are back to plague the par- 
ty of four adventurers and as 
many as two nonplayer char- 
acters. There are new, more le- 
thal monsters. Frost giants pum- 
mel your entire group with one 
blow from a massive six-foot 
fist. Medusas positively rivet 
those unable to escape their 
irresistible charms. You're nev- 
er really sure what will be lurk- 
ing around the next corner or 
what will come looking for you 
out of the distant shadows. 

Exploration and mapping 
are needed to get through the 
maze, so get out the pencils, 
rulers, and graph paper, as 
this game lacks an automap- 
ping feature. Some of the puz- 
zles are the find-the-minuscule- 
button type; others involve 
knowing the pattern of levers 
to pull or the floor switches to 
weight with stones. Solutions 
range from the obvious to the 
obscure, Some require the te- 
dious process of kicking all 
walls to see if they hide a se- 
cret wall; others require a ba- 
sic knowledge of statistical com- 
binations and permutations. 

Characters can be rolled 



up by the com- 
puter, transferred 
from the original 
Eye of the Beholder, 
selected from a pre- 
rolled quick-start party, or 

modified to fit the statistics 
of your favorite character 
from any computer or paper- 
and-pencil role-playing game. 
They're constructed from two 
genders, six basic attributes, 
nine types of two-dimensional 
moral alignment, and six ba- 
sic professions as provided in 
the Advanced Dungeons and 
Dragons second edition. You 
can — and should — take your 
favorite characters and weap- 
ons into the game. 

Darkmoon's interface is lit- 
tle changed from its award- 
winning predecessor. The first- 
person perspective uses the 
upper left portion of the 
screen. The remainder of the 
screen is filled by the charac- 
ter display, compass, mouse- 
activated cursor icons, and 
message area. The compass 
is replaced by a Spell menu 
when a holy symbol or spell 
book is clicked on. Clicking 
on a character portrait chang- 
es the character display to an 
equipment or attribute list. 
Equipment is displayed in pa- 
per-doll fashion, so that you ac- 
tually put "clothes" on the char- 
acter graphics or place weap- 
ons in their hands. 

The first-person display 



86 



COMPUTE JULY 1992 



changes little in combat, 
save for tlie approach of the 
antagonist. Played through a 
Sound Blaster sound card, dig-- 
itized sounds of metal on met- 
al and grunts of characters 
punctuate the battle realistical- 
ly. Combat is carried out in real- 
time and involves clicking on 
weapons to strike opponents 
in a melee, to launch missiles, 
or to open the Spell menu to se- 
lect an appropriate combat 
spell. Arrows, daggers, rocks, 
and spells can be seen flying 
tfirough the air toward their in- 
tended targets. 

If the battle grows too in- 
tense, you can back away or 
turn and run to find a safe 
place on another level or be- 
yond a stout door that you 
hope will hold the monsters 
back. Objects and characters 
shown in the 3-D-perspective 
window are represented with 
a depth and substance that 
suspend disbelief, giving you 
a feeling of truly being there. 

Click on switches to oper- 
ate them, on beds to search 
them, on items in the scene 
for more precise descriptions 
of how they feel, or on Dwar- 
ven, Elven, or other script for 
an instant translation from par- 
ty members who know the lan- 
guage. Exploration is very 
much like walking down a hall- 
way and picking up objects 
to examine them. And when 
you place an object on the 
floor, it stays there until you re- 
turn to retrieve it, 

Darkmoon's engrossing 
plot is revealed in a series of 
character-interaction scenes. 
In each of these scenes, the 
dungeon display is replaced 
by a screenwide graphic of 
the nonplayer character 
who's talking or a prominent 
game feature, such as the tem- 
ple of Darkmoon. 

Characters are awarded ex- 



perience for completing 
quests, finding significant 
items, solving puzzles, and 
making the correct choice 
when given an option. Adven- 
turing players' characters 
speak right up when they 
have the skill to notice some- 
thing important about the im- 
mediate surroundings of the 
party, giving you the feeling 
that you're part of a group of re- 
al people. Characters also 
speak up if the party is asked 
to commit an act contrary to 
their moral alignment with re- 
spect to good, evil, chaos, and 
order, adding more personali- 
ty to the characters. 

Strategic Simulations re- 
sponded to some of the crit- 
icism of the first Eye of the Be- 
holder by adding several new 
features to Darkmoon. For in- 
stance. Darkmoon has six 
user-definable save-games, 
which will be needed, since 
there are several dead-end sit- 
uations you can encounter in 
the game. Also, there's a high- 
er level of player interaction 
and story development that en- 
gages you in the conflict. 

Player interaction is, how- 
ever, still somewhat limited. 
Darkmoon allows for the re- 
cruitment of only six nonplay- 
er characters, but they're very 
interesting and unpredictable, 
giving character recruitment 
some bite. And there's only 
manual combat. 

Darkmoon does have a few 
bugs. Make sure that the par- 
ty has three glowing orbs pri- 
or to passing through the un- 
intentionally one-way crimson 
ring portal in the crimson tow- 
er. Cieric-fighter-mage multi- 
class characters cause the 
game to lock up when area- 
affect spells are thrown at the 
party. The keyboard control 
of movement occasionally is 
unresponsive during a battle, 




which caused my party to be 
killed off several times in the fi- 
nal climactic battle with Dran 
Draggore. Still, these prob- 
lems were only a little annoy- 
ing when compared to the en- 
joyable gameplay that snuck 
up and stole 40 hours of time 
from my life. 

This is one of the best real- 
time, first-person-perspective 
games ever produced. The 
graphics are much sharper 
and more attractive than those 
of previous games; when com- 
bined with the coordinated dig- 
itized sound effects, they pull 
you into the realtime action. 
Eye of the Beholder II: The Leg- 
end of Darkmoon has a rich sto- 
ry line, improved graphics, 
spectacular animation, and a 
satisfying finale. Also, it's a lot 
of fun to play. D 

Circle Reader Service Number 302 



IBM PC and compatibles 
(80286 or faster), 64IIK 
RAM I570K free), 16- 
color EGA or 256-color 
MCGA or VGA, 1.2MB hlgh- 
danslty 5%-lncli or 720K 
double-density 3y2-inch 
floppy drive and hard 
drive with 2.7MB tree 
space; Ad Lib, Sound 
Blaster, and compatible 
sound cards supported— 
$59.95, dye booi(— 
$14.95 

STRATEGIC SIMULATIONS 
Oistrlbuted by 
Electronic Arts 
1450 Fashion Island Blvd. 
San Mateo, CA 94404 
(800) 245-4525 



JULY 1992 COMPUTE 87 



Finally. A ( 




Retlne eecli hols wiw "Plot & P(ay"Are the bunkers 

in unfair positions? Don't wait until your course design is 

compieted to lind out - play the Hole instantly, while 

design is in prooress, and feel out its playability. 



TruB-to-lite balHlight Like real golf, 
club lengtn and loft will determine trajectory and 
distance. A 2 iron will hit long and roll hot, a PW will lly tiigh and 
land soft. And don't ignore l^other Nature. Wind and terrain can alter ball fiight and bounce. 



jolf Game 
Handicap. 



Couipatlbte with Jack Nicklaus 
U/i/ZMetfCoK" Existing courses 





Hear golf's greatest Hits. 

Dioitized sound effects 

add to ttie !otai wealtti of reaiism. 

Ttie unmistakable sound of a forged 

blade cutting tbe air. The perlect 

"ciicK"of a ciub catching the sweet 

spot. It lust doesn't get any better 

than this. 



Jack Nickl 



JaeA:mcWatfs'255(;o/or/nasferiip/ece. Feature rich, with five digitized golfer animations (inciuding ttie Golden Bear 
himself I; authentic tour statistics and up to five rounds of tournament play. Tee off 
_! with friends - or ooraputerizei5 opponents, whose 

)]^; abilities can be altered with the l^layer Editor. 



yj£j:uML 



AVOID SLOW PLAY 






Tbe fastest screen^ 
redraws. Slow play is the 

bane of golf. Signature 
M(/on™solve3 that prob- 
lem with fastest screen 

lirawing speeds of any 

comparable golf gartie. 



1} 



Includes two Nicklaus designed 

courses. Create an unlimlled number of 

layouts with the 256 Color VGA Course 

Designer or tee off on two, ready-lo- 

play Nicklaus signature courses - 

Sherwood Country Club and English Turn. 



The 3l(. 




Signature Edition 








Theall-mn/ 

Jack Nicklaus 

Signature Edition?' Unprecedenieii realism combined m'thunmatclisO 

playability. Or in the language of the links, "dead solid perfect!' But 

what else would you expect fromJack Nicklaus and Accolade? 

To order, visit your ,*— ^— -— ».■ » ■—».■—'» 

favofits software retailer \fMa\t \t\M_ 

orcain-800-245-7744. /"W-VA-^LV^NUL 

The best in entertainment software.™ 

Coming t/iis tail lor the 

Apple" MacintOSll: circle Reader Service Number 1 46 



GAMEPLAY 



Orson Scott Card 



Simplicity and fun are 

the watchwords 

for the early crop ol 

Windows games 

from Microsoft artd 

Symantec. 



A DIFFERENT 
KIND OF GAME 

Let's face it — the Windows en- 
vironment hasn't exactly been 
a gamer's paradise. It's a mat- 
ter of s-p-e-e-d — Windows 
doesn't fiave any! 

Admittedly, on a 486 ma- 
chine with a graphics 
coprocessor and 8MB of 
RAM. Windows can run any 
game fast enough for fun. But 
even on this Ivlother of All Ma- 
chines, which we use for all 
the serious applications (like 
typesetting and playing ivlon- 




key Island 2), it still takes a no- 
ticeable amount of time to re- 
draw the screen and shift from 
one view to another. And 
that's deadly for action and sto- 
ry games. 

But that doesn't mean there 
can't be good games for Win- 
dows. They just have to be 
games of a different kind. M\- 
crosoft itself pointed the way 
with the first Windows Entertain- 
ment Pack (WEP). The con- 
cept was simple and obvious. 
(All good ideas are obvious 
once somebody has thought 
of them.) Develop a bunch of 
small games that are graphical- 
ly simple or that can be 
played in a slow environment, 
package them together, and 
sell the whole caboodle for an 
irresistible price. 

The first Windows Entertain- 
ment Pack must have been fi- 



nancially successful, because 
Microsoft has come back with 
the sequels: Windows Enter- 
tainment Pack Two and Win- 
dows Entertainment Pack 
Three (WEP2 and WEP3). Fur- 
thermore, Symantec has 
joined in with the Symantec 
Game Pack, which has the 
same concept but brings to 
the form a style of its own. 

I can safely say that no 
games have ever been 
played by so many people for 
so many hours in my house. 
Part of the reason is the Win- 
dows environment itself. That 
friendly tabletop has a warm, 
familiar sense 
of clutter that 
reminds every- 
body of sitting 
around the 
kitchen table. 

You gel a 
window full of 
great games, 
and most im- 
tj— "-^ portantly, the 
jR games them- 

selves are like 
Windows— very 
friendly, simple 
to use, kind of 
fun just to hang around with. 
The Symantec games, in fact, 
are downright familiar, since 
they're the games we all 
played as school kids. For in- 
stance, there's a pretty good 
Hangman (you can select cat- 
egories like states or cities or 
computer companies), and 
there's also an excellent ver- 
sion of Mastermind called 
Code Breaker. Memory 
Blocks is an attractive version 
of Concentration. My wife and 
I have found that you can play 
well only once a day, Your 
score gets worse every time 
you play, because you keep 
remembering where objects 
were in the games you played 
previously. 

In the familiar Smart Dots, 
you first draw rows and col- 
umns of dots and then try to 
combine them to make 



squares. The Symantec set in- 
cludes enjoyable versions of 
Jacks and Pickup Sticks, both 
of which will give your mouse 
a serious workout. 

The Microsoft packs have 
the usual mix of solitaire card 
games and tile puzzles, a li- 
censed version of Pipe 
Dream, and even some simple 
action games — golf, skiing, 
and some arcade-style 
games like the one where you 
maneuver an ever-growing 
snake through a maze and a 
cat-and-mouse chase-and- 
strategy game. Every one of 
them is fun, and some of them 
are brilliant. FreeCell, for exam- 
ple, is simply the best single 
solitaire game I've ever 
played. It would be a pain to 
p lay with real ca rds, but the p ro- 
grammers have made the 
card handling smooth and 
easy. These entertainment 
packages prove that there's 
room in the world for games 
that don't give you frantic dead- 
lines and that don't take place 
in a kill-or-be-killed world. 

Oh, there are problems 
here and there. Most of us 
have pretty much given up on 
Pipe Dream; at the higher lev- 
els, the game occasionally 
gives you screens that can't 
be won because the starting 
or finishing pipe unit is block- 
ed by an immovable obstacle. 
And the word game WordZap 
(kind of a high-tech Boggle) is 
marred by a second-rate dic- 
tionary: It refuses to allow 
three- and four-letter words 
that every Scrabble player 
knows. It's frustrating to lose to 
the computer because it 
doesn't know that fey and fay 
are words, for instance. 
Nothing is perfect, but I want 
to emphasize that the glitches 
here are few and far between, 
Until you can lay your hands 
on a fast 486 with a graphics 
accelerator to make Windows 
handle real animation, these 
games are worth opening the 
window to see. □ 



90 COMPUTE JULY 1992 



E X P 



T A L 




'X Jl.\ 



he Crisis ^ 

Giant insee^ffl^ creatures are 
.realenJng tKjI'survival of our planet, 
first they nuked us from space. Now 
hey're reproducing inside living humans. 



Youn 



nental Space Fighter (codename: 
!S). Our first world government, 
,jf Earth (F.O.E.) developed it to fight 
enemy.' Now they're looking for 
neone.to fly it ™ in combat. 



A Fighter Pilot's Dream 

it's up to you to avenge Earth. You'll 

fly the MANTIS, a high-tech wonder 

armed with futuristic firepower. 





The Sirians aren't your run-of-the-mill insect 

aliens, individually, they're powerless pests, 

but together they form .a rm|J^I collective 

group mind capable of adjjmHrtechnoloqy 

that can oblitalWl^e human r 




State Of the Art 3-D 

ANTIS in thrilling, realistic 3-D 

lant graphics, cinematic digitized 

lents, chilling sound effects, and a 

.1 rriusical score add to the adventure. 



aving the planet from destruction is no smal 

;hore. The Sirians are returning to finish what 

they began. Are you up to the challenge? 



Marketed by MicroPr 
180 Lakefront Drive'; 

For Aniici.i IBM PC>Tandy compntiWes For [he latest infofHIBbn on releast dates jind 
arailabilities. calfParaoon Customef Seiv(eBal412-838- 1 ITSiSlra toSjWiEST.v/fiektlays. 



ST-* 



iW^j;*-- 



Coming Soon: MegaTmvellerSand Spellbound: Challenge of the Five Realms 





Get Ready 



iiTl 



Multimedia 

ARTICLE 
BY GREGG KEIZER 

WHAT IS THIS THING CALLED 

MULTIMEDIA? 

AND WHAT WILL IT DO FOR 

ENTERTAINMENT? 




f^-^^Mi$;si$0:i.f^j^:^ 
















>'^ 







^m""'-^ 











Multimedia gets tossed around 
like a chip of ice in tine Nortti 
Atlantic, bandied about by 
PR drones who know it on- 
ly as a hot button that's supposed to 
make entertainment-software consum- 
ers salivate. But don't be intimidated: 
you already know multimedia. 

If you're playing PC games thai 
have been produced in the last cou- 
ple of years, they're probably full of 
multimedia: still images, animated 
graphics, sound effects, sweeping mu- 
sical scores, even human-sounding 
speech. When you use multimedia as 
an adjective today, though, you 
mean all that and a little more. The 
term refers to an integrated presenta- 
tion that includes massive numbers of 
images, herky-jerky video clips, soar- 



ing stereophonic music, and plenty of 
digitized speech, tvlore often than not. 
the presentation comes on a compact 
disc, not a floppy. 

In fact, MPC (IVIultimedia Personal 
Computer), the single established mul- 
timedia hardware/software standard, 
relies on the compact disc, among oth- 
er requirements. So while muilimedia 
may be a burning buzzword, it's real- 
ly nothing more than another step 
down the same entertainment road 
you've been traveling all along. 

Still, you're probably not prepared 
for the multimedia game titles that 
will straggle onto the shelves this 
year. To keep up with the technolog- 
ical times, you need So beef up your 
home PC. Assuming you have a 
386SX or 386 equipped with 2IV1B- 



4MB of RAM, VGA or Super VGA, and 
a hard disk in the 40MB-80MB range, 
you'il spend $600-$1,200 to make it 
multimedia-ready. 

The most expensive add-on is a CD- 
ROM drive. Multimedia of all kinds, 
games included, needs the storage 
space that only a compact disc — with 
more than 600MB — provides. 

Once priced at stratospheric levels, 
CD-ROM drives now are much more af- 
fordable. One of the lowest-priced is 
Tandy's CDR-1000, a $400 internal 
drive that's fairly easy to install yourself, 
An external drive is a possibility, too, if 
your PC doesn't have an empty drive 
bay or if you don't mind losing a bit of 
desktop real estate. A good choice 
here is the Sony Laser Library, a drive- 
and-software combination that features 
an external Sony CD-ROM drive and 
six CD-ROM titles; the Laser Library typ- 
ically costs around S600. 

As you look for a CD-ROM drive, re- 
member that many (but not all) of 
1992's multimedia entertainment pro- 
grams will sport the MPC logo. Only 
MFC-compatible drives are guaran- 
teed to play MPC-labeled software. 
The Tandy CDR-1000 meets MPC 
specs, for example, while the Sony 
CDU-535 included in the Laser Library 
doesn't (though the Sony CDU-541 in- 
ternal drive is MPC-ready). 

An MPC CD-ROM drive will run MPC 
and non-MPC multimedia CD titles, 
while a non-MPC CD-ROM drive re- 
stricts you to DOS multimedia CDs. 
While the future of MPC isn't guaran- 
teed, Microsoft's interest and backing 
can't be ignored. Whether MPC suc- 
ceeds or fails is a matter that will be de- 
cided by PC users as a whole, but by 
sticking with MPC-compatible compo- 
nents, you're covering all bets. If MPC 
takes off, you're ready. !f it doesn't, 
your PC will still be able to run DOS 
CD multimedia titles. 

Final verdict? The smart move is to 
get an MPC-compatible CD-ROM 
drive for your computer. 

Sound On! 

Your second major multimedia addition 
is a sound card. Something has to 
pump out the stereo sound effects, mu- 
sical scores, and voice-overs. 

If your PC sounds off with an Ad Lib 
audio board, one of the two de facto 
standards in PC audio, yank it out. It 
just can't carry the tunes and speech 
that developers are cramming on com- 
pact disc-based multimedia games. If 
your system includes a Sound Blaster 
board, the other current standard, 
you're safe — for now, 

What if you haven't made the move 
to audio or you settled for a pre-Gold 
Ad Lib? Then you can choose from a va- 

94 COMPUTE JULY 1992 



riety of audio cards, including Sound 
Blaster Pro, Ad Lib Gold 1000, and the 
new 16-bit Media Vision Pro AudioSpec- 
trum and Ad Lib Gold 2000 boards. 

All are more expensive than previ- 
ous-generation cards, but as a rule, 
they are easier to install, they sound bet- 
ter, and they include more features. All 
four meet MPC specifications, in that 
they're capable of producing digitized 
speech and can be connected to MIDI 
equipment (the letter's for creating mul- 
timedia presentations of yourown, not 
for gameplay). 

Only two of these boards offer 16- 
bit sound: the Media Vision and the Ad 
Lib Gold 2000 cards. You can't get 16- 
bit sound from any of the current up- 
grade kits, The next jump in PC audio 
will be 16-bit sound, so while all the 
cards satisfy current multimedia 
needs, only two are ready for the future 
of multimedia. The others will do for the 
next couple of years, though, as pub- 
lishers stretch to take advantage of 
their features. Keep this in mind as you 
decide how much to spend for sound 
on your multimedia system. 

One thing you can safely buy is a 
pair of self-amplified speakers to put be- 
side your PC. Headpfiones handle mul- 
timedia sound, of course — every audio 



board includes a headphone jack — 
but you'll find the experience much 
more comfortable and natural when 
the roar of dragons and the wail of the 
wounded come out of larger speakers. 
After all, you don't watch television 
with headphones on, do you? 

Self-amplified speakers — some 
made expressly for PCs, some not — 
are available from a variety of sources. 
Both Radio Shack and Bose market 
excellent powered speaker systems. 

Put Card A in Slot B 

The quickest way to move up to multi- 
media entertainment is with an up- 
grade kit. Several companies sell 
these all-in-one collections of CD-ROM 
drive, interface card, audio board, con- 
necting cables, and Microsoft Win- 
dows 3.1 with multimedia functionality. 
Ail you add is your home PC. 

The adventurous will strike out on 
their own and patch together a multime- 
dia game-playing machine by grabbing 
a CD-ROM drive here and a sound 
card there. That much work isn't worth it 
for most. Nor is it a big money saver. 

The fact is that a package like Me- 
dia Vision's Multimedia PC Upgrade Kit 
is hard to turn down. Although it lists at 
nearly $1,000, most mail-order dealers 



PRODUCT INFORMATION 


Ad Lib Gold 1000 


BattleChess MPC 


$299.95 


$79.95 


Ad Lib Gold 2000 


Interplay 


$399,95 


3710 S. Sysan, Ste. 100 


AdLib 


Santa Ana, CA 92704 


220 Grande-Atle E, Ste. 850 


(800) 969-4263 


Quebec City PQ 




Canada G1R2J1 


Multimedia PC Upgrade Kit 


(800) 463-2686 


$995,00 




Pro AudioSpectrum 


Whore in the World Is Carmen 


$389.00 


Sandiego?, Deluxe CD-ROM 


Media Vision 


$89,95 


47221 Fremont Blvd. 


Broderbund 


Fremont, CA 94538 


500 Redwood Blvd. 


(800) 845-5870 


Novate, CA 94948-6162 




(800) 521-6263 


King's Quest V-CD 




$69.95 


CompuAdd Multimedia Upgrade Kit 


Sierra On-Line 


$1,069.00 (internal CD-ROM drive) 


P.O. Box 485 


$1,295.00 (external CD-ROM drive) 


Coarsegold, CA 93614 


$425.00 (kit without CD-ROM drive) 


(800) 326-6654 


CompuAdd 




12303 Technofogy Blvd. 


Sony Laser Library 


Austin, TX 78727 


$699,95 


(800)627-1967 


Sony 




655 River Oaks Pkwy. 


Sound Blaster Multimedia Upgrade Kit 


San Jose, C A 95134 


S849.95 (internal CD-ROM drive) 


(800) 222-0878 


$949.95 (external CD-ROM drive) 




Sound Blaster Pro 


CDR-1000 CD-ROM Drive 


$299.95 


$399.95 


Creative Labs 


Tandy 


1901 McCarthy Blvd. 


700 One Tandy Center 


Miipitas, CA 95035 


Ft. Worth. TX 76102 


(408) 428-6600 


(817)390-3011 



JiiTROM THE SMOKING RUINS OF 



^H£^W 



OR 




./with the men and machines of W.W.II combat in the P^fic, 
p against enemy Bg^ters and aces, you'll intercept bombers, diye- 
bomb enemy carriers, launch ground attacks to cripple the enemjffir- 
ises and experience the terror and exhilaration of carrier landingS 



g! highot-rankir^ ace, Richard Bong. ;i?ii^, 

hfer30 meticulously researched vintage aircraft, ■"'ll^^^HI^^ Zero, the F4U 
Corsair, the P-38 Lightning, the F6F Hellcat, the P-4fTiHSolt, the 
SBD-3 Dauntless Dive Bomber, the B5N Kate Toipedo Bomber, and many more. 

* Fly for cither Ajticrica or Japan, ctperietldng die sights and s oimdi of ai t combat in the 
Pacific: Carrier deck landings and take-ofis, torpedo dive bon|^^^^air explosions and 
billowing clouds of smoke. i ^^B^H 

Play a quick single mission or enlist for die n^our between 

* A powcifiil Mission RccDtdcr lets you save an en« ' ' ' 
into the simulation at any point to begin playing i 



\ 



I 
SIMULATION . 





A magnificent 240 page manual, complete with a d 
photos, war maps, pilot profiles, air combat ta™" 
aiiciaft illustrations. 



(ewofffiewar, 
■ 25 color pages of 



"The Benchmark if (lie '90'sfor Fligfit Shnuktion. " 
SImy Addams, Smulatiom!' Magazine 

, "Aces of the Pacific is to Red Baron what die Corsair 
has to the Fokker Tri-Plam" 
"" T Gaming World 






ofDyiliiiniit. IfK.. Cf'isiiiupisEcrdilcradcmariLnfDyRamlx. \yv:. \m2. All richl' 



For ordering infomution. visit your favorite sothvarc store or call Sierra On-Line at I -800-326-66 >4. Outside the U.S., tall 209-683-4468. 

Circle Reader Service Number 224 



S00334 



"A SUPERHERO TO COLLECT" 




— N.Y. Times 

"...make way for 
Lance Stone, future 
hero of electronic pop 
literature." 

—Marketing Computefs 

"Itscliff-hianger 



\ \ "N ending leaves you 



itching for more." 

—Business Week 



PC ComiK Inc. 

400 Williamson Way 

Ashland, OR 97520 

(800) 944-0181 

$Z0 plus Shipping 

(shipping Si U.5 , 55 foreign) 

IBM/VCJA/640K 



Lance Stone and hyperComln 
are trademarK5 of PC Comix Inc. 



Circle Reader Service Number 196 



New from COMPUTE 



•nicOfficiuKniidcTo 
Sid Meier's 

CIVILIZATION 



r 



Here's the official guide to the 
latest simulation from best- 
selling game designer, Sid 
Meier. Author Keith Ferrell has 
worked closely with Sid Meier 
and includes insider information, 
hints, strategies, and back- 
ground information that enhanc- 
es and complements the simula- 
tion. This is the most readable, 
information-packed guide to C/V- 
ilization. Ferrell is editorial direc- 
tor of COMPUTE magazine and 
editor of OMNI magazine. He is 
the author of scores of maga- 
zine articles and the author of 
several books, including the re- 
cently released Big Book of PC 
Sports. 

To order your copy send $14.95 plus 
$2 shipping and handling U.S. ($4 

Canada, $6 other) to COMPUTE 

Books, c/o CCC, 2500 McClellan Ave., Pennsauken, NJ 08109. (Residents of NC, 
N J, and NY please add appropriate sales tax; Canadian orders add 7% Goods and 
Services Tax.) 

All orders must be paid In U.S. funds drawn on a U.S. bank. Orders will be shipped via UPS Ground Service. 
Offer good while supplies last. 



Kt-iihFerrdl 




TheAiil!umuli>c(pUi(Jf 



sell it for around $750. Included in the 
Upgrade Kit are a Sony CDU-541 exter- 
nal CD-ROM drive, a Pro AudioSpec- 
trum sound card that doubles as the 
SCSI interface card, Windows with Mul- 
timedia Extensions, and two CD titles. 
Fill an empty slot with the Pro Audio- 
Spectrum and an empty drive bay 
with the CDU-541, and inside an hour, 
your PC's ready to play CD games. 

Other companies promise similar 
feats of computer transformation. Com- 
puAdd, Creative Labs (Sound Blaster), 
Tandy, and Video Seven are four 
more sources for multimedia upgrade 
kits. Each relies on its own pairing of 
sound board and CD-ROM drive, but 
in the end, any one of them makes 
your PC a multimedia game machine. 

That's a Lot of Quarters, Pal 

For all the ease with which you can 
turn your current PC into a multimedia 
game player, though, the biggest ques- 
tion still hasn't been asked. 

Is the price you pay for the move to 
multimedia worth it? After all, that 
much money translates into 15-20 top- 
priced PC games or a lot of quarters 
down at the mall arcade, 

Whether the price is a bargain de- 
pends on how badly you want to lead 
the charge into multimedia games. 

It's unlikely that you'll see more than 
a couple of dozen CD and/or MPC 
games through the end of 1992. A 
scant few have made it out developers' 
doors so far — BattleChess, Where in 
the World is Carmen Sandiego?, and 
King's Quest V, for starters — and the 
trickle won't turn into a flood anytime 
soon. And PCs won't even be the only 
place you can play CD games. Video- 
game decks from Sega and Nintendo 
will get CD capability either late this 
year or early next. 

On the positive side, remember that 
a multimedia computer can do more 
than play games. It'll run any CD title, 
whether a reference work for the 
home office or an educational disc for 
the kids. And it'll keep working hard 
with word processors, page-layout soft- 
ware, spreadsheets, and databases. 

The bottom line for multimedia enter- 
tainment is fuzzy If you want to stay 
state-of-the-art and can't bear to miss 
even the beginning of the most amaz- 
ing home entertainment since VGA col- 
or met PC games, go multimedia now. 
If you can bide your time, do so; when 
an irresistible game comes along, you 
can upgrade quickly and easily. 

Clearly, computers are headed for a 
more integrated way of dealing with 
sound, speech, and moving images. 
Whether that trend makes its way into 
your house depends on hov,/ important 
games are to you and your family D 



96 COMPUTE JULY 1992 



64/128 VIEW 



Mad Man Software is a new company with 

a new adventure game for the 64. Its average 

playing time is between 200 and 400 hours. 

Tom Netsel 



The rat looked as big as 
a Volkswagen, and it 
was charging straight at 
our hero. Outrunning 
such a creature was impos- 
sible. His only chance was 
to stand and fight, a pitifully 
small sword his only weap- 
on. He drew it and took a 
swing at the rampaging ro- 
dent. Would the rat engulf 
him, or would his puny blow 
strike home? 

As we held our breaths 
awaiting the outcome, it 
took a minute before we re- 
alized that nothing had hap- 
pened. The rat was still 
there, our hero was stil 
there, but the screen had fro- 
zen. Our first encounter with 
the game's first monster, 
and the program locked up. 
This was one of those embar- 
rassing moments that can oc- 
cur when a software repre- 
sentative demonstrates his 
company's latest product. 

Reboot. Try again. Same 
thing. Groan! I was feeling 
sorry for Gene Barker. He's 
a recent graduate from the 
Colorado School of f\/lines 
who'd flown to North Caroli- 
na from Colorado to show 
the Gazette staff Messiah 111: 
Nemisis, an adventure 
game for the 64 that he's 
been developing for almost 
six years. Now, when the 
game's lead character aims 
his first blow at the very first 
monster, years of program- 
ming grind to a halt. 

Wait a minute! This 128 
has a defective SID chip, 
and the program relies on 
one of the computer's voic- 
es to generate random num- 
bers to heip decide a bat- 
tle's outcome. The pro- 
gram's in a loop, waiting for 
a random number to ap- 
pear, and that chip is as si- 
lent as Harpo Marx! We 



could be here until Godzilla 
comes home. Let's go 
down the hall and try anoth- 
er machine. 

As I said, when someone 
comes all this way to demon- 
strate a major new release 
for the 64, you want things 
to go well, After all, there's 
not exactly a flood of new ti- 
tles sweeping that market 
these days. In fact, it would 
take a madman to start a 
new company aimed at de- 
veloping software for that vet- 
eran market. And that's just 
what Barker and ten associ- 
ates have done, Their com- 
pany is called Mad Man Soft- 
ware (7610 West 5th Ave- 
nue, Suite 200, Lakewood, 
Colorado). For the past 
year, they've been polishing 
Barker's game, and 
Messiah III should be ready 
by this fall or Christmas. 

Messiah III is no light- 
weight arcade adventure, 
as we saw when we ran it 
on another machine. We 
were treated to a richly de- 
tailed adventure game 
that's the first of a six-game 
saga. Messiah 111, which 
should sell for around $60, 
consists of more than one 
megabyte of code. That's 
six disk sides. Disk access 
times have been reduced, 
however, so that the longest 
load should take no more 
than 12 seconds. 

While we await the final 
version for review. Barker esti- 
mates the average playing 
time will take between 200 
and 400 hours. When many 
new games are measured 
in megabytes. Barker 
doesn't feel the 64's memo- 
ry constraints have placed 
limits on his creativity. "It's 
the game's design which dic- 
tates its power," he says, 
"not the machine." D 



GAZETTE 

64/128 VIEW 


G-1 


Anybody who'd start a new company based 


on a new 


adventure game for the 64 must be a madman, but 


that's just what Gene Barker and friends have done. 


By Tom Netsel. 






FEEDBACK 


M-2 


Questions and comments from our readers. 




THE SMALLER, THE BETTER 


G-4 


For large storage capacity in a small package, 


check out the 1581. It's the great big drive 




in the little beige box. 




By George Gunn. 




REVIEWS 


G-1 2 


Chip's Challenge, Perfect Print, Predator 2. 




BEGINNER BASIC 


G-18 


Joystick ports usually handle input devices, 


but 


here's a way to reverse the data flow. 




By Larry Cotton. 




MACHINE LANGUAGE 


G-20 


The stack works so well by itself that many 




programmers simply ignore it. 




By Jim Butterfield. 




GEOS 


G-22 


Check out deskTop alternatives. 




By Steve '^Zander Ark. 




DIVERSIONS 


G-24 


Can multimedia be a springboard to immortality? 


By Fred D'lgnazio. 




PROGRAMS 




Pop-Up 


G-25 


Mimic 128 


G-28 


SpeedPurge 


G-29 


Alphabetizer 


G-30 


Duplicate 1541 


G-31 


Railroad Solitaire 


G-32 


128 Graphic Dump 


G-34 


Quiz WIz 


G-35 


MLX 


6-38 



JULY 1992 COMPUTE G-1 



FEEDBACK 



Questions and 

answeis about time, 

word processors, 

modems, programming 

languayes, and MIDI 



INPUT Time 

Is there a way to change the 
value of Tl$ by using an IN- 
PUT statement from within a 
BASIC program? 

KARL HOSEMANN 
DENVER. CO 

Try the following line in your 
program. It should do the 
trick nicely. 

10 INPUT "NEW TIME"; Tl$ 

When the program runs and 
you see the INPUT prompt, en- 
ter your response with six dig- 
its in an HHMMSS format HH 
equals hours, MM equals min- 
utes, and SS equals seconds. 
For example, 123456 will set 
Tl$ to read 12:34:56. If you en- 
ter more or fewer digits, you 'I! 
get an ILLEGAL QUANTITY 
message. If the number is 
greater than 23:59:59, the 
clock resets to 00:00:00. 

Bug-Swatter 

The ending address of File 
Lord (fvlay 1992) is incorrect. 
The correct address is 14C0. 
This affects fvlLX only and not 
the File Lord program. We pre- 
pared the listing after the doc- 
umentation, and it was then 
that we noticed how long the 
program was. To make it eas- 
ier to type in, we compressed 
the program with Mega- 
Squeeze but neglected to 
change the ending address. 
The compression program 
may have affected the way 
the program starts. If you 
type RUN and get a READY 
message, simply type RUN 
again, and File Lord should 
start. The program on Ga- 
zette Diskv/asn'l affected. 

SO-Column Word Processor 

Is there a word processor for 
the 64 that has a true 80-cqI- 
umn screen? I am looking for 
one that's like the 128 or \BWl. 
not a 40-column screen such 
as GEOS, which scrolls to re- 
veal 80 columns. I am not look- 



ing for one that simply has a 
preview screen either, Is 
there one that exists with this 
feature? 

JON PERSINGER 
INDIANAPOLIS. IN 

You might try Script 64, pub- 
lished by RIchvale Telecommu- 
nications of Canada. To the 
best of my knowledge, howev- 
er, that company is no longer 
in business. You might locate 
a used copy of the program 
for about $9 at Bare Bones 
Software. 940 4th Avenue, 
Suite 222. Huntington, West 
Virginia 25701, (800) 638- 
1 123. Call or write for a free 
catalogue of used 64 and 
128 software. They also carry 
Amiga products. Supplies are 
limited, so check with the com- 
pany before ordering. 

Modem Woes 

I have a 64 with an Aprotek 
12C modem used as a Volks 
6480. I would like to play mo- 
dem games with a friend, but 
I need the originate and an- 
swer codes that will corre- 
spond with my friend's Com- 
modore 1670 modem. I can't 
find this information in the man- 
ual. Can you supply me with 
these codes? 

MARTIN BOUTIN 
LONGUEUIL, PQ 
CANADA 

Your modem, which can be 
used as a Volks 6480. is no 
longer in production, but you 
should have no problem us- 
ing it to connect with your 
friend. It requires no special 
originate or answer codes or 
settings. It's Hayes compati- 
ble in that it supports automat- 
ic answering (ATA) and auto- 
matic diaiing (ATDT) com- 
mands, just as your friend's 
1670 does. You should be 
able to contact each other 
just as easily as you can con- 
nect with a local BBS. 

Check the terminal or 
game software you're using 



for requirements specific to 
that program. It may require 
manual dialing or answering. 
Also check the echo or du- 
plex modes to make sure you 
both can see what each of 
you is typing. If you still think 
the modem is at fault, call 
Aprotek's service department 
at (503) 582-2118 from 8:00 
a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Pacific time 
on weekdays. 

Pascal Wanted 

I am currently taking a 
course in Pascal at high 
school, using Turbo Pascal 
on a fvlacintosh. I have a 64 
at home, and I would like to 
use Pascal with it. Is there 
such a compiler and where 
can I obtain it? 

MIKE SMITH 
CRYSTAL. MM 

Contact Abacus, 5370 52nd 
Street SE. Grand Rapids. Mich- 
igan; (800) 451-4319, and 
ask about Super Pascal 64 
($19.95). It implements the 
full Jensen & WIrth compiler 
plus extensions for graphics. 
It has a complete source file 
editor, a full assembler, and a 
utility package. 

MIDI Info 

I am interested in music and 
would like to get into MIDI. Is 
there a MIDI system available 
for the 64? 

EDNA WILLIAMS 
BRIDGEPORT CT 

Contact Dr. T's Music Soft- 
ware, 100 Crescent Road, 
Needham, Massachusetts 
02194; (617) 455-1454, and 
ask for its free catalog of 
MIDI hardware and software. 
Dr. T offers a 64 MIDI starter 
pack that includes its Key- 
board Controlled Sequencer, 
a MIDI interface, and two 
MIDI cables for $180. A ver- 
sion for the 128 retails for 
$275. You'll have to supply 
your own MIDI keyboard or 
other MIDI instrument. D 



G-2 COMPUTE JULY 1992 



;SSSItDWBr«*:sK»A»«*S«. 



Amiga 500 Computer 

Basic Package 

95 



'299 



Plus 3 Great value Packages! 

•Software Bundle r1 
.TV Adopter 

S36d 35 
TotQlotRegPrlce . ^,,5 




:rororeS:u.ov.tic. 

• TV Adapter 

•TENEX 500 MemoiY Exponsion 

Totol at Reg. Price ,5 

L.WT.NEX package Wee^^^^ J ^^,^, 



•Amiga 1054S Stereo Monrto, 

•^nftv/are Bundle *^ 
•foZare Bundle «&Jov.c^ 
•TENEX 500 Memorv Expansion 

5739.75 
Totol at Reg, Price ,^,„ 

L»w^'^«^°='TouTateS^MMcr«l 



r 



Commodore-Ready Printer 

from Star 

At An Incredible Pricel 



$ 



(95 






NX-IOOOC. 

s^pi°ed"droft1.M'^^^'''^c'^ ^* '^P^ °"^ high- 
speed draft af ]4A cps, Features the new 

frn^r P°'^9 '^"^*'°" °nd convenient 
ton^ ^T' '=°"4™'=- '"C'^des four buTnn 
Co,^^oH°^^' ^° fypestvles. This is the 
Commodore-ready version of the NX-imn 
Just plug it in ond start printing-no addT 
ttonol interfaces or cables requ/red 

NX.1000CPri„.„ '75'o6r"'S|°5 

^bb„„(NX..OOOC) 7547'.''"-''']5";5 
Du5. cover 77785 $8:95 




'■ff^JSfM 



Commodore 64 
Computer 

Only 

$14995 



OTHER STAR PRINTERS 



NX- 100 1 Multi-Font 
NX-2420 Rainbow 
NX- 1020 Rainbow 
LaserPrinter 4 



90895 Si 39.95 

A51047 $284.95 

A51027 SI 79,95 

A57934 S799.00 




Don't miss out on the lov*/est prices on 
the Anniga 500, plus a full line of 
Commodore anid Amiga hardware, 
software, and accessories. 
Coil today to receive your FREE 
cotalog with the greatest prices on the 
most popular hardware and software! 



Commodore 154 1 // 
Disk Drive 

Only 

$16995 






Computer Express 



56800 Magnetic Drive : . : 
Misha w3ka,lH 4B545 
(2i9)^9-705l\ FAX (219)259-0300 
We gladly accept mail orders! 
Circle Reader Service Number 170 

(P8p0-77Q-6781j 



Shippirrg, Handling, Insurance 


Order Amounl 


Charge 


less than $19.99 


S4.95 


S20.00-S39.99 


$5.95 


S40.00-S74.99 


$6.95 


S75.0O-S99.99 


$7.95 


8100,00-3149.99 


$9.95 


S15O-00-S2 99.99 


S10.95 


S30O.0O-S4 99,00 


S12.95 


S500.00-S6 99.99 


SI 9.95 


S700.00-S999.9g 


S27.95 


SlOOO&Over 


2.8% of Order 



^«S*. 



COMMODORE 64 and COr/rulODORE 1 28 are registered Irademarks of Commodore Eleclronics, Lid. AMIGA is a regtslered trademart< o( CommtxJore Amiga Inc.. NOTE; Due to publishing : 
lead trmes product prices and specifications are subject !o change wiMioul nolice. ■APO, FPO. AK. HI, CN. VI, GU, and (oreign orders are subject to additsonal shipping charges. 



V V*. 



i .-iv. .-.:H 







IK SMAUER,IHE 




BETTER 



FOR GREATER STORAGE CAPACITY IN A 

SMALLER PACKAGE, THE 1581 IS 

THE BIG DRIVE IN THE LITTLE BEIGE BOX. 

BY GEORGE GUNN 



The 1581 drive is a great piece of 
hardware for anyone who owris 
a 64 or 128, and it's also compat- 
ible with Plus/4, Commodore 16, 
and VIC 20. The 1581 is smaller than ei- 
ther the 1541 or 1571, yet it stores 
much more data on its disks. The 
1581 's 3y2-fnch disk holds nearly a 
megabyte of information (808,960 
bytes). After formatting, 3,160 blocks 
are available to the user, with 40 
blocks reserved for the disk's main di- 
rectory On a 1541, this would be equiv- 
alent to 4% floppies, each with 664 
available blocl<s! 

Having all this space makes it pos- 
sible to store a huge number of files on 
one disk, but the directory scrolls off 
the screen if you have more than 22 
files. This can make file management 
particularly difficult. 

For this reason, the 1581 has a fea- 
ture known as partitions. A partition is 
a space on a disk which the user sets 
aside for special use. For all intents 
and purposes, each partition is seen 
by the computer as a separate disk. 
Within the limits of certain parameters, 
you can create numerous partitions on 
each disk, with each partition contain- 
ing whatever files you wish. Each par- 
tition can also have its own directory. 
You can even store files with the same 
filename on the same disk, because 
the computer thinks each partition is a 
separate disk drive. 

Logical Disk Organization 

When creating partitions, it's helpful to 
remember the 1581 's logical dist< organ- 
ization. Although each 1581 disk is 
double-sided, the computer sees it as 
single-sided, with 80 tracks per disk 
(numbered 1-80) and 40 sectors (or 
blocks) per track (numbered 0-39). 

It might be helpful to think of a for- 
matted disk as consisting of a series of 
concentric circles. Each circle is a 
track, and each track is divided into sev- 
eral sectors. 

Each partition must consist of one or 
more complete tracks; thus, a partition 
must be a multiple of 40 sectors in 
length and must begin on sector of a 
given track. Remember that track 40 is 
reserved for the disk's main directory 
so tracits 1-39 are available for partition- 
ing, as are tracks 41-80, A partition 
may not include or pass over track 40. 

Creating Partitions 

The commands for creating partitions 
described in the 1581 user's guide are 
unwieldy and difficult to understand. Of 
greater help is the Partition Aid pro- 
gram on the demo disk that's supplied 
with the drive. Through a series of 
screens and prompts, this program 
asks for the partition name, beginning 

G-6 COMPUTE JULY 1992 



track and sector, and total number of 
blocks you want in the partition. Sup- 
pose you want to create a partition 
called Arcade Games and set aside 
600 blocks for it. After loading and run- 
ning Partition Aid on the demo disk, 
you'd be presented with a screen that 
lists the following options. 

1. SHOW PARTITIONS 

2. CREATE PARTITIONS 

3. DIRECTORY 

4. CHANGE UNIT 

5. QUIT 

Since we don't have any partitions at 
this time, you'd skip the first choice. 
Choosing option 2 would take you to 
the next screen called Create a Parti- 
tion. Here you'd see the following in- 
structions on your screen. 



MODIFYING SPEEDSCRIPT 

Most people set their 1541 or 1571 as 
drive 8 and designate the 1581 as drive 
9. If you use SpeedScript, whicti normal- 
ly uses drive 8, there was formerly no 
easy way to save your files to drive 9 and 
use the 158 1 as the data storage device. 
Now there's a way to alter the pro- 
gram to access drive 9 instead. This wili 
let you load SpeedScript from a 1541 or 
1571 and save data to the 1581. Of 
course, since SpeedScript is fairly 
small, you can save this modified version 
to the 1581 and direct all of its disk com- 
mands to drive 9. To accomplish this, 
load a copy of SpeedScript into memory, 
but don't run it. Then enter the following 
two lines below in immediate mode. 

POKE 4843,9: POKE 4908,9: POKE 5274,9: 
POKE 5873,9: POKE 5957,9 
POKE 6367,9: POKE 6883,9: POKE 7003,9: 
POKE 7073,9 

Then save the modified program to 
disk using a unique filename, such as 
SPEEDSCRIPT9. All disk commands will 
now access device number 9. You won't 
be able to switch at will between drive 8 
and drive 9 from within SpeedScript, but 
you can choose to work from wtiichever 
version of SpeedScript you wish. If you 
try to alter such a program, however, be 
sure you don't alter your only copy of It. 
Make a backup copy first. 

Of course, you must set the switches 
on the back of your 1581 to the proper 
combination. If both of your drives are 
set to the same device number, your sys- 
tem will lock up. 

To set the drive number, turn off your 
1581 's power and look at the drive from 
the rear. To set it for drive 8, push both 
switches to ttie up position. To set it for 
drive 9. pull the left switch down and 
push the right switch up. To set the 1581 
to drive 10, set the left switch up and the 
right one down. Pull both switches to the 
down position to set it for drive 11. 



TO CREATE A SUBDIRECTORY YOUR 
PARTITION IVlUST 

(1) START ON SECTOR 

(2) BE AT LEAST 120 BLOCKS 

(3) BE A MULTIPLE OF 40 BLOCKS 

At the prompt Enter a partition name, 
you would enter Arcade games. 

Next, you're prompted for the begin- 
ning track. Since track 40 is reserved 
for the disk's directory, it may not be 
used. The partition may begin on any 
other track on the disk. This prompt ap- 
pears onscreen as follows. 

FIRST TRACK (1-39 or 41-80) 
? 

We'll begin this partition on the first 
track of the disk, so we should enter 
the number 1. Next, you're prompted 
for the first sector. 

FIRST SECTOR (0-39) 
? 

For practically all purposes this would 
be 0, so enter at the prompt. 

Finally you're prompted for the num- 
ber of blocks you want in the partition. 
This must be a minimum of 120 and a 
multiple of 40. 

NUfVlBER OF BLOCKS IN PARTITION 

7 

We're making a partition of 600 blocks 
(which, by the way, covers 15 tracks 
since 600/40=15), so at this prompt we 
enter the number 600. 

After this iast prompt, all the neces- 
sary information has been gathered, 
and we're taken to a third screen, bear- 
ing the title Create a Partition. At the 
top of the screen we see the following 
message. 



CREATING PARTITION: 
GAMES STATUS: OK 



ARCADE 



Next, we're asked if we want to make 
a subdirectory for this partition. For 
most uses, you'll need a subdirectory, 
so at the prompt type Yes. 

This brings up another prompt ask- 
ing for a directory name. Here you 
should type the Partition Name Arcade 
games. 

Finally we are prompted for the famil- 
iar two-character alphanumeric ID, 
well known to users of CBM BASIC. 
Let's number this partition 01. 

From this prompt, the drive checks 
its status and tells us to press a key to 
continue. 

We're then returned to the opening 
screen, where we may exit by pressing 
number 5. At this point we have 
placed a partition of 600 blocks on 



RIO 800-782-9110 



ORDERS 
ONLY 



COMPUTERS 



MON-SAT 8AM-6PM PACIFIC TIME 



OUST SERVICEATECH SUPPORT 
AUTOMATIC VOICE/FAX SWITCH 

702-454-7700 

TUE-SAT 1 PM-5PM PACIFIC TIME 



VIDEOFOX VIDEO DIGITIZER 



The Tool For Creative Video Buffs 

Generate video titles, opening credits, window 
advertising, animation or other small trick movies 

■ All of these exciting effects are are easy and fun for you to do witfi 
our new Videofox software 

■ Provides 18 special effects such as scrolling, combing, winshield 
wiper and spiral mixing 

■ Mix text, graphics and effecs to produce hundreds of combinations 

■ Independent adjustment of foreground and background colors 

■ Page flipping in real time for perfect animation sequences 



ONLY $59.95 




■ Digitize black and white or color pictures 

■ Digitize any video source including VCR 

■ Digitize either4, 7 or 13 level grey levels 

■ Menu controled picture brightnes 

■ Includes three independent software programs 
lor total control and editine of digitized images: 
DIGISON ~ DIGIFOX - DIGIMULTI 

■ Free color fitters included for digitizing color 
images from black and wKite cameras 

I seperate adjustment of brightnes levels for each 

of the red - green - blue primary colors 
i Easy transfer of pictures into Pagefox 



ONLY $249.95 




HANDYSCANNER 64 

The Worlds First Handscanner for the 64! 

■ Professional quality super high 400 dots per inch resolution ~ Reads the graphics from any printed document 

■ Converts any material to digitized graphics in seconds ~ B/W setting for crisp reprodution of high contrast line art 

■ Elaborate grey-lone scale digitizes color or black & white photos using 3 built in dithering settings 

■ Enlarge or reduce 3007c to 33% - Graphic memory of 640 X 400 standard (640 X 800 with Pagefox module) 

■ Included software has all the standard functions of a good drawing program 

ONLY $299.95 



PAGEFOX 



3 Easy To Use Editors For Peifect 
Home Desktop Publishing 



GRAPHIC EDITOR ~ TEXT EDITOR ~ LAYOUT EDITOR 

■ Completely menu driven 

■ 100Kb storage enlargement module keeps entire page in memory 

■ Uses proportional mouse or joystick for total control over text, graphics or picture 



ONLY $139.95 





ACTION REPLAY V 6.0 

THE ULTIMATE UTILITY/BACKUP CARTRIDGE FOR THE C64/J28 

Allows You To Freeze The Action Of Any Memory Resident Program And Make A Complete Backup To Disk 



WARP 25 - The worids fastest disk serial Turbo 

■ Typical backup will reload in under 5 seconds 

■ No special formats-save directly into Warp mode 

■ Warp Save/Load available straight from BASIC 
RAMLOADER - Loads most commercial originals 

25 times faster than normal! 
UNIQUE CODE CRACKER MONITOR - 

■ Full monitor features 

■ See the code in its Frozen state not Reset slaie 



MORE UNIQUE FEATURES • Menu driven operation 

■ Simple operation: Just press a button at any point 

■ All backups reload WITHOUT cartridge at Warp speed 

■ Sprite killer: Make yourself invincible-disable collisions 

■ Freeze HiRez screen & save in Koala & Paddles formal 

■ Print out any screen in 16 grey scales 

■ 100% compatible with ALL drives and computers 

■ Disk utilities: fast formal, directory, list and many other 
commands operated directly from function keys 



MIDI 64 -Only $49.99 



■ Full specification MIDI at a realistic price 

■ MIDI In - MIDI Out - MIDI Thru 

■ Works with Sampler and Adv, Music System 
MIDI CABLES (4 ft. prof, quality) -Only $*8.99 

FREIi cables when you buy MIDI & ADV. MUSIC ill urnic lime 

DIGITAL SOUND SAMPLER 

Only - $89.99 

THE ADVANCED 
OCP ART STUDIO 

COMPREHENSIVE, USER FRIENDLY ART 
AND DESIGN SOFTWARE 



ADV. MUSIC SYSTEM 

Powerful modular program for creating, editing, 
playing and printing out music 

■ Playback thru internal sound or external MIDI 
keyboard/synthesiser 

■ Print music in proper musical notation together 
with lyrics using PRINTER module 

■ Enter music a note at a time in written music 
format using the EDITOR or via on screen 
piano KEYBOARD emulator or via an 
externally connected MIDI keyboard 

■ Generate almost unlimited sounds wiih the 
flexible SYNTHESIZER module 

■ Linker joins files to form large compositions 



Only - $29.99 



Only - $29.99 



MAKE THE MOST OF YOUR 
ACTION REPLAY 

GRAPHICS SUPPORT DISK 

■ View screens in a slide show sequence 

■ Add scrolling messages to your saved screens 

■ Contains full sprite editor 

■ Explodes sections of saved screens to full size 

Only -$19.99 
SUPERCRUNCHER - only S9 99 

Turn your Action Replay into a super powerful 
program compactor. Reduce programs by up to 
50%! Further compact progrms already crunched 
by Action Replays compactor 



RIO COMPUTERS 

3310 BERWYCK STREET 
U\S VEGAS, NV 891 21 



Add SS.OO shipping/handling in (ha continental U.S.: S8.00 - PR. AK, HI, FPO, APO: S1 1.00-Canada: Other 
foreign orders call or write for shipping charges: C.O.D. orders add SS.OO to above charges: SPECIFIY 
COIrfPUTER MODEL WITH ORDER: VlSA/MC/Checks/Money Orders/C.O.D. Accepted: Please call (or 



return authorization numlier or your package will tje refused ■ 
lee after 15 days: Pnces subject lo change without notice. 



returns ma^ be subject to a 20% restocking 



800-782-9110 

702-454-7700 

IN NEVADA 



tracks 1 through 15 of the disk. The 
first track of this partition will be re- 
served for the partition's own directory. 
On the disk's main (root) directory, the 
partition will show up as the following. 

GOO "ARCADE GAMES" CBM 

Partition from BASIC 

The series of prompts in this program 
makes the process very easy. Of 
course, you can create partitions from 
BASIC if you can decipher the follow- 
ing code given in the user's manual. 

PRIMT#We#,"/0:part//(O(i n3me,"+ 
CHR${startmg tracl^+ CHR$(s/art)nff sectoi)+ 
CHR$(< # of sectors)* CHR$(> # of sectors]* 
",C" 

Especially confusing are the expres- 
sions < # of sectors and > #of sectors. 
Evidently a misprint in the book has 
placed these two expressions in re- 
verse order. After much experimenta- 
tion, I've found that they essentially re- 
fer to the range of sectors contained in 
the partition. The expression < # of sec- 
tors should refer to the high number of 
this range (600 in our example above), 
and > # of sectors should refer to the 
bottom of this range (0 in our exam- 
ple). However, since a CHR$ value 
may fall only within the range of 0-254, 
any partitions of more than 254 sectors 
have to use an adjusted value. 

The > and < signs actually refer to 
the high byte and low byte for a given 
expression. There's a way to calculate 
values for partitions greater than 254 
sectors. If N equals the number of sec- 
tors for a partition, the high byte would 
be represented by INT(N/256). The low 
byte would be represented by N-(low 
byte)*256. Thus, for our partition of 
600, the high byte is INT(600/256) = 2. 
The low byte is 600-2*256 = 88. So. to 
create our partition of 600 blocks, we'd 
issue the foilowing commands. 

OPEN 1S,B,15 

PRINT#15,"/0:ARCADE GAMES,"+ CHR$(1)+ 

CHR$(0)+ CHRS(BB)+ CHRS(Z)+ ",C" 

CHR$(1) refers to the starting track of 
1. CHR$(0) refers to the partition's be- 
ginning sector in track 1. CHR$(88) re- 
fers to the 600 block partition's low 
byte. CHR$(2) refers to the 600 block 
partition's high byte. 

Another Format 

At this point the required blocks have 
been set aside as a partition, but the 
partition can't be used yet. it has to be 
formatted before you can store files in 
it even though the disk itself has al- 
ready been formatted. This creates a 
partition directory (or subdirectory) on 
G-8 COMPUTE JULY 1992 



the first track of the partition. So, with 
the disk still in the drive, the new parti- 
tion is selected by the following line. 

PRINT#1S,"/D:ARCADE GAMES" 

Then the NEW or HEADER commands 
are used to format this partition area. En- 
ter the following line. 

PRINT#15,"N0:ARCADE GAMES, D1": 
CL0SE15 



CARTRIDGES 

in addition io holding more information, 
the 1581 loads programs significantly fast- 
er than the 1541 or 1571. Because of a 
slightly different DOS than that used in a 
1541, the 1581 isn't compatible with 
some fast load cartridges. I use the 
Epyx Fast Load Cartridge with my 1541 , 
but it has to be disabled before I use the 
1581. There are a couple of last load pro- 
grams for the 1581, and these work 
quite well. 

Recently, I bought a Super Snap- 
shot cartridge, after reading that it was 
compatible with the 1581 drive. After us- 
ing it for a while, I'm very impressed 
with the performance o( this cartridge. 
Most of its features work quite well with 
the 1581. The only shortcoming I've 
found is that its file utility isn't able to 
scratch a file from within a partition. 



The partition is now ready to be 
used. We've done in BASIC what the 
Partition Aid program did for us 
through a series of easy-to-understand 
prompts. Files in the partition may now 
be written to, read from, scratched, re- 
named, and so on, 

If you're interested in constructing 
your partitions from BASIC rather than 
using Partition Aid, the following table 
may prove useful. Consult it for a list of 
the high byte and low byte values of 
the given numbers of sectors. 



Low 
Byle 








No. of 


High 


Sectors 


Byte 


120 


120 


160 


160 


200 


200 


240 


240 


280 


24 


320 


64 


360 


104 


400 


144 


440 


184 


480 


224 


520 


8 


560 


48 


600 


88 


640 


128 


680 


168 


720 


208 


760 


248 



Partition Management 

Now that you have partitions on your 
disk, how do you make practical use of 
them? One of the more useful purpos- 
es for partitions is grouping similar 
files. For example, on my SpeedScript 
word processing disk, I've set up one 
partition for the word processor itself, I 
have SpeedScript's accompanying pro- 
grams and utilities (mail merge, 80- 
column preview, right margin justified, 
columns, and so on) in a partition locat- 
ed at tracks 1-8 (320 blocks). In ad- 
dition, 1 have made three other parti- 
tions out of tracks 9-39 for holding 
document files. I call these DOCU- 
fVlENTSI (tracks 9-19), D0CUMENTS2 
{tracks 20-29), and D0CUrv1ENTS3 
(tracks 30-39). 

In each partition, the first track is re- 
served for a directory of that partition; 
the rest of the tracks are available for 
files. This partition directory doesn't 
show up when the disk's main (or root) 
directory is listed. After the partition 
has been selected, the computer 
treats that partition as if it were a disk 
in itself, and its own directory may be 
listed. On the disk's main directory par- 
tition names are listed like other files, 
but the three-letter code (PRG, tJSR, 
SEQ) for a partition is CBtvl. Thus, on 
the word processor disk I described 
above, the disk's main directory looks 
like the following. 



320 


"SPEEDSCRIPT" 


CBM 


400 


"D0CUMENTS1" 


CBM 


360 


■■D0CUMENTS2" 


CBM 


360 


"D0CUMENTS3" 


CBM 


5 


"CHANGE UNIT' 


PRG 


51 


"1581 FAST LOADER' 


PRG 


1 


"1581 PATH" 


PRG 


12 


"COPY 81" 


PRG 


1651 


BLOCKS FREE 





The first four items are my partitions, 
the next four items are utilities I com- 
monly use with the 1581 drive that are 
stored on the unpartitioned part of the 
disk, and the last item lists the blocks 
still available. 

Partition Selection 

Once the disk is inserted in the drive, 
a partition can be selected from BA- 
SIC. The syntax for selecting a partition 
follows. 

OPEN 15,8,15,"/0vart)ffon name" 

Of course, if you're using the 1581 as 
device 9, you should substitute the num- 
ber 9 for the 8 in this statement. Once 
the partition has been selected, you sim- 
ply work with it as if it were a separate 
disk of its own, loading, saving, verify- 
ing, validating, and so on. All of these 
commands affect only the selected par- 



INTRODUCING 



CDrUlPUTE #NET t^ 




CDrUlPUTE # s 

About COMPUTE/NET 
Product Ordering 
Feedback Board 
Coming Events 
Montlily Contest 




Welcome to the grand opening of 
COMPUTE/NET. A wealth of 
information awaits you. Back issues 
of COMPUTE, hard-to-find computer 
books, super software, dazzling 
pictures, challenging games, prizes, 
a complete bulletin board, and 
much more are here. You can even 
talk to the editors and authors of the 
magazine. Lots of surprises are 
planned, so keep your eyes on us. 




FINDUSONQ-LINK 



FREE Q-LINK STARTER KIT, 
FREE TIME. ORDER TODAY! 



Just call our toll-free number or 

return the coupon, and we'll send 
you the Q-Link Starter Kit and 
software free, waive your first 
month's membership fee, and credit 
you with one hour of "Plus" time to 
try the service. Your S9.95 monthly 
fee gives you unlimited access to 
all of our "Basic" services online, 
including a searchable encyclope- 
dia, AND one free'hour of "Plus" 
services. After your free hour, 
you'll pay only $4.80/hour-just 8 
cents per minute-for additional use 
of the service. 



Q-Link is a registered service mark of 
Quantum Computer Services, Inc. 

•Long-distance charges may apply. 
Surcharges apply if you arc a resident of 
Alaska, Hawaii, or Canada. AJlow four to 
six weeks for delivery. 



CH YEo! Send me my FREE Q-Link software, waive my 
first month's membership fee, and credit me with one 
FREE* hour of Plus time to explore the service and try 
COMPUTE/NET. 



Name 

Address- 
City 



State. 



Zip . 



Home Phone. 



^k_ 



MAIL TO 



Use of Q-Link requires a VISA, 
MasterCard, or checking account. 



Q-Link 

8619 Westwood Center Drive 
Vienna, Virginia 22182-9897 



Call 1S00-782-2278, Ext. 2414 today 



tition, not the rest of the disk. 

With the 64, all of the familiar BASIC 
2 commands. NEW, COPY, RENAME, 
SCRATCH, INITIALIZE, and VALI- 
DATE, which work with the 1541 drive, 
work with the 1581. If you have a 128, 
use the BASIC 7.0 commands as with 
the 1571. A partition's directory may al- 
so be listed from within the partition 
with the standard LOAD "$",8: LIST 

Rather than using BASIC, I prefer us- 
ing 1581 Path, a short machine lan- 
guage program that appeared in the 
June 1990 Gazette. This one-block pro- 
gram offers a simplified syntax for se- 
lecting partitions, loading programs, 
and moving between partitions, 

From within your word processor, it's 
usually quite easy to move from parti- 
tion to partition. Most word processors 
have a command for accessing the 
disk drive. In SpeedScript, the 
keypress sequence is Ctrl-A. After press- 
ing these keys you simply type /parti- 
tion name and hit Return. If you need 
to go to the disk's main directory, en- 
ter Ctrl-A, simply type /, and press Re- 
turn. This should result in the message 
02, partition selected. 

Using Different Device Numbers 

A potential software problem involves 
programs that routinely access drive 8. 
If you're using the 1581 as drive 9, 



you'll encounter problems. If you're fa- 
miliar with machine language monitors 
or disk sector editors, you may be able 
to modify such programs to work from 
drive 9. Most programs use the follow- 
ing six-byte combination to open a 
disk file. 

A9 02 A2 08 AO 02 

These bytes are the same as the BA- 
SIC command OPEN 2,8,2. To access 
other drives in BASIC, substitute the 
new drive number instead of using 8. 
The most recently accessed drive num- 
ber is stored in memory location 186. 
In machine language, therefore, 
you'd change the A2 08 to A2 BA so 
the program would load its files from 
the drive from which you booted it. 

Utilities for the 1581 

In addition to 1581 Path, which I've al- 
ready mentioned, the utilities that 
come on the demo disk supplied with 
the 1581 are very good. Also, 1 have 
found several Gazette programs worth- 
while additions to my 1581 library. 

Check out 1581 FastLoader (Janu- 
ary 1990). This program provides high- 
speed data transfers that are up to 
nine times faster than the standard Ker- 
nal load routine. It works with both the 
64 and 128 and allows you to relocate 



the program to nearly any memory lo- 
cation and to create autoboot files. 

Copy 81 (November 1989) allows 
you to copy any BASIC or machine lan- 
guage file from the root or a partition of 
one disk to the root or a partition of an- 
other disk. It also lets you copy files 
from the root or partition of one disk to 
another partition on the same disk. 

Another hefpful program is 1581 Di- 
rectory Sorter (July 1989). It sorts your 
directory entries in both alphabetical 
and reverse alphabetical order. It also 
allows you to arrange files manually in 
any order you want. This utility has the 
ability to detect whether it's running on 
a 64 or 128 and whether the 128 is in 
40- or 80-column mode. In 128 mode, 
the program uses fast mode whenever 
possible. Unfortunateiy, this program 
works only on the disk's main directo- 
ry, not on a partition's directory. 

All in all. I highly recommend the 
1581 drive to all 64 and 128 users. Its 
speed and storage capacity are im- 
mense improvements over the 1541 
drive and, to a lesser extent, over the 
1571 drive. Rigid-shelled 3y?-inch 
disks are easier to handle and store 
than vulnerable 5Vt-inch floppies. □ 



George Gunn is a Commodore owner 
who lives in Redding, California. 




G-10 COMPUTE JULY 1992 



YOUR PRODUaiVITY! 



Harness the potential of y^ 
64 and 128 with these 
powerful programs. 

Get more work out of your 64 and 1 28 

with these two new disk products from 

COMPUTE'S Gazette - the 1 992 

Best of Gazette Utilities, and 

the Gazette Graphics Grab 

Bag! 

The 1992 Best of 

Gazette Utilities 

Seize control of your operating 

system and your world! 

Here's what's on tt-MetaBASIC 64, 
MetaBASIC 1 28, Quick, Sprint II, 
Ultrafont+, RAMDisk 64, RAMDisk 1 28, 
BASSEM, SciCalc 64, List Formatter, 
MegaSqueeze. 




The Gazette Graphics 

Grab Bag 

Do it all with Commodore 
graphics! 



Here's what's on it- 

Starburst Graphics, 

Screen Designer 128, 

128 Graphics Compactor, 

64 Animator, VDC Graphics, 

Dissolve 1 28, Super Slideshow, 

28 Animator, 1526 Pri|tScreen, 

Supratechnic, Medium-F«so!ution 

Graphics, Screen Maker,'GAS!64- 

Special Edition, GAS!128-Special 

Edition. 



ORDER 

THEM 

TODAY! 



Extend Ybur Computer Power With This Powerful Software! 



YES! 



I wani to pump up my productivity! Please send me the 
disks checl<ed below at $1 1 .95 each. 



The 1992 Best of Gaiette Utilities 

The Gazette Graphics Grab Bag 

Subtotal 

Sales Tax (Residents o1 NC and NY please add appropriate sales tax for your 

area. Canadian orders, add 7% goods and services tax.) 

Shipping and Handling (S2.00 U.S. and Canada, $3.00 surface mail, $5.00 

airmail per disk.) 

Tola! Enclosed 



MasterCard and VISA accepted on orders with subtotal over $20. 
L 



Check or MoRey Order 

Credit Card No. 


MasterCard 


VISA 

ExD. Date 




Siflrature 


Daytime Telephone No. 


(RHjuined) 






Name 


Address 


Citv 


State/Province 


> 1991 tJtilities, 3: 


ZIP/Postal Code 




Mail this coupon to COMPUTE' 
Greensboro, NC 27408. 


!4 West Wendover Ave. 


Ste. 200, 



REVIEWS 



CHIP'S 
CHALLENGE 

If you love puzzles, then 
Chip's Challenge from Epyx 
is for you. As the game be- 
gins, Chip MacCallahan, a re- 
al nerd, finds out he may be 
able to join his beloved Me- 
linda's computer club, the 
Bit Busters. However, 
there's a catch to this offer. 
He must first complete 144 
levels of a maze-like puzzle 
before he can attain the high- 
est membership privilege of 
this very exclusive club. 
{That privilege is to be near 
Melinda, of course!) Your 
job is to help Chip complete 
these levels so he can be 
close to the love of his life. 

The first few levels of 
Chip's Challenge are easy 
But don't be fooled; the 
game gets more challeng- 
ing as you progress to the 
higher levels. Each level is 
slightly more difficult than 
the previous one, but you 
have more than one chance 
to pass a level. For exam- 
ple, if you get killed by a 
monster, then you get to try 
that level again. 

Some levels provide hints 
on what to do; others don't. 
From time to time you'll en- 
counter levels that seem im- 
possible to pass. Don't lose 
sleep over this, though. Af- 
ter several tries, the game 
gives you the option of con- 
tinuing at this level or going 
to the next. It's best to avoid 
both of these options, howev- 
er. Since scores are based 
on what level you reach and 
how quickly you pass to the 
next level of play restarting 
or not completing a level on- 
ly lowers your score. 

If you exit the game for 
any reason, you don't have 
to start at the first level. Just 
remember the code for the 
level you reached, and you 
can start again at that point. 

G-12 COMPUTE JULY 1992 



Each level has different 
types of puzzles to solve. 
No matter what obstacles 
you encounter, you must 
pass through a blinking exit 
to go to the next level. You 
may have to find your way 
through a maze in a certain 
amount of time. At another 
level, you may have to col- 



picked up along the way. 

There are many items to 
aid you at each level. 
Shields are important in that 
they allow you to walk 
through fire or even on wa- 
ter. Cleats prevent you from 
slipping on ice. Another 
very useful item is a mag- 
net. If you manage to get 




You II find plenty to keep you busy as you try to complete 144 
levels of maze-like puzzles in Chip's Challenge. 



lect a required number of 
microchips or other items 
while avoiding creatures 
that chase you. Some chips 
and items may be hidden or 
placed where they aren't 
easy to find. You'll have to 
solve a problem or two to 
get to these items. For exam- 
ple, walls can appear that 
were once invisible, or you 
may have to find a way to 
cross a castle moat. 

Sometimes the order of 
how you try to accomplish a 
task is vital. At some of the 
more difficult levels, more 
than one type of puzzle 
must be solved at the same 
time. An information window 
always displays your level, 
the amount of time you 
have remaining to complete 
that level, the number of 
chips still to be collected, 
and the tools or keys you've 



one of these, then you have 
control on force floors. If you 
can't get through a colored 
door, you may need a key 
of the same color. Colored 
buttons can also unlock 
doors for you and some- 
times either control the move- 
ments of creatures you may 
encounter or deactivate 
bombs. Sometimes these 
creatures are guarding 
these keys or items you 
need. Blocks of dirt help 
you get across water. Numer- 
ous teleports jump you to oth- 
er areas of the puzzle within 
that same level. 

Chip's Challenge is very 
easy to learn and play You 
use your joystick to control 
Chip's movements. The man- 
ual tells you what types of ob- 
stacles you'll face, but the ex- 
perience you gain along the 
way is important, too. As 



you progress to higher lev- 
els, you'll know more of 
what's expected of you and 
have a better idea of how to 
solve a particular puzzle. 
Thus, what you learn from 
early levels can help later in 
the game. For example, you 
may realize that certain crea- 
tures move in similar pat- 
terns or shoving a particular 
block on the water will help 
you build a bridge to cross 
a moat. 

The documentation is 
brief but effective in getting 
you on your way to solving 
the 144 levels of puzzles. Af- 
ter a quick reading, you'll 
know what to expect and 
pick up some useful hints. It 
also provides a list of items 
and obstacles that you'll en- 
counter while playing the 
game. 

The graphics and sound 
for Chip's Challenge were av- 
erage for the 64. Sometimes 
I found it was hard to tell 
what an onscreen item was 
supposed to be. If you have 
the manual nearby, most of 
the items in question can be 
matched to appropriate 
items from the list, The 
game's music gets boring af- 
ter the first ten levels, so I 
did turn down the volume. 

Overall, I rate Chip's Chal- 
lenge highly This delightful 
and interesting one-player 
game is a lot of fun to play, 
it'll keep you amused for 
hours and test your problem- 
solving skills as well. 

Chip really wants to join 
the Bit Busters to be with Me- 
linda, but he needs your 
help, Are you up for a real 
challenge? Chip is anxious- 
ly waiting for you at level 1 ! 

CHRIS SAUCIER 

Commodore 6A or 128— $34.95 

EPYX 

500 Allerton St. 
Redwood City, CA 94063 
(415) 368-3200 

Circle Reader Service Number 341 



GAZETTE 
EASK L/BE^ARY 

VALUE-PACKED SOFTWARE 
AT AFFORDABLE PRICES 



All Gazette disks are menu-driven for ease of use — and they feature complete 
documentation. Just load and you're ready to gol 



SpeedScrlpt $11.95 

COMPUTE Publications' most popular program 
ever, Powerful word processing package includes 
SpeedScripf for the 64, SpeedScript 128, spelling 
checkers for both 64 and 128 versions, plus an 
additional dozen support programs, including 
mail-merge and word-count utilities. 

Gazette Index $7.96 

Every article and department from Gazette — July 
1983 through December 1989 issues — is indexed: 
features, games, reviews, programming, "Bug- 
Swatter," "Feedback," and the other columns, 
Disk features pull-down menus, help screens, 
superfast searching/sorting capabilities, and 
much more. 

Best Gazette Games $9:95 

Best dozen arcade and strategy games ever 
published in Gazette all on one disk. All games for 
Commodore 64, Titles: Crossroads II: Pandemo- 
nium, Basketball Sam & Ed, Delta War, Heat 
Seeker, Omicron, Powerboll, Q-BIrd, Trap, Arcade 
Volleyball, Mosaic, Power Poker, and Scorpior) II. 



Gazette's Power Tools $9.95 

Fourteen of the most important utilities for the 
64 ever published in Gazette. For serious users. 
Titles: MetaBASIC, Disk Rapid Transit Mob Maker, 
Ultrafont+, Quick!, Disk Editor, Basically Music, 
PrintScreen, 1526 PrintScreen, Fast Assembler, 
Smart Disassembler, Comparator, Sprint II, and 
Turbo Format. 

Tire GEOS Collection $ 11 .95 

Gazette's best 1 3 programs for GEOS and GEOS 
128 users. Selection includes utilities, applications, 
and games. Titles: Super Printer Driver, Skeet, File 
Saver, Help Pad, Word Count, Directory Printer, 
Quick Clock, SlideShow, File Retriever, Screen 
Dumper, Font Grabber, GeoPuzzie, and 
GeoConverfer. 

128 Classics $11-95 

Thirteen of Gazette's best 1 28 programs, including 
utilities, games, and applications. Titles: 
MetaBASIC 128, RAMDisk 128, 80-Column Disk 
Sector Editor, MuitiSort, Block Out, Miami Ice, 
The Animals' Show, Cribbage, XPressCard, Sound 
Designer, Video Slide Show, Math Graphics, and 
3'D BarGrapher. 



SPECIAL OFFER! 



Ail 6 DISKS FOR ONLY $49,951 



A $13.00 SAVINGS! 



All prices include shipping & handling. 

SpeedScript D 

Gazette Index D 

Best Gazette Games D 

Gazette's Power Tools □ 

The GEOS CQllection D 

1 28 Classics D 

Special 6-Disk Offer D 

Subtotal 

Tax* 

Outside U.S, or Canada" 

Total 



Name. 



Si 1 .95 
$ 7.95 
$ 9,95 
$ 9,95 
$1 1 ,95 
$1 1 ,95 
$49,95 



Address . 
City 



. State . 



.ZIP. 



Amount 
enclosed 



Mall to 



Method of 

payment n Check or Money Order 
D VISA or MasterCard 
(fa orders over $20) 



Gazette Disks 

324 W. Wendover Ave., Ste. 200 

Greensboro, NC 27408 

Credit card no Exp, date 

Signoture (required) 

Ooytime phone number 



■ Residents of North Carolina ood F^w Yofk add oppropfiale sales tox. Conodion orders, odd 7% goods and services fox. 

■■ For deliveiy outside the U.S or Canoda. odd SI fof surface moB or S3 for airmail. All orders must be in U.S. funds drown on a U.S. bank. 



REVIEWS 



PERFECT PRINT 

I love GEOS. I use it all the 
time, but there's practically 
no way around the weak 
link in its system. GEOS dot- 
matrix printouts look like 
they've been, well, printed 
on a dot-matrix printer. Pro- 
fessional Page on Amiga or 
geoWrite on the IBM use 
beautiful scalable fonts that 
make dot-matrix printouts ri- 
val laser printouts for quali- 
ty. With GEOS, unless you 
have a laser printer, you're 
stuck with blocky, jaggy, am- 
ateurish-looking fonts. 

That's all changed now, 
because Creative Micro De- 
signs, a company that 
seems determined single- 
handedly to carry the Com- 
modore computers through 
the 1990s, has released Per- 
fect Print, a new print pack- 
age for geoWrite. Its print- 
outs, using the GEOS LQ 
application, are incredible! 

Let's get a few details 
straight. For one thing, Per- 
fect Print works only with 
geoWrite. It won't work with 
geoPubiish, no matter how 
hard we might wish. GEOS 
LQ, which produces the in- 
credible geoWrite printouts, 
is only one part of the Per- 
fect Print package. 

Also included are a set of 
HO {for High Quality) printer 
drivers and fonts designed 
to work especially well with 
each other. These drivers 
are standard GEOS printer 
drivers that work with any ap- 
plication, enhancing the print- 
outs by using advanced in- 
terpolation techniques. They 
offer better results than the 
drivers that come with the 
GEOS system, even better 
than double-strike drivers. 
They aren't the stars of the 
Perfect Print show, though. 
You can find printer drivers 
on QuantumLink that will 
outperform the ones in the 
Perfect Print package. 

G-14 COMPUTE JULY 1992 



The star of the Perfect 
Print package is GEOS LQ. 
Nothing anywhere can beat 
it. You won't believe it the 
first time one of these print- 
outs comes slowly (and I do 
mean slowly) out of your low- 
ly 9-pin workhorse. 

I'm not talking about 
some pattern that's been 



der the printhead. 

To be fair, there are a few 
niggling inconveniences. 
Speed is the primary trade- 
off, as ! mentioned above. A 
fuli page from geoWrite can 
take ten or fifteen minutes to 
print. Also, larger point sizes 
don't have the exquisite qual- 
ity of the smaller ones. As a 



Thb text It formtltKl ki Calfomtii I(Hh4i1. I'm gong to prkit It ml ifling in Epwn 24-pin printsr and 

lis LQ-eoo printer driver. D swit(ti to M poht, boM Tace, eF3iiy,3ni OUttRI mo<i$s 
and even pttit a grapfiic: 




This texi le lormalled In CaKlornaLO 10-point. riri going lo prini it out ueing en 

Epson 24-pin pfinier and Perleci Pfini'e "GEOS LQ" syeiem. I'll switch lo 14 poinl, 

bold face, //S/fCS,Sn<i ©yCllnS modes, one a ^ancy-aiyeed ^oiU, 

ar>d even prim a graphic: 




Here are examples of the way GEOS prints text and grapliics 
(above). Beneath them are similar examples from Perfect Print. 



overprinted so many times 
that all the jaggies have 
been mushed into the 
weave of the paper and 
struck so repeatedly that a 
small font looks like a 
smudge. No, this is print 
with absolutely perfect de- 
tails, with precise curves 
and angles — even on a six- 
point font in italics. I'm talk- 
ing printouts to die for! 

Oh, come on, you say; 
there must be a catch. The 
manual is probably sketchy 
and obscure. The setup pro- 
cedure probably requires a 
degree in advanced sys- 
tems analysis to implement. 
The thing probably over- 
heats the printer. But, no, 
the manual is clear and con- 
cise. It contains more infor- 
mation than most users will 
ever need. The setup proce- 
dure is straightforward, and 
your printer won't get hot un- 



matter of fact, the larger siz- 
es are basically printed us- 
ing the same kind of interpo- 
lation routine used in the HO 
drivers, which is good but 
not perfect. And while you 
can use most of the features 
of geoWrite, you can't use 
the page, date, or time func- 
tions in the header or footer 
to let the system print those 
for you automatically. 

The only fonts that will 
print out in such high quali- 
ty are the specially designat- 
ed LQ fonts. Of course, 
there are more than 40 
such fonts available with 
plenty of great designs to 
choose from. If you're so in- 
clined, you can always con- 
vert or create more using 
the font-creation utilities in- 
cluded on the disk. On top 
of this, CMD has been active- 
ly soliciting some of the lead- 
ing font designers to con- 



vert their fonts to LQ format. 

GEOS LQ is one of the 
more user-friendly programs 
around. You can start it 
from within geoWrite, using 
an included desk accesso- 
ry The control panel screen 
includes features you've 
probably never considered. 
The system fully supports 
both 9- and 24-pin printers, 
and everything is well ex- 
plained in the documenta- 
tion. You need know virtual- 
ly nothing about control 
codes or your printer's inner 
workings to use GEOS LQ. 

If you have any technical 
expertise, though, you'll find 
it possible to affect the 
GEOS LQ system at a basic 
level by changing the config- 
ure files. These files are ac- 
tually geoWrite documents, 
containing the various infor- 
mation your system needs 
to properly use GEOS LQ. 
Since they're standard geoW- 
rite documents, they can be 
examined and altered quite 
easily Some variations are al- 
ready included on the disk, 
such as a file to set page 
length to label height and 
another to tell GEOS LQ to 
look for the fonts on a differ- 
ent drive from the one geoW- 
rite is on. 

These nifty touches are 
just icing on the cake, how- 
ever. Unless you use GEOS 
for geoPubiish or geoPaint 
only, you won't want to be 
without the Perfect Print pack- 
age. Once again, CMD 
takes the Commodore and 
GEOS to unexpected and in- 
credible heights. 

STEVE VANDER ARK 



Commodore 64 or 128— S34.95 for 
all drivers, utilities, and seven fonts; 
$29.95 for package witti 45 LQ 
fonts; $49.95 for all drivers, ulilities, 
and 45 LQ fonts 

CREATIVE MICRO DESIGNS 

P.O. Box 646 

East Longmeadow, UA 01028 

(800) 638-3263 

Circle Reader Service Numlwr 342 




8 BIT 

PO BOX 542 

LINDENHIIRST NY 1 1757-0542 

NOW BKINOINO YOU ORBAT PRICES ON 
COMMERCIAL SOFTWARE TOOt 



THESE ARE INDICATED 
PSOCmAMS,A24DC!OMB 

COhSPI^TE IN THEIR 
aUGINAL PACKAGING. 



6PACSETS 

BACH SET 15.00 



I: ASST. (St«iTnt+) 
2: ADULT IMAGES 
3: EDUCATIONAL 
4:GAMES(TBt™+) 
5: DEMO&WOVIHS 

6: PRODUcnvmr 

7:GEOSCLIPART 
8: RECIPES SET 
ftUTELmESSET 
A; CHRISTMAS 
B: ASST. (Mario +) 
C: MUSIC SET 
D: ART GALLERY 
E: GEOS FILES 





HINDSCAPE 
HANDGRIP 
JOYSTICK 

ONLY $5.00 



INCLUDES THE SEGA HTTS 
OUT RUN, AFTERBURNER, 
mUNDERBLADE, SHINOBI, 
AND At.TFM SYNDROME 

A$190VALUE! 




MANY ITEMS ARE CIX>SEOUTS , 
AMOUNT OF STOCK IS LIMITED I 
Add St. 00 shipping per item OTdercd*U.&. PaadaOnlyi 
SORRY NO C.O.D.'s OR CREDIT CARD ORDERS 
FOR A FREE COPY OF OUR CATALOG, CALL: 
(516)-957-1110 MONDAY-FRIDAY 10 mm to 5 pm EST 



Circle Reader Service Number 162 




Commodore Logo 

Just 
$19.95! 

Why buy Logo? Because it is the best way 
for you to learn programming and for your kids 
to explore math and problem solving. Logo is 
used in schools and colleges across the U.S. 

Famous for turtle graphics, Logo lets you 
draw complex designs with a few simple com- 
mands. Easier and more powerful than BASIC, 
Logo is the perfect language for both beginners 
and experienced programmers. You'll love 
Logo's sprites and music, list processing, global 
and local variables, recursion, and screen editor. 

Now, you can buy the complete Commodore 
Logo for just $19.95! Two disks plus 380 page 
Tutorial & Reference Manual. Send your check 
for just $19.95 plus $4.25 s&h, or call with 
your VisaMC number. Call toll-free today! 

1-800-354-2744 



Terrapin Software 

400 Riverside SL 



(207) 878-8200 
Portland, ME 04103 



Clitie Reader Service Number 148 



^%S AND 






MONEY 

Yes, save time and money! Subscribe to the Gazette 
Disk and get all the exciting, fun-filled Gazette pro- 
grams for your Commodore 64 or 128— already on 
disk! 

Subscribe today, and month after month you'll 
get all the latest, most challenging, and fascinating 
programs published in the corresponding issue of 
COMPUTE. 

New on the Gazette Disk! In addition to the 
programs that appear in the magazine, you'll also 
get outstanding bonus programs. These programs, 
which are often too large to offer as type-ins, are 
available only on disk— they appear nowhere else. 

As another Gazette Disk extra, check out 



"Gazette Gallery," where each month we present the 
very best in original 64 and 128 artwork. 

So don't waste another moment. Subscribe to- 
day to COMPUTE'S Gazette Disk and get 12 issues 
for only $49.95. You save almost 60% off the single- 
issue price. Clip or photocopy and mail completed 
coupon today 

Individual issues of the disk are available for 
S9.95 (plus $2.00 shipping and handling) by writing 
to COMPUTE, 324 West Wendover Avenue, Suite 
200, Greensboro, North Carolina 27408. 



it a! Start my one-year subscription 
to COMPUTE'S Gazette Disk right away 
for only $49.95/ 

D Payment enclosed (check or money order) 
D Charge D MasterCard D Visa 



Acct. No. . 

Signature . 
Name 



. Exp. Date . 



^ReqwreO) 



Address . 

City 

State/ 
Province . 



ZIP/ 

. Postal Code. 



Mail to COMPUTES Gazette Disk, P.O. Bo* 3250. Harlan. lA 5-1593-2430 

■ Residents ot nc and NY. please add appropnale sales tax for your area. Canadian 

orders, add 7% goods and services tax. 




Everything's included! 

Features, games, reviews, 
education/home applications, 
programming, bugswatter, 
feedback, and columns! 

A superb interface includes pull-down 
menus, help screens, and keyboard, 
joystick, or mouse control. Features in- 
clude super-fast searching and sorting 
capabilities. An options screen allows 
you to choose text colors, drive num- 
ber, and input device. And there's full 
documentation on disk. 

Choose from three modes of opera- 
tion— 6row5e for quick scanning, view 
for detailed information and descrip- 
tions, and edit for adding items from 
upcoming issues— and print to any 
printer. There's even a turbo-load op- 
tion for maximum disk-access speed. 




To order, send $7.95 per disk, the 
quantity of disks ordered, check or 
money order,' your name and com- 
plete street address: 

1991 Gazette Index 

324 West Wendover Avenue 

Suite 200 

Greensboro, NC 27408 

• Please add $2 shipping & handling ($5 foreign) for 
eacK disk (residents ol NC, NJ, NY please add appli- 
cable sales tax: Canadian orders, add 7% goods and 
services tax). 

All payments must be in U.S. (unds. Please allow + 
weeks for delivery. 



REVIEWS 

PREDATOR 2 

So many computer games based on 
movies are nothing more than poor 
games wrapped in catchy visuals and 
logos from the film they represent. 
That's why you should be especially 
careful when buying games of this 
type. You should look beyond the ref- 
erences to and scenes from the film 
and search for some indication of 
what the game's all about. 

Predator 2 has a strong basic game 
element that was adapted to fit the mov- 
ie's plot. This is the way it's supposed 
to work. Predator 2 is a four-level shoot- 
'em-up that puts the player in the heat 
of battle in 1997 Los Angeles. You 
play the part of Danny Glover's char- 
acter in the movie, Detective Lieuten- 
ant Mike Harhgan. Your ultimate goal is 
to beat the Predator creature that is 
stalking Los Angeles. You must survive 
four levels of action before the climac- 
tic battle. Each level is tougher than its 
predecessor and gives you less time to 
breathe. Although Predator 2 isn't diffi- 
cult to play, only the best of the best 
will make it through the game. Most of 
your efforts will be spent trying to sur- 
pass your previous score in an attempt 
to make to the end. 

Game mechanics are simple, Move 
the cross hairs around the sideways- 
scrolling screen with a joystick (recom- 
mended) or keyboard and press the 
fire button or space bar to fire your cur- 
rent weapon. Take out all the criminals 
who show signs of resistance and do it 
quickly. Power items make your stay 
on the current level more manageable. 
These include better and faster-firing 
weapons, body armor, and ammo 
clips that appear occasionally on the 
screen. Fire at them to collect them. A 
wave of criminals at the end of each lev- 
el usually depletes your reserve lives 
and eliminates your chance for suc- 
cess. During this last volley, all of your 
shots must be well placed or the ene- 
my will overwhelm you. 

It'll take a few games before you get 
anywhere with Predator 2. More than 
any other computer game, good aim 
and conservation of ammo are extreme- 
ly important. If you hold down the fire 
tiutton, your weapon will continue to 
fire at its maximum rate. The Mark I As- 
sault Shotgun shoots as fast as a ma- 
chine gun, and it's very tempting to 
spread your fire. It's important to 
shoot the enemy in short bursts rather 
than laying down a constant bombard- 
ment because you'll need the firepow- 
er later in the level. Therein lies the key 
to Predator 2. Successful players will 



learn to anticipate the enemies' appear- 
ances and eliminate the enemies be- 
fore they get a chance to shoot. The 
longer you avoid return fire, the longer 
your current life lasts, and the better 
your chance at finishing the game. 

Thie four levels are varied, with numer- 
ous challenges and unique features. 
You see the Predator's outline in all of 
the levels as he stalks his prey, but 
don't fire at him! If you do, he turns one 
of his weapons on you instead of the 
criminals. The first level takes place on 
the Los Angeles streets, with drug crim- 
inals against the police. It's a practice 
level compared to what's coming next. 

The second level thrusts you into the 
penthouse apartment of the drug lord 
Ramon Vega. There are more crimi- 
nals, and they come from all directions. 
The third level takes place in the sub- 
way tunnels. Just as in the real world, 
the subway's lights affect gameplay, es- 
pecially when they shut off and you 
can't see the enemy. If you can sur- 
vive, you'll soon confront the Predator. 
The last level opens the doors of a 
slaughterhouse for your infiltration. 
This abandoned warehouse is the per- 
fect lair for the Predator An exciting bat- 
tle concludes the game — if you can 
make it this far, 

Graphics are standard for Predator 
2. This late in the life cycle of the 64, 
developers are more concerned with 
providing a good game with good 
graphics than they are with providing a 
poor game with great graphics. Preda- 
tor 2 is the former. You can distinguish 
the guns before you collect them, but 
to help the less experienced, the 
name of each gun appears below it on 
the screen. An addictive theme tune 
makes Predator 2 a bit more exciting. 
Sound effects are fairly common. 
From a bells-and-whistles point of 
view, Predator 2 doesn't have much to 
offer. What shines through is strong 
gameplay. 

Predator 2 is the latest product from 
the Konami/lmage Works partnership 
for the 64 and 128. It makes good use 
of the machine's sphte and animation 
capabilities and packs a lot of fun in a 
simple game framework. 

The constant challenge and addic- 
tion most players will find in Predator 2 
is especially attractive to diehard shoot- 
'em-up fans. See if you can take out 
one of the more intelligent and deadly 
hunters in the universe! 

RUSS CECCOIA 

Commodore 64 or 128— $14.95 

KONAMI/IMAGE WORKS 

900 Deerfield Pkwy. 

Buffalo Grove, IL 60089 

(708) 215-5100 

Circle Rrader Servin Number 343 O 



Calc II 

The Fastest 
Spreadsheet 
for the 
Commodore 64 



Ca^c fl makes your rratn wor k a ixeeza 
- Wne^i^sT I's 3 moigage caciyator. 
buc^If^, ofkeof^rgspcns statist cs. 
Or use rt for your ron-math ^wres li^ 
organirg phone iTH/r. Bars or fr.a>«n9 a 
Ghopo>ng fcsii: 

• Uses Comrrhxione nnaih routrves tor 
powor and sooed * gets rasufis twtca 
dA fast as. cOtr.0e'.\lOr's ■ ^deai lor 
databases - sod by row or coiumr * 
View lots o( iniorrmaiJon fast wrth up lo 
four configursIM n^noowa, row ana 
coimn teJoTQ • Quc*t. respansivB 
Cu-scoTg ■ tntteo&xJentV adjuslab'a 
DGC-ma' paces, w.cnh and pos-iorng 



of data • L^oe'case, Icwaxase and 
CoTfToaoregraphcsaiJ avaa&Je ■ Ba' 
graphs on-screen w* text • Over t*a 
cfazan tunctors, inc:iijdr>g LOOKUP. 
AV2, IF, RND. SIN a FIX * 24D rchvs Dy 
ZiO cCuTins • Easy lo rerremDer com- 
manda • Uses di&k or Iaf» • Sirrcd& 
wofksheot setup • Easy text entry. 
Thfl Package inciudeg a Detailed User's 
Guide with quiclt start into and 
spreadsheet lips. Also on dak wr£h Gate 
II. twot/iiJTy programs and over40faafly 
to LBO vcrksheels, Onfy £29.95 (pJus 
S455 shpDng and hancing). Please 
a'&/^ i-7 'f/eeks fiy d^very. 



PANKHURST PROGRAMMING P.O.Box 49135' Montreal • Ouebec ' Canada 'HIN STB 



Circle Reeder Sarvlcs Njmber 152 



New for the CJ281 KeyDOS ROMl 

The KeyC^OS ROM is a chip lor Ihs emptv sochvt inside your C128 and adds mora than 
40 new instantly Available ftatures only a keypress or two away! 
20 KeyQOS F keys for simpfe 'pomt b ckk^ multiple drive access. All major DOS funclions. Fast- 
load C$4 programs in 12S mode, vjew SEQ files, execule batch files. PrinI, copy, view, scratch or 
rename multiple files. ASCII/CBM converter full 1 581 subdirectory support! RAMDOS supports 
HEUs up to 2MB. GEOS RBooi. Disk edrior. ML debugger, alarm clock, screen dump editor. 
LOTS MORE! Satisfaction Guaranteed! Write fof more information. 
Only S32.50. See why C12B users say that KeyDOS ROM is 3 f^UST! 

Antigrav Toolkit, PO Box 1074, Cambridge, MA 02142 

Shipping outside ot US, Canada and Mexico add S3 



Circle Reader Service Number 155 



LOTSA DISKSI THE BEST in 64/128 PD. 

GEOS, Graphics, Clipart, Demos, Games, Bible, 

S(D/MIDI, Educational, Basic 8 

NEW! Graphics Scanning Service 

Send stamp for FREE catalog or $2 for sample ctlsk. 

Disltoveries 

in PDSoftvsre PO Box 9153, Waukegan, IL 60079 




circle Reader Service Number 190 



C64/128 PUBLIC DOMAIN SOFTWARE 

REQUEST FREE CATALOG or send S2 for sample disk and catalog (RE- 
FUNDABLE). Categories Include education, utilities, games, business, 
PRINT SHOP grophtcs, pre-fested programs and more. Rent for 75« or 
buy as low as Sl.OO per disk side or for 80c for 70 or more. S20 order 
gets 4 free disks of your choice. 
NEXT DAY SHIPPING! SINCE 1986 

CALOKE INDUSTRIES (Dept. GK) 

PC BOX 18477. RAYTOWN, f^O 64133 



VISA I 



Circle Reader Service Number 25S 



KodeKrakr Ltd. 



Proudly presents a new innovation in software securrly check DE-protection! PASSCODE 
KRAKR! removes time consuming and often annoying documenlalion secunty checks in 
many of your games software programs. Lists are continually updated with ihe latest and 
Qceatssl software releases available on diski System also uses parameters which are easily 
updaled wilti our "newest releases" list. Also avaitable— THE PARAMETER HOTLINE—call 
on us to customize your favonte (registered owners only)! Don'l iet lost documents ruin 
anottier expensive program. TO ORDER CUSTOMIZATION PACKAGE, send t21.95*$4.00 
S/H to: ■ 

KodeKbakr Ltd. 

761 Meade Lane • Virginia Beach, VA 23455 



DISKS O'PLENTY INC 

7958 PINES BLVD. SUITE 270A 

PEMBROKE PINES FL 33024 

(305) 963-7750 

Call or write for free descriptive catalog of 
C64I128 Public Domain & Shareware 

Ctioose from over 900 Disks 
Adult list of over 50 Disks available 
to those 1B or over 
021 MU SiD MUSIC UTILITIES 
PRINTS HOP UTILITIES 
JR HSGH EDUCATION 
HIGH SCHOOL EDUC. 
TYPING /SPANISH 
COI^PUTER SCIENCE 
PIRATES TOOLBOX 
FOREIGN ARCADE 
CASINO-BOARD GAMES 
GEOS FONTS 
LOTTERY PROGRAMS 
COLLECTORS CORNER 



O 
O 



in 


n- 


f^=^ 


LU 




li- 


•2 


O 


CD 


n 




Ml 


Q) 


1- 


o 


s 


o 


-I 



o 



019GR 
019ED 
062 ED 
033ED 
031 ED 

01 OUT 
119GA 
022GA 
021GE 

002 MS 
003MS 



Circle Reader Service Number 253 



THE STRATEGY/CAMPAIGN GAMES 
ofJACKO'ROSES .t»2 



lor play on CommoiJore 64/1 2S and Plus 4 

[6 1/4" disc. Specify 11 for Plus 4) 
$19.00 Eacti or $55.00 for all 3! 



THE RECENT UNPLEASANTNESS 



Individual conlrol ol 43 Conlederate Divisions't 49 
Bridges. Could you have lurned back the Federal on- 
slaught? Don't re-fight Ihe Civil War, declare your own! 



CQMSOPAC : Ttie Guadalcanal Campaiqn 



Engage Ihe Imperial Japanese Navy in Ironbotlom 

Sound. Lead air attacks on the "Tokyo Express' m "The 

Slot'. Be with the 1st Marines and American Division 

along IhaTenaru. 



MALADANTHE NVADER 



You alone, Krysiga, have Itie polillcal and military 

savvy to lorm Ihe Alliance and lead into battle the legions 

of Ihe nine fuedal Lords. Slam-bang medieval combal. 

Nevsrplay the ssme gams iHite. Packdd with Hiswticsl fid 

Send Chech or money order lo: 

JACK 0' ROSES 

P,0. BOX 144, MIDDLETOWN, PA 17057 

{717)944-5843 

(Coinno<3oreisar&g.TM[j(CDrrm«)Ore Business MactiiHes.liC-WTo are ilOt 

respon^bifi for r^ 3.^i:gi^ wfh Ihe sppl<Lai:{)n 0' ihis soHware ) 



Go against the grain. 
Cut down on salt. 



*« 



Adding salt to your 
food could subtract 
years from your life. 
Because in some 
people salt contrib- 
utes to high blood pressure, a 
condition that increases your 
risk of heart disease. 



Cv American Heart Association 



circle Reader Service Number 223 



JULY 1992 COMPUTE G-17 



BEGINNER BASIC 



Larry Cotton 



Joyslick ports are 

usually input 

devices that receive 

data. Here's an 

easy way to reverse 

tlial flow. 



JOYSTICK OUTPUT 

As we all know, the ubiquitous 
joystick has been around al- 
most as long as the comput- 
er. When plugged into one of 
the 64's two joystick ports, it be- 
comes an input device, trans- 
lating hand movement to input 
the computer can use. 

Few people know that joy- 
stick ports can also be used 
for output. Perusing the Pro- 
grammer's Reference Guide. 
I noticed two little-mentioned 
memory registers — 56322 and 
56323— known as Data Direc- 
tion Registers (DDR) for ports 



a 17, bits and 4 will be set 
tor output. {All the rest will be 
at 0, for input.) Thus, one can 
independently control each of 
a particular joystick port's 
lines. It happens that bit 4 of 
56323 controls port 1 's fire but- 
ton line. 

How can we put this knowl- 
edge to use? Let's do a little 
work with some hardware. Lo- 
cate a discarded joystick and 
remove its cable. If you don't 
have one. Radio Shack sells a 
connector {catalogue number 
276-1538), but you'll have to 
wire it yourself. 

Most joysticks use six wires 






To 
Orange -*- 
Wire 



'LED 



'Shorter Lead 



150-220 ii 
Resistor 



To 
-•►Black 
Wire 



A and B. These are ports 2 
and 1, respectively, as la- 
beled on the computer. 

These two registers, when 
properly programmed, have 
the ability to change a joystick 
ports' direction of data flow 
from input to output! Address 

56322 controls joystick port 
2's memory register 56320; 

56323 controls port 1's regis- 
ter at 56321 . They behave sim- 
ilarly to the DDR at 56579, 
which determines whether the 
user port lines at 56577 are 
set for input or output. 

Each memory register in 
the 64 contains one byte, or 
eight bits. Those bits {num- 
bered through 7) can be con- 
trolled independently from BA- 
SIC with the Poke command. 

If you poke memory register 
56323 with a 1, for instance, 
bit will contain 1 ; it will be set 
for output. If you poke it with 



within the cable: the ground, 
the four direction lines (up, 
down, right, left), and the fire 
button. The fire button wire is 
usually orange, and the 
ground wire is usually black. 

Select these two wires and 
join them with an LED and a re- 
sistor, as shown above, Con- 
nect the shorter lead of an 
LED to either end of a 150- 
220-ohm resistor and the long- 
er lead to the orange fire but- 
ton wire. Complete the circuit 
by attaching the free end of 
the resistor to the black 
ground wire. 

If you don't happen to have 
LEDs at home, try Radio 
Shack's super-bright LED, cat- 
alogue number 276-087. 

Now enter the following. 

10 NT=9DO:FT=300:B=3: REM ON 
TIME, OFF TIME, AND NUMBER 
OF BLINKS 



2D P0KE56323,17: REM FIRE 
BUnON OUTPUT, DISABLES 
KEYBOARD, TURNS LED OFF 

30 FORT=1T0FT:NEXT 

40 F0RI=1T0B 

50P0KE56321,16 

60 F0RT=1T0NT:NEXT 

70POKE56321,0 

80 F0RT=1T0FT:NEXT 

90 NEXT 

100 P0KE56323,0: REM 
RESTORE TO NORMAL 

Save the program to disk be- 
fore going any further! 

Memory register 56323 nor- 
mally contains a 0. Because 
of the way the 64's keyboard 
is wired, poking values to 
that register will interfere with 
the keyboard's normal opera- 
tion. To try this, poke a 1 to 
56323. 

Turn your computer off and 
on again to restore keyboard 
operation. Plug the joystick ca- 
ble into port 1. (That's the 
port closest to you.) Load and 
run the above program. The 
LED should blink three times 
and possibly will glow softly af- 
terwards. The LED turns off 
completely when the line is 
changed to output. 

Line 10 defines the con- 
stants NT FT, and B for LED 
on-time, off-time, and number 
of blinks. Try changing these 
values. Line 20 pokes the 
DDR with a 17, which disa- 
bles the keyboard and chang- 
es the fire button line to out- 
put. Poking a 16 works also 
but leaves the cursor in a 
strange place. 

Lines 30, 60, and 80 con- 
trol the times the. LED is on or 
off. Line 40 begins a FOR- 
NEXT loop for the number of 
blinks; line 90 ends it. Lines 
50 and 70 turn the fire button 
wire on (positive DC voltage) 
and off (ground potential), re- 
spectively. Line 100 restores 
port 1 to normal operation. 

We'll look at more useful ap- 
plications next month and 
learn how to control small elec- 
trical appliances. □ 



G-18 COMPUTE JULY 1992 



GRAPEVINE GROUP- , 

Inc. CF 
COMMODORE UPGRADES 



I A super-heavy. tepairaDle C-64 power sup- 
pfy with an output of 4 3 amps {XhaV^ owff 3)c 
as poweHul as the original} Ffiatunrg i yfear 
waj-ranty, ext lus&, scfierrraiics. JL approwed 
Cost IS J37.95 3fid includes as a bonus the 
Commoflaie Diagnostician I F ( */alued &■ SE3i) 

• 1 3a(tipsup[jiyforCl2B Saneieaturesas 
J> above— J39.B5 (mciucJes bonus paWage) 

* Oar ll|gnl S(ll«r • 1 8 amp rspanatJie tisvy 
duty SLMi/ Iw C-64 IOve(1?OOOOH!d| ..«i95 

Repair y-our own CcmmodOre'Amigai and save 
lots of money Kits contain aH major chips. 
schematics, diagnostics, ere Mo soldering 
Send lor lull details. Five Qiflerent hits 
available 

Supei 1750 RED CLone |51!K) Dos noi 

require a larger power supply St4Z.SQ 

■ OnjnalMU-UMSlJK tiparderUul ... (131-10 

^*mM Hill:IH.'hk-»NM:ilM 

Driginally cJevc'L^':-.: .i:- .i a.![/.ue pac'^Qt; 
then convertM to a reaaabic lormai, ihn' 
Diagnosiician has Oecome a faniashc seier 
With over 38. 000 iold wcfldwide. Diagnosti- 
cian M utilises sophisticated c:ossTelerBnce 
grids to bcate laully componefiis {ICs) on all 
C-64 andCIS^] compuiefs (C-1?6M mode) 
Save mofiey and downtime by prompiSy locai- 
mgwhai chip! s) have tailed (No equipment ol 
aniy kinti needed ) Success rate Item diagnosis- 
larepair is %%. Includes basic sctiemanc {fi.S& 
I lAvaii ivAmQacanpgie^wittiS'^i'^o^jiIMSS I 



• COMPUTEft SAVER This C-G-l Protection 
System saves yoj costly repairs Ovef 5?% o( 
C-64 laiJures are caused by malfunctioning 
power supplies that cjesiroy your compute: 
Installs m seconds between power supply & 
C-B-l Nd solderfofl 2 year warranty An 
absoliite musi and gmat seller Si 7.95 

• PHINTER PORT ADAPTER by Qmnitfonix 
Auoid obsolescence. Allows yoti to use a:ny 
Commodore (C-64) printer on aay PC tompaii- 
We cr clone Does not work with 
Amiga 134.95 



Save lime and morey oy having your fiw3 
worn-out or damaged pnnihead ieljfti.i£he<)or 
remanufaciured at i Ificiloncf liie cost of anew 
one Features low cost 5 day service and l 
ye^r warranty For example Okidala BO/SQ/ 
too heads are S64 95, Epson (9 Pin) EX>FX/ 
LXareS69,95 



REPLACEHEMT/UPOBftDE 
CHIPS S PABTS 



6510 CPU 

65J6CIA jfA . 

65B1 SID .alt*.. 



E567 VidM . 



,s5S* 




III 

EACH 



VISA 



We Ship VVprMwide 



PL* 9061 U 

AII801/2JS6 7-9 

<t6<(C64(RAMl ea 

C-T28 ROMs Upgraoe Isel 3) Z4.95 

C1571 flOM UpsraUepiOBSil-OS) .. JtO-95 

C-64 Keytioard fne*| , ,.., 19.95 

Commcflote Caoles Call 

Service Manuals lor C64, C126, tB02 

1084, 1541 M1.9S 

Send for Free 3G Page Catalog 

3 CHESTNUT ST , SUFFERN. NV 1090T 
OtOei Line i ■aoO-232-mi Fan 914-357-6243 

Houis 9-6 E S T F,1-F 914-357-2424 Prices sub;ect 10 etiange 



Tell a friend you 'rp heard it through the Grapevine. 



Big Blue Reader 128/64 - 4.0 

Transfers word processing, text, ASCII, and binary files between 
C64/123 and IBM PC compatible 360K 5.25- and 720K 3.5" disl^s. 
New Version 4.0 features: Transfers ASCII, PET ASCII and Screen 
Code files including: WordWfiter, Pocl(etWfiler, SpeedScript, PaperClip, 
WriteStutf, GEOS, EasyScript, Fleet System and most others. 
Supports drives # 8-30. New Backup (C128) and Format (1571/1581) 
programs. Reads MS-DOS sub-directories, uses joyslici^, and more. 
Includes C64 & CI 28 programs. Requires 1571 or 1581 Disk Drive. 

Big Blue Reader 128/64 - 4.0 otily $44.95 

Version 4.0 upgrade, send original BBR disk plus $18. 



"SiBfe Search 52 

1. Entire Old and New Testament text on 4-1541/71 or 2-1581 disks. 

2. Exhaustive English Corvcordance on 2-1 541/71 orl-1581 disks; 
includes more than 700,000-4- references. 

3. Incredible five (5) second look-up time per/word, per/disk. 

4. Instant, automatic spell checking of more than 12,800 words. 

5. Boolean search options, including AND, OR & NOT logic. 

6. Searclv the entire Bible in 5 seconds with 1581 or HD (v3.52). 

7. Money Back Guaranteed! 

Includes: C64 & CI 28 programs: printer and disk output: users 
guide, disk case. Available on (7) 1541/71, or (4) 1581 disks. 

KJV $49.95 iV^tV^^tV NIV $59.95 

es" Any questions? Call or write for more information. 
Also available! Amiga, Bible Search 



Order by check, money order, or COD. US funds only. 

«■ FREE shipping in US . Wo Credit Card orders. 

Canada & Mexico add $4 S/H, Overseas add $10 S/H ($5 BBR) 

SOGWAP Software ^ (219)724-3900 

115 Bellnnont Road; Decatur, Indiana 46733 



Circle Reader Service Numl)er US 



Upgrade your Commodore system 



RaturblshBd Hardwara 

MONn'OBS DRIVES OTHER 

ir01-M35 1541-1100 )GSO-WO 

170J-JS55 1M1-II-(1S0 t67Ci-S50 

1801 -tZGS 1S71-S16S cu-sicn 

1S0:<S2S5 157MI-S1S5 UC-SIK 

1801-J295 IMI-SlM C1S8-S17S 

ie02-t305 1001SF0-S1S0 C128D-S22S 

1084i-i32S ISaoCATASHTE-taS 

MANY BOOKS -110 SOFTWARE -»10-I0 

ASKFORANYTHIHa. IMaHTHAVEITI 



NewAPROTEK modems 

Mn2e/AMIGA-2400 BAUD -tl 19 
64/1 Za/AMISA-1 200 BAUD - (S9 
APROSAhlD-4 SLOT CARTRIDGE 
EXPANDER FORTH£64/12S. 140 

New CMD accessories 

JIFFY DOS 64,128 SANYDRIVE "SYSTEM-- M5 

12eD.-ANY DRIVE -SYSTEM- - S95 

ADOIT lOMAL DRIVE ROMS - 145 

RAMU NK/RAUCAHD C(W BATTERY (0)Jb| - W45 

1 Ub FIAH SIMM ■ 175 4Mb RAM SIMM . $250 



J. P. P6M PRODUCTS BY MAIL shippin<>includedforcanad«,usa4-is% 

P.O. BOX « -1 233, STATION B 15 DAY WARRANTY ON REFURBISHED GOODS 

WESTON, ONTARIO, M9UB9 TAX-Canjds4.7%GST.On»r(oHee...8%PST 



Commodore 64 Public Domain 



Highest Quality Since 19B7' 

Games, Education, Business, Utilities, GEOS, Music, Grapfiics & 
More, As low as 90t per collection. 1 stamp for complete catalog 
or $2.00 for catalog AND 30 sample programs (refundable). 
24 hour shipping. 



64 DISK CONNECTION 



4291 Holland Rd., Suite 562 • Virginia Beach, VA 23452 
(* Formerly HVH Putilications) 



Circle Reader Service Number 254 







Realistic Nuclear Attack Sub Simulalion 

CM or 120 In 64 MorJo 
Comrrand Missons UrOQr The Arctic Ice 
Hunl RuBscn TyphooME In The North Sea 

Requires CS4 G60S 1.3 or 2.0 
S19.95 Check or Money Order 
VMC Software PO Box 326 
Cambria His. NY 11411 



was 



Circle Reader Service Numt)er 171 





Can Your 
^ Computer Make 

A\<iD) YOU 

S; $1,000,000? 

1' WITH LOnERY PC YOUR NEXT TICKET 
COULD BE WORTH MILLIONS! 

LOTTERY uses the raw power and storage of your 
computer 10 delermine and refine the numljer selection 
meitwds that will *in itie various lottery sames you 
play Don't be limited to Itie one or iwo meitiods thai 
oltier piograms use. itiey migtii noi work in your stale. 
Ttieie IS no belter system a«ailat)le' 

Join the growing list ot winners using ouj system. 

SPECIFY: 
Lottery 64(C64/1 28) 

Lottery PC 
IBIVI PC/XT/AT and compatibles 

Comiii0doie64/1 28 i Plus/4 are registered 

trademarKs ol Commodore Int 

ISM PC/XT/AT are registered Itademarks ol 

Inlernalionai Business Machines Inc 



To onter. send $29 95 tor each plus S3.00 postage £ 

handling per order to 

(liiinois residents add ^% sales tail 

jGrdeis outside North America add S3.00) 




Circle Reader Service Number 221 



MACHINE LANGUAGE 



Jim Butterfield 



The stack takes care 
of itself so well 

that it often remains 

a mystery 

to programmers. 



SIMPLE STACK 
USAGE 

The stack is used automatical- 
ly by many activities. When 
your program calls a subrou- 
tine with JSR, the stack stores 
the return address. Later, the 
subroutine returns with RTS, 
and the stack delivers the 
stored address. Similar ac- 
tions take place with RTI and 
interrupts. In every case, the 
stack is returned to its former 
condition automatically when 
the job is done. 

The stack takes care of it- 
self so well that it often re- 
mains a mystery to program- 
mers. Since they don't often 
use the four stack-manipula- 
tion commands, programmers 
feel ill at ease with them. Here 
are those commands. 

PHA Push (copy) the con- 
tents of A to the stack. 

PLA Pull the contents of the 
stack into A. 

PHP Push (copy) the PSW 
(program status word) to the 
stack. 

PLP Pull the contents of the 
stack into the PSW. 

Using these commands is sim- 
ple. Do you have something in 
the A register that you know 
you will need soon but not 
right now? Push it to the stack 
with PHA. You can store it 
there for a while then bring it 
back later with PLA. Perhaps 
you have a condition flag that 
you'll want to test later in the 
program but not immediately? 
Push all the flags with PHP 
and bring them back with PLP 
when you want to test them. 
There's only one vital rule 
that you must follow: If you put 
it on the stack, you must take 
it off. Leave a messy stack, 
and your program will crack. 
The last thing that you pushed 



onto the stack is the first thing 
you must pull. After you push 
something to the stack, be 
very careful that your code nev- 
er branches away, leaving a 
bad stack in place. 

Let's write a small but use- 
ful program that uses the 
stack commands. It's a pro- 
gram to print the contents of a 
sequential file to the screen or 
to a printer. 

The program will connect to 
the input file, take a byte, and 
disconnect. It will then con- 
nect to the output file, send 
that byte, and again discon- 
nect. Then it will test to see if 
the input has signaled end-of- 
file (EOF). If not, back we go 
to do it all again. 

The EOF condition is signal- 
ed in variable ST (status), ad- 
dress $90 on current Commo- 
dore 8-bit machines. But 
here's the catch: It's signaled 
immediately following the in- 
put operation. If you examine 
the logic flow described 
above, you'll see that we test 
for EOF after we've performed 
an output operation. That's the 
right program point to do the 
test, but by that time, variable 
ST will have lost the vital EOF 
signal that v/as present after 
the program performed the in- 
put operation. 

That means we should test 
the value of ST immediately af- 
ter the input but we shouldn't 
branch based upon that test 
until a later program point. 
How may we preserve the con- 
dition flags? We do it with the 
PHP and PLP instructions. 

A second problem arises. 
We read a byte from our input 
tile by means of a call to the 
Kernal subroutine at $FFE4. 
The value is placed into reg- 
ister A, which is just where 
we'll want it for output. Our 
next call, however, is to 
$FFGC in order to disconnect 
from the input stream, and 
that will destroy the contents 
of the A register. The easiest 
solution is to preserve A with 



the PHA and PLA instructions. 
Gosh, this is easy. Let's go to 
the code. 

Logical file 1 will have been 
opened as our input: logical 
file 2 as our output. First, let's 
connect to the input stream. 

2DD0 A2 01 LDX #SD1 ; 

laglcal file 1 
20D2 20 C6 FF JSR SFFC6 ; 

connect input 
2DD5 20 E4 FF JSR SFFE4 ; 

input a byte 

Now we test ST, address 
90. A value of means that 
we aren't at EOF and there 
are no other problems. Load- 
ing ST into the Y register will 
automatically set the Z flag if 
the value is 0: otherwise, the 
2 flag will be cleared. Either 
way, we'll push the flag to the 
stack and test it later. 

2QDB A4 90 Lt)Y $90 ; 

read ST (Z flag) 
200A 08 PHP ; 

save conditions to stack 

The byte we received from 
the input stream is stil! in the 
A register. But we're about to 
make a couple of calls that 
will wipe it out. So let's put 
that on the stack, too. Remem- 
ber that since it's the most re- 
cent thing we've put on the 
stack, it must be the first 
thing we pull. 

200B 48 PHA ; 

save input byte 

Now that the byte is safely 
stacked, we can disconnect 
our input. 

200C 20 CC FF JSR SFFCC ; 
restore default I/O 

Then we connect to our out- 
put stream, logical file 2. 

200F A2 02 LDX #$02 ; 

logical file 2 
2011 20 eg FF JSR $FFCg ; 

connect output stream 



G-20 COMPUTE JULY 1992 



SOFTWARE CLOSEOUTS 

For commodore 64 & 128 


SIMTHiiCSIMUUTlOKSINC.ISSII SIlfflEKH 

Typhoon o( steel. Wa r ol the Lance. Curse ot 
Azjre Bonds. Pool ot Rafl lance. Countdown to 
Doomsday. Battles ol Napoleon, Tony URussa 
Baseball. B-24, Roadiv3r2000.Hillsfar. Firs! 
over Germany. Heroes of Lance. Pro-Tour Golf, 
Battle for Normandy. Dragons o1 Flame or 
Dragonstnke. 

HUSOfflOSEilllumHY ,. SliSOEACH 

Aerojet. Destroyer Escort, Nettierivorld. Ricli 
Dangerous. TopGunner.XencphotM.CrusarJein 
Europe, Decision in the Desert. Splttire Ace. 
HellcatAce.SoloFllgm.SilentService.Conllict 
in Vietnam. Stunt Track Racer. 3D Pool, f-15 
SIrllieEagle.AirBorne Ranger, or Pirates! 

Ai:COUDE BAHGAINS R.OIEACH 


AUALOHHiaGAMEiaMPAHT iimim 

Under Fire, P/acBelh, Wooden ShipsS Iron Men. 
Ripperl. Tsushima. Stocks & Bonds. Dr Ruth, 
ParltiianKirtgs.Jupiler Mission 1999.T.A,C., 
Legionnaire, TournamemGolf, Maxviell Manor, 
StatiS'Pro Baseball. Gull Strike. Darkhorn, 
Guderian,MissiononTnun(Jerlie3d.PanzersEasI. 
SuperSunrfay. 01 Panzer Jagd- 

WFOCOMBARGAIKS $5.00 EACH 

Starcross. Suspended,Zork2or3. or Deadline, 

MMEtatEArDEAlSJIIIII 

PrintedWordoiTheTool.byValueware S2.75 

Partner 128 |cartridgetorC/1 25 only), 

byTimEVjorks S17.50 

(ilBsltnferllS.tfHeswanpZSonV!! .{14.50 

ScpeiEij3nder&!(canndg>).byComrtBdorB S5.0I) 

Assembler.byCommodorc S5.00 

PetEmulator.byCommodore S9,50 

Entertaineror Educator, byValueware „,.S3.75 

Tii-MathmTuftleToyland.tiyHesWare M.50 

Afckclih!WuaitCaniels|cartri088|,tivHESS3-50 
Eioclronlc Zoo J16.50EACH 


PSI 5 Trading Co.. Lavs ot the West. Comics, 
KliledU ntl 1 Deao. HarflOall. Dambusters, Aceol 
Aces, Fight Night, or Jel Boys. 

TArTOiiREHIUHTmiS tUMEACH 

Alcon. Aflianold.AriQnoid II. Bubble Bobble, Qu, 
Operation WoK, Rambol U , Rastan or Renegade. 

ACTIVISfON BSBSAINS SS.DO EACH 


lronLord.Puft>'sSaga,SkateWars,B,AT„Plck'NPk! 
Chossmast8r2100,ljySo1hrarsToolwortsS14.50 
Dragon IVais-or-Nsuromancer, Interplay. ..S18.5D 
Heatwave-or-SleelThunder, Accolade.. .$16.50 
IONS 1)1 M)I1III11N,\I. ITEMS KOR 
r()MM()I)()RF:f>Ji:N...lVSI(M'KNOW: 
(■AI,l,(N(15)544-<iAr6r(»rHKCK 1 IT1.F..S 


ToyBrzarre, Mindshadow.HE.F^.O.. Crossbow 
Championship Baseball, Zenji or Powerdrlft, 

ACmStONPREHItlMTlTLES SliMEACH 

Gee Bee Air Rally, Aliens, Ghaslbuslers II 
Maniac Mansion. Beyond DarkCastle.Titanic, 
Space Shuttle. Christmas Model Kit. Mo ndu's 
Fight Palace, or Die Hard, 

FUBSCAFEUOUMiai flaEAOl 

Maslertype/Writer Bundle. Perfect Score SAT, 
Shinobi, Gauntlet 2. Bop 'n Rumble. ColorMe. 
Combat Course. IntotheEagle'sNest. Indoor 
Sports, Boston Computer Diet, Songwriter, 
Thunderblade, Golden Oldies. 


VISAJMC ORDERS CALL TOLL-FREE 

1-800-676-6616 

Credit Card DnSers Only ! ! ! ! ($25 miftimum) 


TO ORDER Serid cfieck cr money oitieT. including 
shipping cn^rges Di S5 for U,S.A , SBforCanatfa SI 2 all 
Oih^iS Calilo^nij atJdressesmusl include 7 25'd sa!es 
tin Tq receive our campleie catalog olover ?.000i!«i^S 
!or all cnmpner tvp«s. send $2 m casi or postage 
sumps 7hecjtalog«sFREE'A!lhaiTrfOrtJer TuchecXtor 
an ilEH nol hsttdheie.cali (SOS) 544-661 S. 


COMPSULT 

P.O. BOX 5160 

SAN LUIS OBISPO 

CA 93403-5160 


WE ALSO CARRY LOTS Of 

SOFTWARE FOR IBM. APPLE, MAC, 

AMIGA, ATARE& MORE! 



un Eraptiics [HaEtiinE 

FLH GRBPHICS (IlflCHIHE (FGffl) IS AH "flLL- 1 H-DNE:" GRflPHICS 
PBOGRflffl FOR THE C=6M, lUHHT CRK BE CREfiTED UIITH FDffl IS 
OHLV LimiTEO BV VOUR IIIIflE I KRT I ON, JUST fl FEIU EXRmPLES: 




1 



BUSIHESS i:FiRDS 

CUSTOn URBELS 

UmEQ TITLING 

NEUISLETTEBS 

CRLEtiDHRS 



OlflGRflltS 
POSTERS 



SIGNS 

CHECKS 

OUERLRVS 

BRDCHUFICS 

LETTCRHEODS 



SUPPORTS 

FILL 

ICmO DRIUES 

FUH GRBPHICS (IinCHINE SUPPORTS IIIIPORTtMG GRflPHICS FIND 
Ht-R£S SCREENS FROffl iTlflHV POPULAR PROGflflmS INCLUDING! 



cEHTtrrcBTEs 

SRCCTtNG CURDS 
QISK ENUELQPES 





THIS flO 
CRERTEO 
IDITH FGffl 



KORLD handv:i:r)hner si 

CCOPHIHT COMPUTER EVES 

RUHPBI NT PRIMTHRSTER 

PRINT SHOP NEIXlSROOn 

HOU OCP RRT SCdUlRITC 

UtDEO 8VTE II DOODLE ^^ ^^ 

GEQS"~SCREENS CflH BE CBPTURED SIIIIPLV BV RESETTING 
COttlPUTER THEN LOHDINC THE FUN GRflPHICS lUflCHIHE, 

FGdl CLIP HUT U0L.1 OtlER 200 CKCELLEHT OBSPMICS- «8.00 

FGm FOHT DISX ouer 30 rortTS IK FCH eobhrt «5i00 

C = 64 KEVBDflRD TEmPLRTE: HAKE vouR OWH OUERLflVS-- *5.00 
C=1Z8 KEV80RRD TEfflPLflTE "RKE vOUfl OWN OUERLfiVS- JS.OO 
FGm CHLEHDflR TEmPLRTES DfllLV, '""_ii'-_^j__"j|^_^_"_'-_''_V _^^^^^ 
"sVuLlVEvVoVRDVuVBrflVs'FOR'THE FOLLOWmG PBOGHflmS S 
Sa CnlD'S HARD ORIliE, RfllllLIHK, RflmDRlUE JIFFV DOS CDrtlfflflNDS 
[Ma SMRP SHOT 5 [=11 flCTIOH HEPLflV 4 * 5 [=3 EPVX FAST LORD 
[=3 BUSINESS FORlll SHOP [MI CflLC (SL STAR BASIC kn ["f| 
C»l ROCK'S ASSEtHaLER [sa THE FUN GRAPHICS fflflCHIHE idOU'^" 

PLEASE STATE COtlPUTER [C64 , C 1 28 . SX -641 OR C6M IS SHIPPED 

""This FGM Coimecttoii 
^^ P.a Box 220G 
Rosebiirg, OR. 97470 

(5031-673-2234 
^ ADD S3.S0 FOR S/H PER ORDER 

!|| IF OmV ORDERING OUEflLRVS THEN S/H IS 12,00 PER ORPER 





1 



Circle Reader Service Numtjer 161 



Now that we've connected, ] 
we're ready to output. All we 
have to do is pull the data 
byte back and send it. 

2014 68 PLA 
; restore input byte 

2015 20 D2 FF JSR $FFD2 
; output It 



We've used the Kernal sub- 
routine at SFFCC before, to 
disconnect the input 
stream. Now we use it to dis- 
connect the output stream. 

201 a 20 CC FF JSR SFFCC 
; restore default I/O 

Now the program is ready 
to test for EOF. Let's bring 
back the Z flag that we 
stashed quite a while ago. 

201B 28 PLP 

; restore condition flags 

201C FO E2 BEQ $2000 

; If not EOF, do it again 

2D1E BO RTS 

; else back to BASIC 

The BASIC code pokes the 
machine language code in 



place, opens the input and 
output files, and then calls 
the machine language with 
a SYS command. When the 
IVIL program returns control, 
BASIC closes the two files. 
This example of stack us- 
age runs on all recent Com- 
modore 8-bit computers. To 
run this program on the old- 
er CBM and PET comput- 
ers, change the value 144 
to 150 in line 100 and the val- 
ue 4388 to 4396 in line 250. 

100 DATA 162,1,32,198,255, 

32,228,255,164,144,8, 

72,32,204,255 
110 DATA 162,2,32,201,255, 

104,32,210,255, 

32,204,255,40,240, 

22S,3S 
200 FOR J=8192T0 8222 
210 READX 
220 POKE J,X 
230 T=T-fX 
240 NEXT J 

250 IF T<>43B8 THEN STOP 
300 INPUT "NAME OF INPUT 

FILE";FS 
310 OPEN 15,8,15 
320 0PEN1,8,3,FS 
330 INPUT#15.E,E$,E1,£2 



340 IF EoO THEN PRINT 


380 IF DS="P" 


THEN A=4:G0T0 


E;E$;E1;E2:ST0P 


400 




350 INPUT "OUTPUT TO 


390 GOTO 350 




SCREEN OR PRINTER";D5 


400 OPEN 2,A 




360 D$=LEFT$(D$,1) 


410 SYS 8192 




370 IF D$="S" THEN 


420 CLOSE 2 




A=3:G0T0 400 


430 CLOSE 1 


□ 



TYPING AIDS 

MLX, our machine language entry program for the 64 
and 128, and The Automatic Proofreader are utilities 
that help you type in Gazette programs without nnak- 
ing mistakes. To make room for more programs, we no 
longer include these labor-saving utilities in every is- 
sue, but they can be found on each Gazefte Disk and 
are printed in all issues of Gazefte through June 1990. 

If you don't have access to a back issue or to one 
of our disks, write to us, and we'll send you free print- 
ed copies of both of these handy programs for you to 
type in. We'll also include instructions on how to type 
in Gazette programs. Please enclose a self-addressed, 
stamped envelope. Send a self-addressed disk mail- 
er with appropriate postage to receive these programs 
on disk. 

Write to Typing Aids, COMPUTE's Gazette, 324 
West Wendover Avenue, Suite 200, Greensboro, 
North Carolina 27408. 



JULY 1992 COMPUTE G-21 



GEOS 



Steve Vander Ark 



The GEOS deskTop Is 

a very efficient 

program, but it lias 

Its faults. Here's 

a lool< at some deskTop 

alternatives. 



IN SEARCH OF 
A BETTER DESKTOP 

Which GEOS application do 
you use the most? You might 
thinl< it's geoWrite. but it's the 
deskTop. The deskTop lets 
you erase and copy files, 
page through disk directories, 
and load and run applications. 
The deskTop is like home 
base — where you go when 
you click on Quit. 

Whenever you hit a quit but- 
ton, GEOS looks for and runs 
the file called DESKTOP. Ob- 
viously, it wouldn't do to have 
an unsuspecting user rename 
. his or her deskTop. That's why 
it's invisible to the system and 
why it isn't called an applica- 
tion in its info box. It's a GEOS 
system file 4, which is a file 
type you can't rename. 

The deskTop, especially 
the 2.0 version, is very effi- 
cient, but it has some faults. 
Moving from page to page on 
the notepad, for example, is a 
fairly slow process, since the 
system must load each page 
and its icons separately. Also, 
the deskTop provides only 
marginal support for a third 
disk drive and until recently 
provided none at all for devic- 
es such as CMD's RAMLink. 

Over the years, program- 
mers have created several dif- 
ferent fiie-handling applica- 
tions to supplement the desk- 
Top. These programs buy 
speed by using text instead of 
icons to list files. Most of them 
patch the GEOS system with 
a different filename so that a 
Quit command returns you to 
them instead of the deskTop. 
Here's a list of such programs. 

DualTop. DualTop, as its 
name implies, does the desk- 
Top one better by displaying 
the directories of two disks 
side by side. Standard file func- 
tions are accomplished by 
highlighting the filename and 
then clicking on one of the but- 
tons on the screen. DualTop 



supports three drives, includ- 
ing RAM drives. 

On Q-Link. the 128 version 
is called 128DTV27.SFX, 
uploaded by RedSonia. DUAL- 
TOP is the 64 version, upload- 
ed by JBUS. 

WormDesk. This program 
provides all normal file func- 
tions, as well as an elaborate 
view system. The directory dis- 
played can consist of only one 
type of file at a time. This usu- 
ally is fine, but once in a while 
it's nice to be able to peruse 
an entire directory, an option 
not available on WormDesk. 

The Q-Link filename is 
WORMDESK5.0, uploaded by 
geoWorm. It's for the 64 only. 

QwikTop. The QwikTop 
screen is divided into eight box- 
es, each of which displays the 
files from a single page of the 
deskTop's notepad. The result 
is that you get to see seven 
pages at once, plus the bor- 
der, with filenames shown in 
text. QwikTop saves space by 
including only the most often- 
used tile functions, but the 
fact that you can view most of 
a disk's files at once and 
move them around from page 
to page almost instantly 
makes this one a joy for those 
of us who like to organize our 
disks. This one's a winner! 

Q-Link filenames are 
QWIKTOP uploaded by IL- 
LINI70. and QWIKTOP128.2, 
uploaded by GEOREP JIM. 

Mini-Desk. This Jim Gollette 
masterpiece is a desk acces- 
sory which provides access to 
a few essential file-handling op- 
tions while you're within anoth- 
er application. I find this nifty 
program especially helpful 
when I'm working on a project 
where the application and the 
document are both in RAM. 
Mini-Desk lets me copy the 
file I'm working on to another 
drive, assuring me of a current 
copy even if the power fails. 

Released as part of Comm- 
Plex Software's GeoWizard 
disk, the entire package is 



$16.95 from CommPlex Soft- 
ware, 6782 Junction Road, Pa- 
vilion, New York 14525. 

Switcher. To avoid the de- 
lay while one application quits 
to the deskTop and another 
one loads. Switcher avoids the 
deskTop and provides a dia- 
log box from which to open 
the next application. This isn't 
really a full-fledged deskTop re- 
placement, but if your work re- 
quires moving from program 
to program, Switcher will cer- 
tainly keep you jumping. Its 
very small size makes it a 
boon for single-drive geoPub- 
lish users. Its Q-Link filename 
is SWITCHER 1.3, uploaded 
by Student t. 

gateWay. GateWay is more 
than a deskTop alternate. It's 
a full-blooded replacement 
with lots of great features. Un- 
til recently, gateWay was the 
only file-handling system 
which supported CMD's RAM- 
Link and f^AMDrive. For more 
information, see the Gazette re- 
view (November 1991). 

Gateway ($29.95) is availa- 
ble in 64 and 128 versions 
from Creative Micro Designs, 
PO. Box 646, East Longmead- 
ow, Massachusetts 01028. 

geoShelL GeoShell takes 
the GEOS environment full cir- 
cle, replacing the graphics in- 
terface of the deskTop with 
text commands. While this 
might seem to you like a step 
backwards, the many hot-key 
commands and the speed of 
this program might instead 
lead you to decide that it's the 
most efficient file-handling rou- 
tine around. For example, by 
typing the filename of a file on 
the current disk and pressing 
Return, geoShell quickly 
scans the directory and then 
loads and runs the file. 
There's no need to page 
through a slew of icons or 
scroll through a directory. 

For more information about 
geoShell, contact Maurice Ran- 
dall, 215 East Harris, Char- 
lotte, Michigan 48813. D 



G-22 COMPUTE JULY 1992 



The Gazette 

Productivity 

Manager 

(Formerly PowerPak) ^^ 

Harness the productivity 
power of your 64 or 128! 

Turn your Commodore into 
a powerful workhorse, keep track 
of finances, generate reports 
in a snap, manage your 
money in minutes- 
all with the new 1991 
Gazette Productivity 
Manager! Look at all 
your 64/128 Productivity 
Manager disk contains. 

GemCalc 64 & 128— 
A complete, powerful, user- 
friendly spreadsheet with all 
the features you'd expect 
in an expensive commercial package 
(separate 64 and 128 versions are included). 
Most commands can be performed with a single keypress! 

Memo Card — Unleashes the power of a full-blown 
database without the fuss! Nothing's easier — it's a 
truly simple computerized address file. Just type in 
your data on any one of the index cards. Need to edit? 
Just use the standard Commodore editing keys. 
Finished? Just save the data to floppy. What could be 
easier? 

Financial Planner — Answers all of those questions 
concerning interest, investments, and money manage- 
ment that financial analysts charge big bucks for! You 
can plan for your children's education and know 
exactly how much it will cost and how much you need 
to save every month to reach your goal. Or, decide 
whether to buy or lease a new car. Use the compound 
interest and savings function to arrive at accurate 
estimates of how your money will work for you. 
Compute the answer at the click of a key! 

DON'T MISS OUT ON THIS 
POWERFUL WORKHORSE! 




(MasterCard and Visa accepted on orders with subtotal over $20). 



I_l YES! Please send me Productivity Manager diskfa) 

($14.95 each). 

Subtotal 

Sales Tax (Residents of NC and NY please add appro- 
priate sales tax for your area. Canadian orders, add 
7% goods and services tax.) 

Shipping and Handling (S2.00 U.S. and Canada, S3.00 

surface mail, $5.00 airmail per disk.) 

Total Enclosed 

_ Check or Money Order _ MasterCard _ VISA 



Crrdll C«r£ »a. , 



{Rtquirtd) 






Provlnci 



UP/ 
- Fulal Cudc 



Send your order to Gazette 1991 Productivity Manager, 
324 W. Wendover Ave., Ste. 200, Greensboro, NC 27408. 



DIVERSIONS 



Fred D'Ignazio 



Don't let death act 

as an obstacle 

to your future. Use 

multimedia as 

a springboard to 

immortality. 



DIGITAL 
IMMORTALITY 

When i was a child, I used to 
think I was immortal. I couldn't 
die. This type of attitude natu- 
rally led to several life-threat- 
ening experiences, such as 
jumping off roofs, almost get- 
ting hit by cars, and climbing 
on cliffs. I concluded that my 
surviving these activities dem- 
onstrated my invulnerability. 

When I grew older and had 
experienced the deaths of my 
uncle, a favorite grandmother, 
and a few assorted movie 
stars and pets, I grew wiser. I 
realized that maybe I wasn't im- 
mortal. Maybe I could die. But, 
heck, 1 was young. Death was 
probably 50, 60, maybe 80 
years away. I was hopeful. 
Someone was bound to discov- 
er a cure for old age way be- 
fore I got close to dying. 

I clung to this notion of a 
fountain of youth for quite a 
few years, but now it's starting 
to dry up. It's getting harder to 
believe in medical miracles. 
I'm 43, and there doesn't 
seem to be a miracle drug on 
the horizon. In fact, things 
seem to be getting worse. 
With the upsurge in crime, vi- 
olence, AIDS, and so on, 1 feel 
far more at risk now than I did 
when I was younger. 

The other night I was watch- 
ing television, feeling kind of 
blue, and I spotted a commer- 
cial that features Elton John 
playing alongside Louis Arm- 
strong, Humphrey Bogart, and 
James Cagney. Through spe- 
cial digital techniques, movie 
images of these long-dead 
superstars have been added 
to a new ad that features a 
very much alive Elton John. 

The next night I tuned into 
the Grammy Awards and saw 
Natalie Cole win a Grammy for 
her song "Unforgettable." To 
create this version, she used 
digital techniques to weave 
her father's original song into 



a new recording in which the 
two of them sing a duet. Nat 
King Cole is dead, but that 
didn't stop his daughter from 
resurrecting his unforgettable 
solo and changing it into a 
hauntingly beautiful father- 
daughter masterpiece, 

Both of these instances qual- 
ify as digital immortality. I 
know that Cagney, Bogart, 
Cole, and Armstrong are 
dead, but I did see and hear 
them on television the other 
night in new productions. 

The Elton John commercial 
and the Natalie Cole song 
have been so successful that 
they're sure to spawn a host of 
imitations. Television compa- 
nies, movie houses, and ad 
agencies will search their ar- 
chives to resurrect film stars, 
political figures, authors, ath- 
letes, heroes, villains, and 
saints to mix their images with 
contemporary media figures. 
We'll soon be flooded with 
songs and commercials digi- 
tally combining the dead and 
the undead: f\/larilyn Monroe 
with Madonna, W. C. Fields 
with Danny DeVito, Lou 
Gehrig with Jose Canseco, 
Teddy Roosevelt with George 
Bush, Steve Martin with the 
Three Stooges. 

In fact, virtual immortality is 
nothing new, We've been get- 
ting accustomed to it for 
years. What's the effect of me- 
dia stars dying? If they're pop- 
ular, it doesn't mean that we 
no longer see them. All it 
means is that we don't get any 
new material. We still see re- 
runs of their best work. 

Are Sing Crosby and Dan- 
ny Kaye gone? It doesn't 
seem like it after I've watched 
White Christmas. What about 
Judy Garland? Not after see- 
ing Wizard of Oz with my three- 
year-old. How about Spencer 
Tracy, John F. Kennedy, or 
Jim Morrison? It's hard to imag- 
ine Lucille Ball gone after 
watching one of her wonderful 
"I Love Lucy" episodes. 



The truth is that my memory 
of a star's death pales in com- 
parison to the vivid, poignant 
evidence of his or her survival 
on the television or movie 
screen. The stars seem still 
alive when I see them in the 
midst of news programs, sit- 
coms, and commercials that 
feature the products and celeb- 
rities of the here and now. 

This brings me to my own 
death, or hopefully, my own vir- 
tual immortality. I may give up 
on cryogenics, miracle drugs, 
and fountains of youth, but I 
might still achieve immortality 
through multimedia. 

I can see a whole new indus- 
try springing up as funeral 
homes retrofit middle-aged 
and older Americans with dig- 
ital re-creations of their lives. 
They can interview us to cap- 
ture our voices and images. 
They can scan in photographs 
and digitize home movies and 
audio tapes to capture us dur- 
ing our youth and our adult- 
hood. They can embed us in 
the era in which we lived and 
put a spin on the whole pres- 
entation. How do we want to 
be remembered? Nostalgical- 
ly? Romantically? Dashingly? 
Respectfully? Producers at mul- 
timedia funeral homes will be 
able to remaster our lives digi- 
tally and dramatize them ac- 
cording to our wishes. 

"This Is Your Life, Fred D'Ig- 
nazio." That's what I'll get. !'il 
pay about a thousand dollars. 
It'll take only a couple of days 
to create at the local funeral 
home equivalent of a one- 
hour Insty-Prints or Moto-Pho- 
to. I'll be packaged on CD- 
ROM. I'll get a dozen copies 
to distribute to my wife, chil- 
dren, and close friends. When- 
ever they miss me or want to 
remember how 1 was, they'll 
boot up my disc in their com- 
puter, and I'll spring to life, 
just like Bogart, Armstrong, 
Cagney, and Cole. 

I'll be immortal, i won't no- 
tice, but others will. □ 



G-24 COMPUTE JULY 1992 



PROGRAMS 



POP-UP 



By Richard Penn 

While entering data for an applications 
program, you suddenly need to make a 
calculation. You press a key, call up a cal- 
culator screen, determine the answer 
that you need, and then continue with 
your main program. 

The telephone rings while you're work- 
ing on a report, and you need to check a 
date while discussing an appointment. 
You press a key, call up a calendar, and 
then return to your report. 

Afterward, prior to printing your report, 
you call up a smart help screen — one 
that knows you're ready to print and dis- 
plays only a summary of printer com- 
mands, not the ten previous pages of in- 
structions that you don't need. 

If you think this sounds like something 
only an expert programmer could do in 
machine language, you're wrong. Pop- 
Up allows you to add pop-up desk tools 
to BASIC programs as easily as writing a 
GOSUB subroutine, and it lets you call 
them with a single command! 

Typing It In 

Pop-Up consists of three programs. 
The first is the actual machine lan- 
guage routine, so you'll need to use 
MLX, our machine language entry pro- 
gram to enter it. See "Typing Aids" else- 
where in this section. When MLX 
prompts you, respond with the values 
given below. 

Starting address: COOO 
Ending address: C607 

Before exiting MLX, save a copy of 
this program with the name POP-UP. 
The enclosed demonstration program 
looks for that name when it runs. 

A second machine language pro- 
gram contains sprite data for an on- 
screen calculator that's used in the dem- 
onstration program. Again, you'll need 
MLX to type it in. When MLX prompts 
you, respond with the following values. 

Starting address: 3E00 
Ending address: 3FFF 

When you've finished typing, be sure 
to save a copy of the program as CAL- 
CULATOR. SPR. 

Finally, Demo is a BASIC program 



that shows how to use Pop-Up. To pre- 
vent typing errors, enter it with The 
Automatic Proofreader: see "Typing 
Aids" again elsewhere in this section. 

Put It to Work 

To use Pop-Up in your own applica- 
tions, add lines 30-40 of Demo to the 
beginning of your BASIC programs. 
Now let's take a look at how it works. 

Two Commands 

Pop-Up works by setting up a branch 
key. Whenever f1 is pressed, the run- 
ning BASIC program is suspended, 
and execution branches to a selected 
line. This subroutine, which runs inde- 
pendently with its own variables, con- 
tains the code for the pop-up tool. 
Pressing f1 again returns you to the 
main program without a hint that any- 
thing ever happened. Think of it as a 
powerful GOSIJB key that jumps to a 
subroutine with its own screen, VIC-II 
chip, and variables. 

There are only two commands to 
learn. The first, SYS 49752, line, ena- 
bles Pop-Up and selects the line to 
branch to. This command should be 
used at the beginning of your program. 
The second command, SYS 49877, dis- 
ables Pop-Up. 

Programming Desk Tools 

A BASIC routine for an accessory 
such as a calculator is practically no dif- 
ferent from any other subroutine, ex- 
cept that you must write it as a stand- 
alone program that loops endlessly. 
Think of an accessory as a new pro- 
gram that runs from the main program 
whenever you press f1. This new pro- 
gram continues until you press f1 
again to exit. You'll see a programming 
example of this by using a calculator in 
Demo. 

When you press f1, the machine lan- 
guage routines save all important infor- 
mation about the main program, such 
as BASIC pointers, screen and color 
memory the VIC-II chip, and variables. 
Then BASIC jumps to the subroutine se- 
lected by the SYS 49752, line com- 
mand and executes it, just as if RUN 
were typed. This subroutine has its 
own variables (2559 bytes stored at 
memory locations 50689-53247) that 
are cleared each time you press f1. 
The display, however, isn't cleared, so 



your pop-up tools can be printed over 
the current screen for a window effect. 
The only quirk is that the cursor is po- 
sitioned one column to the right of the 
home location whenever f1 is pressed 
the second time. 

No changes made to the screen or 
sprites by the subroutine called by Pop- 
Up are permanent. Pressing f1 again re- 
stores the original program and 
screen. The only exception is the SID 
chip, which cannot be peeked and 
therefore cannot be saved. 

More Than One 

What if you want several accessories? 
Include a menu at the beginning of the 
Pop-Up subroutine for the user to se- 
lect. You might include a calculator, cal- 
endar, and notepad, 

When programming Pop-Up tools, 
it's best to write them separately and 
then merge them with your main pro- 
gram once they're debugged. This Is 
because only the main set of variables 
is available to the BASIC editor. If you 
press Run/Stop while a Pop-Up subrou- 
tine is running and then type PRINT A, 
the value of A in the main program, not 
the subroutine, will be returned. 

Also, note that a renumbering utility 
won't recognize the new SYS 49752, 
line command. You'll have to change 
its line number yourself. 

Smart Help Screens 

Suppose you have a two-part program 
in which you first enter data and then 
print a report. Some programs offer a 
help key, and dumb help screens are 
always displayed in the same se- 
quence. That means users who need in- 
formation about printing but don't 
need help for entering data have to 
see the data-entry help screen anyway 
because it comes first. Smart help 
screens eliminate fiipping through un- 
wanted screens because they know 
where you are in a program and only 
display relevant information. 

Programming them with Pop-Up is 
easy. In our example program, you 
might insert the command POKE 679,1 
at the beginning of the data-entry rou- 
tine, and POKE 679,2 at the start of the 
report-printing routine. 

The help screen subroutine (called 
with f1) would check location 679 with 
a line such as IF PEEK(679)=1 THEN 

JULY 1992 COMPUTE G-25 



PROGRAMS 



2Q00 : REM PRINT DATA ENTRY 
HELP SCREEN. If it contained a 1, the 
data-entry fielp screen would be print- 
ed. If location 679 field a 2, thie pro- 
gram would jump to 3000 wfiere a re- 
port fielp screen would be displayed. 
For a longer program, just include 
more flags and fF/THEN statements. 

New Look and Feel 

Pop-Up gives BASIC a new look and 
feel. Never before could software writ- 
ten in BASiC be so user-friendly, nor 
did tlie BASIC programmer hiave so 
mucfi power at fiis fingertips. Tfie pos- 
sible click-on accessories are limited on- 
ly by your programming ability. 

Even if you don't want to program 
your own accessories, you can use the 
demonstration's Pop-Up calculator in 
your own programs by including lines 
20-60 and 1000-1390. 



POP-UP 



C00I9 


A2 


02 


B5 


00 


9D 


FD 


C0I98 


E0 


FB 


D0 


F6 


A9 


FF 


caiB 


a9 


00 


85 


FC 


A9 


F6 


CUIB 


ft9 


A3 


85 


FE 


A0 


00 


C020 


91 


FD 


E6 


FD 


D0 


02 


C028 


E6 


FB 


D0 


02 


E6 


FC 


C030 


C9 


10 


D0 


EA 


A5 


FC 


C038 


D0 


G4 


A9 


00 


85 


FB 


C04a 


85 


FC 


A9 


07 


85 


FD 


C048 


85 


FE 


Bl 


FB 


91 


FD 


C050 


D0 


02 


E6 


FE 


E6 


FB 


C058 


E6 


FC 


A5 


FB 


C9 


E8 


C060 


R5 


FC 


C9 


07 


D0 


E4 


C068 


85 


FB 


A9 


D8 


85 


FC 


C070 


85 


FD 


A9 


A9 


85 


FE 


C078 


n 


FD 


Ee 


FD 


D0 


02 


C080 


Ee 


FB 


D0 


02 


E6 


FC 


C088 


C9 


E8 


D0 


EA 


A5 


FC 


C090 


D0 


E4 


A2 


00 


BD 


00 


C09a 


D7 


AD 


E8 


E0 


2F 


D0 


C0A0 


8E 


06 


AE 


A9 


36 


85 


C0R8 


02 


BD 


00 


A0 


95 


00 


C0B0 


D9 


D0 


F6 


A2 


F3 


BD 


C0B8 


95 


00 


E8 


E0 


FB 


D0 


C0C0 


SB 


85 


FB 


A9 


A0 


85 


C0C8 


FF 


85 


FD 


A9 


00 


85 


C0D0 


FB 


91 


FD 


E6 


FD 


D0 


C0D8 


?E 


E6 


FB 


00 


02 


Ee 


C0E0 


FB 


C9 


6D 


D0 


EA 


A5 


C0E8 


A2 


D0 


E4 


AE 


FC 


A2 


C0F0 


85 


01 


9A 


A9 


F6 


8D 


C0P8 


A9 


CI 


8D 


25 


03 


A9 


C100 


77 


02 


A9 


0D 


BD 


78 


C108 


02 


85 


C6 


A9 


lA 


8D 


C110 


A9 


C2 


8D 


03 


03 


A2 


C118 


D8 


09 


80 


95 


D8 


CA 


C120 


A2 


08 


BD 


F7 


07 


9D 


C128 


CA 


D0 


F7 


4C 


31 


EA 


C130 


85 


01 


A2 


02 


BD 


FD 


C138 


00 


E8 


E0 


FB 


00 


F6 


C140 


85 


FB 


A9 


00 


85 


FC 



A2 E8 ID 

85 FB D6 
85 FD 19 
Bl FB 5C 
E6 FE 02 
A5 FB C8 
C9 03 IB 
A9 04 04 
A9 A6 87 
E6 FD 92 
D0 02 52 
D0 EA 7F 
A9 00 0B 
A9 EF Dl 
Bl FB BB 
E6 FE 5A 
A5 FB 21 
C9 DB 82 
D0 9D 35 
F5 BA FF 

01 A2 C7 
E8 E0 04 
00 A0 93 
F6 A9 EA 
FC A9 7 2 
FE Bl CB 

02 E6 01 
FC A5 6B 
FC C9 3F 
A9 37 74 
24 03 9G 
13 8D 36 
02 A9 CI 
02 03 6F 
lA BS 87 
D0 F7 3F 
EA C5 78 
A9 36 C7 
A2 95 EB 
A9 FF 87 
A9 F6 25 



ci4a 

C150 
C153 
C160 
C16B 
C170 
C178 
C180 
C188 
C190 
C198 
C1A0 
C1A8 
C1B0 
C1B8 
C1C0 
C1C8 
C1D0 
C1D8 
C1E0 
C1E8 
C1F0 
ClFB 
C200 
C208 
C210 
C213 
C220 
C228 
C230 
C238 
C240 
C248 
C2S0 
C258 
C260 
C268 
C270 
C278 
C2a0 
C288 
C290 
C298 
C2A0 
C2AB 
C2B0 
C2B8 
C2C0 
C2C8 
C2D0 
C2DB 
C2E0 
C2E8 
C2F0 
C2F8 
C300 
C308 
C310 
C318 
C320 
C328 
C330 
C338 
C340 
C348 
C350 
C358 
C360 
C368 
C370 



85 


FD 


A9 


A3 


85 


FE 


A0 


00 


E6 


C378 


:e0 


80 


4F 


C7 


52 


58 


40 


FP 


2B 


Bl 


FD 


91 


FB 


E6 


FD 


00 


02 


F0 


C380 


:00 


00 


55 


FF 


00 


00 


00 


00 


B2 


E6 


FE 


E6 


FB 


00 


02 


E6 


FC 


05 


C3B8 


:03 


00 


00 


80 


00 


00 


00 


24 


BD 


A5 


FB 


C9 


10 


D0 


EA 


AS 


FC 


6A 


C390 


:ec 


55 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


A3 


C9 


03 


00 


E4 


A9 


00 


85 


FB 


4E 


0398 


:00 


00 


00 


00 


06 


17 


00 


00 


33 


A9 


04 


85 


FC 


A9 


07 


85 


FD 


BC 


O3A0 


:3C 


03 


00 


00 


00 


06 


00 


60 


7F 


A9 


A6 


85 


FE 


Bl 


FD 


91 


FB 


BF 


c3Aa 


:0a 


FA 


9F 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


Ee 


Ee 


FD 


D0 


02 


E6 


FE 


E6 


FB 


2E 


C3B0 


:A0 


01 


08 


04 


00 


00 


08 


0C 


26 


D0 


02 


E6 


FC 


A5 


FB 


C9 


E8 


3B 


C3BS 


00 


04 


00 


02 


20 


00 


00 


00 


62 


D0 


EA 


A5 


FC 


C9 


07 


00 


E4 


AC 


C3C0 


:04 


00 


00 


27 


00 


85 


00 


FF 


02 


A9 


00 


85 


FB 


A9 


D8 


85 


FC 


lA 


C3C8 


00 


00 


FF 


FF 


00 


00 


FF 


FF 


50 


A9 


EF 


85 


FD 


A9 


A9 


85 


FE 


83 


C3D0 


:00 


00 


FF 


FF 


00 


00 


FF 


FF 


58 


Bl 


FD 


91 


FB 


E6 


FD 


D0 


02 


49 


C3D8 


:00 


20 


20 


34 


39 


37 


35 


35 


F5 


E6 


FE 


E6 


FB 


D0 


02 


E6 


FC 


5D 


C3E0 


00 


30 


30 


30 


30 


FF 


00 


00 


FE 


A5 


FB 


C9 


E8 


D0 


EA 


A5 


FC 


50 


C3E8 


FF 


FF 


00 


00 


FF 


FF 


00 


0.0 


70 


C9 


DB 


D0 


E4 


A2 


00 


BD 


07 


F0 


C3F0 


FF 


FF 


00 


00 


FF 


FF 


00 


00 


78 


AD 


9D 


00 


D0 


E8 


E0 


2F 


D0 


91 


C3F8 


FF 


FF 


00 


00 


FF 


FF 


00 


00 


80 


F5 


AE 


06 


AE 


A9 


37 


85 


01 


DC 


C400 


FF 


FF 


00 


00 


FF 


FF 


00 


00 


89 


9A 


4C 


F3 


C5 


EA 


EA 


EA 


A9 


lA 


C408 


FF 


FF 


00 


00 


FF 


FF 


00 


00 


91 


83 


8D 


02 


03 


A9 


A4 


8D 


03 


F7 


C410 


FF 


FF 


00 


00 


FF 


FF 


00 


00 


99 


03 


A9 


57 


80 


24 


03 


A9 


Fl 


8E 


C418 


FF 


FF 


00 


00 


FF 


FF 


00 


00 


Al 


8D 


25 


03 


4C 


31 


EA 


A9 


57 


89 


C420 


FF 


FF 


00 


00 


FF 


FF 


00 


00 


A9 


8D 


24 


03 


A9 


Fl 


80 


25 


03 


5A 


C428 


FF 


FF 


00 


00 


FF 


FF 


00 


00 


Bl 


08 


A9 


00 


20 


90 


FF 


28 


20 


EA 


C430 


FF 


FF 


00 


00 


FF 


FF 


00 


00 


B9 


60 


A6 


AD 


EB 


C2 


85 


15 


AD 


OF 


C438 


FF 


FF 


00 


00 


FF 


FF 


00 


00 


01 


EC 


02 


85 


14 


20 


A6 


A8 


40 


E7 


0440 


FF 


FF 


00 


00 


FF 


FF 


00 


00 


C9 


AE 


A7 


78 


80 


E9 


C2 


8E 


EA 


29 


C448 


FF 


FF 


00 


00 


FF 


FF 


00 


00 


01 


C2 


A9 


83 


80 


02 


03 


A9 


A4 


CE 


C450 


FF 


FF 


00 


00 


FF 


FF 


00 


00 


09 


8D 


03 


03 


A9 


57 


80 


24 


03 


6C 


C458 


FF 


FF 


00 


00 


FF 


FF 


00 


00 


El 


A9 


Fl 


8D 


25 


03 


A9 


00 


80 


57 


0460 


FF 


FF 


00 


00 


FF 


FF 


00 


00 


E9 


E7 


C2 


A9 


36 


85 


01 


A2 


2D 


9D 


C468 


FF 


FF 


00 


00 


FF 


FF 


00 


00 


Fl 


BD 


FD 


A2 


95 


00 


E8 


E0 


39 


70 


0470 


FF 


FF 


00 


00 


FF 


FF 


00 


00 


F9 


D0 


F6 


A9 


37 


85 


01 


AD 


E9 


12 


0478 


FF 


FF 


00 


00 


FF 


FF 


00 


00 


02 


C2 


AE 


EA 


C2 


58 


4C 


83 


A4 


0C 


0480 


FF 


FF 


00 


00 


FF 


FF 


00 


00 


0A 


A9 


EE 


85 


FB 


A9 


02 


85 


FC 


3F 


C4a8 


FF 


FF 


00 


00 


FF 


7D 


EA 


00 


DD 


A9 


00 


85 


FD 


A9 


A0 


85 


FE 


25 


0490 


FF 


00 


22 


0E 


BC 


81 


70 


EA 


11 


A0 


00 


Bl 


FB 


91 


FD 


E6 


FD 


84 


0498 


7D 


EA 


00 


17 


08 


0E 


BC 


81 


36 


D0 


02 


E6 


FE 


Ee 


FB 


00 


02 


76 


C4A0 


85 


BD 


0C 


BD 


BA 


0E 


0F 


FF 


E5 


se 


FC 


A5 


FD 


C9 


FD 


D0 


EA 


18 


C4A8 


7D 


EA 


02 


07 


20 


21 


DA 


E4 


7C 


A5 


FE 


C9 


A2 


00 


E4 


20 


FD 


54 


O4B0 


00 


07 


FF 


70 


78 


85 


01 


00 


36 


AE 


20 


8A 


AD 


20 


F7 


B7 


A5 


8F 


C4B8 


22 


CF 


E5 


00 


0A 


14 


El 


64 


CC 


14 


8D 


EC 


C2 


A5 


15 


SD 


EB 


05 


C4C0 


A5 


85 


A4 


81 


F4 


17 


81 


80 


B2 


C2 


A9 


00 


8D 


E7 


C2 


78 


A9 


A7 


C4Ca 


00 


00 


00 


01 


86 


60 


00 


00 


18 


AB 


BD 


14 


03 


A9 


C2 


80 


15 


9A 


C4D0 


00 


0E 


01 


00 


74 


A7 


79 


A6 


9A 


03 


58 


60 


A5 


C5 


CD 


E8 


C2 


26 


C4D8 


9C 


2C 


9E 


35 


32 


30 


39 


35 


DC 


F0 


20 


8D 


E8 


C2 


C9 


40 


F0 


A5 


C4E0 


00 


35 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


B7 


19 


C9 


04 


D0 


15 


AD 


80 


02 


47 


C4E8 


2E 


4F 


42 


4A 


22 


20 


38 


20 


A8 


D0 


10 


AD 


E7 


C2 


49 


02 


80 


B3 


C4F0 


31 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


i3 


E7 


C2 


F0 


03 


4C 


0fi( 


C0 


40 


71 


C4F8 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


82 


2E 


CI 


4C 


31 


EA 


78 


A9 


31 


38 


0500- 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


8B 


BD 


14 


03 


A9 


EA 


8D 


15 


03 


DF 


C508 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


93 


A9 


00 


80 


E7 


C2 


58 


60 


00 


A3 


C510 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


9B 


04 


40 


00 


03 


EA 


FF 


94 


FF 


31 


0518- 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


A3 


00 


AA 


Bl 


91 


B3 


22 


22 


00 


DA 


C520- 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


AB 


00 


4C 


00 


FF 


00 


04 


00 


00 


Al 


C528' 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


B3 


02 


00 


7F 


CB 


19 


16 


00 


0A 


60 


C530 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


BB 


76 


A3 


04 


EA 


03 


00 


00 


00 


3B 


C538 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


C3 


76 


A3 


B3 


BD 


51 


00 


00 


00 


98 


C540 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


CB 


00 


01 


08 


01 


C6 


01 


C6 


01 


B9 


C548- 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


03 


C6 


FF 


CF 


00 


00 


FF 


CF 


FA 


9F 


0550 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


DB 


FF 


FA 


00 


4F 


0C 


5C 


4E 


03 


A5 


C558- 


00 


00 


00 


00 


08 


00 


A0 


00 


65 


17 


03 


02 


53 


41 


24 


18 


IE 


62 


C560 


0E 


F6 


04 


0A 


00 


02 


10 


00 


F9 


18 


FF 


0B 


00 


00 


00 


IE 


18 


81 


0568 


00 


48 


EB 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


83 


00 


03 


4C 


B7 


00 


00 


69 


17 


77 


C570 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


FB 


62 


17 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


0A 


00 


C578- 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


04 


76 


A3 


19 


00 


00 


00 


00 


90 


AF 


C580 


00 


A9 


57 


80 


24 


03 


A9 


Fl 


AC 


CB 


7A 


00 


00 


00 


76 


00 


80 


BE 


0588- 


8D 


25 


03 


A9 


00 


85 


15 


A9 


9 


A3 


E6 


7A 


00 


02 


E6 


7B 


AD 


20 


C590 


64 


85 


14 


20 


A6 


A8 


4C 


AE 


53 


06 


02 


C9 


3A 


B0 


0A 


C9 


20 


Bl 


0598 


A7 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


F7 


F0 


EF 


38 


E9 


30 


38 


E9 


00 


19 


O5A0- 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


2C 



G-26 COMPUTE JULY 1992 



C5AS:00 
C5B0:0B 
C5B8:00 
C5C0:00 
C5C8:00 
CSD0:00 
C5D8:00 
C5E0:1A 
C5E8:00 
C5F0:6B 
C5F8:9D 
C600:C1 



00 00 00 
00 00 00 
00 00 00 
00 00 00 
00 00 00 
00 00 00 
00 SB G3 
R7 E4 hi 
B0 DA 56 
8E 53 A2 
F7 07 CA 
00 00 00 



00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
83 A4 
8 6 AE CB 
00 9F 04 
08 BD EA 
D0 F7 4C 
00 00 00 



00 34 
00 3C 
00 44 
00 4C 
00 54 
00 5C 
A5 61 
00 01 
74 5C 
C5 3D 
DF BD 
00 eE 



5A 5A C0 E8 
RA 6A AA 10 
55 55 65 C7 



CALCULATOR.SPR 



3E00 
3E08 
3E10 
3Eia 
3E20 
3E28 
3E30 
3E38 
3E40 
3E48 
3E50 
3E58 
3E60 
3E68 
3E70 
3E78 
3E80 
3E8 8 
3E90 
3E98 
3EA0 
3EA8 
3EB0 
3EB8 
3EC0 
3ECa 
3ED0 
3ED8 
3EE0 
3EE3 
3EF0 
3EF8 
3F00 
3F08 
3F10 
3F18 
3F20 
3F28 
3P30 
3F38 
3F40 
3F48 
3FS0 
3F58 
3F60 
3F68 
3F70 
3F78 
3F80 
3F88 
3F90 
3F98 
3FA0 
3FA8 
3FB0 



;SE 5E 

:B0 BE 

:AA B0 

:00 00 

:00 00 

: 00 00 

:00 00 

: 00 00 

;AA 5E 

;5E AA 

;AA AA 

:00 00 

; 00 00 

:00 00 

:00 00 

100 00 

;5E 5E 

;5E BE 

;RA AA 

100 00 

; 00 00 

: 00 00 

:00 00 

:00 00 

;6A A5 

;5E 6A 

;AA AA 

: 00 00 

: 00 00 

;00 00 

;00 00 

: 00 00 

:55 55 

;B0 AA 

;5E B0 

;BE BE 

;B0 AA 

:5E 80 

;BE BE 

;B0 AA 

:55 55 

;AA AA 

;5E 5E 

;EA BE 

:AA AA 

; 5E 5E 

;AA BE 

;AA AA 

!55 55 

;AA AA 

;55 55 

;FF FF 

:AA hPi 

;5E 5E 

;BE BE 



B0 5E 
BE 80 
FF FF 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
5E AA 
BE BE 
FF FF 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
5E 5E 
BE BE 
FF FF 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
5E 6A 
AB FE 
7F FF 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
00 00 
50 AA 
AA B0 
5E 5E 
B0 AA 
AA B0 
5E 5E 
B0 AA 
AA B0 
55 AA 
AA AA 
EA 5E 
BE AA 
AA AA 
AA 5E 
BE AA 
AA AA 
55 AA 
AA AA 
55 55 
FF AA 
AA AA 
5E 5E 
BE AA 



5E 10 

AA 7B 

00 95 

00 94 

00 9C 

00 A4 

00 AC 

3F F3 

5E 40 

AA 62 

00 CC 

00 D4 

00 DC 

00 E4 

00 EC 

5A 4F 

5E FC 

AA A7 

00 0D 

00 15 

00 ID 

00 25 

00 2D 

5A 8F 

A5 6F 

6A AA AA 6A 32 

FF 00 00 00 3D 



5E B0 5E 

AA AA B0 

F0 00 00 

00 00 00 

00 00 00 

00 00 00 

00 00 00 

00 00 00 

5E 5E AA 

AA AA AA 

FF 00 00 

00 00 00 

00 00 00 

00 00 00 

00 00 00 

00 00 00 

5E 5E 5E 

AA AA AA 

FF 00 00 

80 00 00 

00 00 00 

00 00 00 

00 00 00 

00 00 00 

AS 5E 6A 



00 00 00 

00 00 00 

00 00 00 

00 00 00 

00 00 00 

AA B0 AA 

5A 5A B0 

B0 5E 5E 

AA B0 AA 

5A 5A B0 

B0 5E 5E 

AA B0 AA 

5A 5A B0 

AA AA AA 

AA 5A 5A 

5E EA 5E 

AA AA AA 

AA 5A 5A 

5E AA 5E 

AA AA AA 

AA 5A 5A 

AA AA AA 

55 55 55 

55 55 55 

AA AA AA 

5A 5A 5A 

5E 5E 5E 

AA AA AA 



00 55 
00 5D 
00 65 

00 eD 
00 75 
AA 4B 
5E E5 
B0 08 
AA 7E 
5E FD 
B0 20 
AA 96 
A5 5D 
AA 14 
EA 25 
5E 9 2 
AA 7E 
AA FC 
5E Al 
AA 76 
C0 2B 
AA 54 
55 07 
55 0F 
AA CI 
5E 6E 
5E 27 
AA C0 



65 55 55 

AA eA AA 

A5 5A 6A 

6A A5 5E 8F 

AA 6 A AA 95 

A5 5A A5 AB 



91 
33 
58 



3FB8:AA AA AA AA 5A 

3FC0: 55 55 55 6A AA 

3FC8:AA 6A AA AA 65 

3FD0:55 55 65 55 55 

3FDa:6B FF FF 6A AA 

3FE0:AA 6A AA AA 6A 

3FE8:A5 5E 6A A5 5E 

3FF0:6A AB FE 6A AA 

3FF8:AA 6A AA AA 6A 

DEMO 

FF 20 POKE532B0,0:POKE53265,11 

;POKE53281,0: PRINT" {CLE} 
":POKE53265,27 
BA 30 POKE147,0:SYS57812"POP-O 

P",8,l:SyS62631 
FX 40 POKE147,0:SYS57812"CALCU 

LATOR.SPR", 8,1: SYS 62631 
EH 50 : 

EB 60 SYS49752,1020:REM ENABLE 
POP-OP AND SET LINE TO 
{ SPACE j BRANCH TO 
MJ 70 : 
KG 80 AS«"{RED}{13 SPACES}COPY 

RIGHT 1992"+CHRS(13) 
GE 90 A5=A$+"{4 SPACES }COMPUTE 
PUBLICATIONS, INTL, LTD 
"+CHR9(13) 
EC 100 AS=A5+"{10 SPACESlALL R 
IGHTS RESERVED" :F0RT=1T 
06:AS=A$+CHR$(13) :NEXT 
BJ 110 B$="{YEL){9 SPACESlPOP- 
UP DEMO PRESS <Fl>":POR 
T=1T06:B5=BS+CHR$(13) :N 
EXT 
AX 120 F0RT=1T0LEN(AS) :PRINTMI 
D9(AS,T,1) ;:FORDL=1TO40 
: NEXT: NEXT 
GP 130 F0RT=1T0LEN{B$) :PRINTHI 
D${BS,T,1) ; :FQRDL=lT0 4a 
: NEXT: NEXT 
MM 140 GOTO120 
PM 150 : 

PP 1000 REM POP-UP CALCULATOR 
SX 1010 : 

DQ 1020 V=53248:POKEV+21,0:S=2 
55:FORT=2040TO204 7:POK 
ET,S:S=S-1:NEXT , 
AX 1030 F0RT=39T046:P0KEV+T,12 
: NEXT :POKEV+37, 15: POKE 
V+3 8,ll:POKEV+2 8,255 
DQ 1040 S=0:FORT=0TO6STEP2:POK 

EV+T,32+S:S=S+48:NEXT 

HK 1050 S=0:FORT=8TO14STEP2;PO 

KEV+T,32+S:S=S+4 8:NEXT 

RM 1060 F0RT=1T07STEP2:P0KEV+T 

,98: NEXT: FORT =9T01SSTE 

P2:POKEV+T,140:NEXT 

ES 1070 POKEV+29,255:POKEV+23, 

255:P0KEV+21,255 
GJ 1080 PRINT" {HOME] {5 DOWN)": 
F0RT=1T07: PRINT" 
{RIGHT}{23 SPACES}":NE 
XT 
QA 1090 POKEV+27, 255; PRINT" 

{HOME} (7 DOWN} "TAB (15) 
"<2>C 7 8 9":PRINT 
KK 1100 PRINTTAB(4) "{RED}M+ * 
{SPACE}+ %{3 SPACES] 



t2}. 4 5 6";PR1NT 
DH 1110 PRINTTAB(4)"(RED)HR / 

{SPACE}- ={3 SPACES) 

{2}0 1 2 3" 
QX 1120 GOSUB1280 
QM 1130 RT=V:01$=0P$ 
JC 1140 GOSUB1290:Vl=V:O2S=OPS 
BK 1150 IF01S="+"THENRT=RT+V1 
BE 1160 IF01S="-"TKENRT=RT-V1 
MS 1170 IF01S="*"THENRT=ET*V1 
CH 1180 IFO1S="/"ANDV1=0THEN12 

10 
SR 1190 IP01S="/"THENRT=RT/V1 
SP 1200 IFLEN{STR$ (RT)) <12THEN 

1230 
KG 1210 PRINT"{HOHE} (7 DOWN} 

{2 RIGHT) (6 SPACES}ERR 

OR":GETAS:IFA$<>" 

{H0HE}"ANDA5<>"{CLR}"T 

HEN1210 
XM 1220 GOTO1120 
GA 1230 PRINT"{H0ME}{7 DOWN} 

(2 RIGHT}{11 SPACES}": 

PRINT" {HOME} {7 DOWN } "T 

AB(13-LEN(STRS (RT) ) ) RT 
AK 1240 IFO2$<>"="THEN01S=O2$; 

GOTO1140 
RB 1250 POKE198,0:WAIT198,1:GE 

TA$:IFA$="="THEN12 50 
GP 1260 IFAS="+"ORA$="-"ORAS=" 

*"ORA$="/"THEN01S=AS:G 

OTO1140 
HF 1270 D$="":C=0:DP=0:Z=0:GOS 

UB1310:GOTO1130 
XD 1280 PRINT"{H0ME}{7 DOWN] 

{2 RIGHT}{BLU3 

{10 SPACESla" 
GE 1290 D$="":BS="{11 SPACES)" 

;C=3:DP=0:Z=0 
HP 1300 POKE198,0:WAIT198,1;GE 

TA5 
BM 1310 IFA$="{HOHE}"ORAS=" 

{CLR}"THENCLR:GOTO1120 
QC 1320 IFZAND(AS="+"ORA$="-"0 

RA$="*"ORA$="/"ORA$="= 

")THEN0PS=AS:V=VAL(D5) 

:RETURN 
ME 1330 IFA$="."ANDDP=0THENDP= 

1:GOSUB1370:GOTO1360 
PK 1340 IFASC(AS)<480RASC(A$)> 

57ORO9THEN1300 
DG 1350 IFAS="0"ANDDP=0ANDVAL{ 

DS}=0THENGOSUB1390:GOT 

01300 
DE 1360 DS=D$+A$; PRINT" {HOME} 

{7 D0WN}"TAB(2)LEFT$(B 

$,11-LEN(DS))D$:C=C+1: 

Z=1:GOTO1300 
SD 1370 IFVAL(DS) =0THEND$="0": 

C=1:Z=1 
JG 1380 RETURN 
RA 1390 PRINT" {HOME) {7 DOWN} 

{2 RIGHT} (10 SPACES)0" 

:Z=1:RETURN 



Richard Penn is a proiifjc Commodore 
programmer who lives in Montreal, Que- 
bec, Canada. 

JULY 1992 COMPUTE G-2? 



PROGRAMS 



MIMICI28 



By Joseph Sheppard 
I set out to design this diversion just to 
show my parents that all my hours in 
front a computer weren't a waste of time. 
Mimic 128 does a good job of showing 
off how easy it is to use the 128's sound 
and graphic commands in BASIC. 

Mimic 128 is a simple but entertaining 
game that's similar to the hand-held elec- 
tronic game Simon Says. The computer 
lights one of four colored panels at ran- 
dom and plays a corresponding musical 
tone. You're to press the joystick up, 
down, left, or right to light the same pan- 
el in response. If you're successful, the 
computer will repeat the sequence, add- 
ing an additional panel each time to the 
series. The object is to mimic the comput- 
er, lighting the same sequence of panels. 

Entenng the Program 

fylimic 128 is written entirely in BASIC 
7. To help avoid typing errors, enter 
the program with The Automatic Proof- 
reader; see "Typing Aids" elsewhere in 
this section. Be sure to save a copy of 
the program to tape or disk before you 
exit Proofreader. 

High Scores 

For those with a competitive nature, 
Mimic 128 has a high-score sequential 
file named MM.HS that keeps track of 
the best player's name, date, and the 
number of panels he or she has prop- 
erly responded to. The first lime the pro- 
gram is run, MIMIC searches for this 
file. Since no such file exists, the first 
player will beat a high score of 0. The 
first player is guaranteed a spot on the 
disk for at least one session, no matter 
how badly he or she plays. 

Tape Support 

Players using tape drives should mod- 
ify the OPEN statements in lines 35 
and 30120 to ,1 instead of ,8, Also, 
tape users should immediately play a 
game to establish the high-score file di- 
rectly behind the section of tape 
where the game file has been saved. 
After you finish a game, the comput- 
er will check to see if you made the 
high score. If so, you'll be asked for the 
appropriate information. After a game, 
you'll be presented with a menu 
whose choices consist of Try again, 

G-28 COMPUTE JULY 1992 



Continue, and End. Select Continue if 
you wish to continue with the current 
game. The computer won't accept a 
high score based on the continuation 
of an old game, however. Try again 
starts a new game, and End returns 
you to BASIC. 

One last note: Be sure to explore the 
sound capabilities of your machine. 
Feel free to alter the sound envelopes, 
producing different tones and sounds 
for each panel. You can also make the 
final sound of the game (the one gen- 
erated when you mess up) a little less 
dramatic and frightening. 

MIMIC 128 

MM 5 REM COPYRIGHT 1992 - COHP 
UTE PUBLICATIONS INTL LTD 
- ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 
CG 10 DIM MDS(60) ,MC(60) ,MCS(6 

0) 
QR 20 COLOR0,1:COLOR4,1 
EE 30 PRINT" {CLR}'':PRIST"DIFFI 
CULTY LEVEL (1-EASIER TO 
5-BORING) ":GETKEYDL 
RE 32 IFDL<10RDL>5 THEN3a 
EG 35 0PEN2,8,2,"HM.HS,S,R" 
RB 36 INPUT#2, ZN$(1) ,ZZS(1) ,2 

D$(l) 
PG 37 DCLOSE 
MB 38 ZZ (1)=VAL(ZZ$(1)) 
SJ 60 PRINT"{CLR}":F0RZ=1T012: 
PRINT;NEXTZ:PRINT" 
{12 SPACES}SETTING UP BO 
ARD":PRINT"(10 SPACESJTE 
N SECONDS, PLEASE. ":SLEE 
P2 
QE 70 FAST 
RR 80 GOSUB10000 
HP 90 SLOW 
QS 100 NT=RND(TI) :NT=INT(RND(1 

) *4+l) 
XA 110 NTS=STR$(NT) 
RQ 120 IF«T = 1THENNN5 = ",C":X = 17: 

Y=9:C=6 
QX 130 IFNT=2THENNNS="D":X=26: 

Y = 12:C='7 
JK 140 IFNT»3THENNN$="E":X=17: 

Y-15:C=8 
PX 150 IFNT=4THENNNS="F":X=9:Y 

=12:C=3 
EF 160 MS$-MSS+NNS 
FK 170 COLOR2,2;FORZ=1TO600:NE 

XTZ:GOStJB20000 
SA 180 A$="" 

KS 190 F0RT=1T0(LEN(MS$) ) 
MM 200 MC(T)=J0Y(2) 
MX 202 IFHC(T)=1THENMC$(T)="C" 

:X=17: Y=9:C=6:G0TO2ia 
GD 203 IFMC(T)=3THENMCS (T)="D" 

:X=26: Y=12:C-7:GOTO210 
QS 204 IFHC(T)=5THENHC$(T)="E" 

:X=17:Y=15:C=8:GOTO210 
JA 205 IFMC(T)=7THENMC$(T)="F" 
:X=9:Y=12:C=3:GOTO210 



HS 


206 


SS 


210 


SD 


220 


KJ 


221 


GA 


222 


XK 


224 


KR 


226 


CF 


234 


JP 


236 


DA 


238 


XQ 


240 


SH 


243 


QF 


990 


XK 


994 


GK 


995 



KJ 996 



SQ 997 

GG 998 
QJ 1000 



GOTO200 

IFMC$(T)<>MDS (T)THEN240 
CH AR2 , X-1 , Y , "CORRECT " 
PLAYMCS (T) 
F0RZ=1T0DL+75:NEXTZ 
C0L0R3,C 

CHAR3,X-1,Y,"{7 SPACES} 
" 1 

AS=AS+HCS(T) 
NEXTT 

IFA$=MSSTHEN100 
SOaND2,2 50 0,60,2,24 7 0,2 
,1,3048 

SOUNDS, 2000, 50, 2, ,3,3 
PRINT"Y0U G0T";LEN(HS$) 
-1; "CORRECT !":SLEEP3 
IFQQ=0THENGOSUB30000 
FORZ=lT024: PRINT: HE XTZ: 
INPtJT"{BLU}DO YOU WISH 
{SPACE}T0 (T)RY AGAIN, { 
C)0NTINCJE{3 SPACES}0R ( 
E)ND";M$ 

IFM$="T"THENQQ=0: PRINT: 
PRINT:PRINT:A$="":MSS=" 
": PRINT: PRINT :PRINT;GOT 
0100 

IFM$= "C"THEN0Q=1 : PRINT ; 
PRINT: PRINT :GOTO17 
GRAPHIC0,1:END 
REM ***{2 SPACES]GRAP 
HIC SETUP(2 SPACES}** 



MH 10001 REM ***{2 SPACESlPLAY 

ING B0ARD{2 SPACES}** 

* 

HQ 10005 GFAPHIC4,l,23:COLORl, 
2 

SH 10100 WIDTH2:ORAWl,28,46T07 
3,4 6T078,S3T083,46T01 
27,4 6T014 2,75T0142,12 
3T0127,152T083,152T07 
8,14 5T07 3,152T028,152 
T014,125T014,74T028,4 
6:WIDTH1 
FB 10110 DRAWl,51,66TO105,66TO 

85,90TO71,90TO51,66 
RR 10120 DRAWl,72,109TO84,109T 
O104,132TO51,132TO72, 
109 
EH 10130 DRAW1,95,93T0115,75TO 
129,75T0129,123T0115, 
123TO95,105TO95,93 
GC 10140 DRAW1,61,105TO61,93TO 
41,75T029,75T029,123T 
O41,123TO61,105 
AQ 10200 COL0Rl,16:COLOR2,3:CO 

LOR3,7 
GR 10210 PA1NT2, 50, 100,1 
ED 10220 PAINT3, 101, 100,1 
DG 10230 C0L0R2,6:C0L0R3,8 
ES 10240 PAINT2,60,75,1 
SB 10250 PAINT3, 75, 120,1 
GD 10300 CHAR1,17,12,"HIMIC" 
AB 10999 RETURN 
FR 20000 REM{2 'SPACES}*** 

{2 SPACES}LIGHT UP PA 
NEL{2 SPACES}*** 
RB 20100 F0ET=1T0LEN(MS$) 
KK 20110 MDS(T)=MIDS{MS$,T,1) 



GH 20120 NEXTT 

HD 20130 F0RT=1T0LEN(MS$) 

JD 20140 PLAYMD$(T) 

BD 20142 IFHD? (T)="C"THENX=17 

Y=9:C=6 
DD 20144 IFHD$ (T)="D"THENX=25 

Y=12:C=7 
QH 20146 IFHDS(T)="E"THENX=17 

Y=15:C=8 
XC 20148 IFMD$(T)="F"THENX=9:Y 

=12:C=3 
RQ 20150 CHAR2,X,Y, "PRESS" 
KM 20160 FORZ=1TODL*100:NEXTZ 
QB 20170 C0L0R3,C 
AS 20180 CHAR3,X,Y,"(5 SPACES} 

'M 
ER 20190 NEXTT 
FG 20199 RETURN 
JP 30000 MS=LEN(MS$) -1 
EM 30010 IFMS<ZZ(1) THBNRETURN 
QD 30020 GRAPHIC0,1 
DK 30030 PRINT"(BED)CONGRADULA 

TIONS! YOU HAVE JUST 

[SPACE] BEAT THE 

(2 SPACES) PREVIOUS RE 

CORD OF" 
BF 30043 PRINT"fGRN3 ";ZZC1);" 

[RED] SET BY {GRN}";Z 

NS (1) ;" {REDlON {GRNl 

";ZDS(1);"(RED}" 
CX 30050 GETKEYAS 
RA 30060 PRINT :INPUT"WHAT IS Y 

OUR NAKE";ZNS (1) 
ER 30070 INPUT"WHAT IS TODAY'S 

DATE";ZDS (1) 
PA 30080 ZZ (1) =MS:GS = CHRS(13) 
JB 30100 PRINT:PRINT"(BLU}ONE 

[SPACElMOHENT; SAVING 
SCORES. . ." 
RP 30110 SCRATCH"M«.HS" 
RJ 30120 OPEN2,8,2,"MM,HS,S,W" 
EE 30130 PRINT#2, ZNS(l) GS ZZ 

(1) G$ ZDS(l) 
QS 30140 DCLOSE 
HK 30150 GRAPHIC4,0,23 
AD 30160 RETURN 



Joseph Sheppard lives in West Fork, 
Arkansas. 



SPEEDPUR6E 



By Daniel Lightner 

SpeedCheck is a popular utility program 
tiiat checks for misspelled words in any 
SpeedScript word processing document. 
It examines text word by word, compar- 
ing words in the document with entries in 
its dictionary. If the program comes 
across a word it doesn't recognize, it high- 
lights the word on your screen so that 
you can correct any misspellings imme- 
diately. If SpeedCheck comes across a 
correctly spelled word that isn't in its dic- 
tionary, it will also highlight that word. 
These new words can then be added to 



SpeedCheck's dictionary As you work 
with SpeedCheck, you can create your 
own personalized dictionary disks, 
which may contain thousands of words. 

Words on the SpeedCheck dictionary 
disk are kept in sequential files, with one 
file for each of the 26 letters of the alpha- 
bet. As new words are added, they are 
tacked onto the end of the appropriate 
file, This makes adding words to the dic- 
tionary fast and simple, but it makes look- 
ing up words slower because words are 
added in random — rather than alphabet- 
ical — order. Within the file for Z, for exam- 
ple, zebra might be found between zymur- 
gyand zipper. 

The only way to find a particular item 
in randomly ordered data is to search se- 
quentially from the first item until the de- 
sired item is found. Thus, when Speed- 
Check looks up a word, it must hunt 
through all the words with the same initial 
letter before it can determine whether or 
not that word is present. 

People who use SpeedCheck know 
how easy it is to have dictionary files con- 
taining duplicate words. SpeedCheck's 
Disk Manager program can help, but it's 
difficult to find duplicates if there are 
many words between them. Sometimes 
there may be three or four duplicate 
words hogging space on the disk, stow- 
ing down SpeedCheck. 

Purging files manually for duplicate 
words can be a tedious task for a human, 
but it's an ideal chore for a computer. 
SpeedPurge is just such a utility. It search- 
es SpeedCheck dictionary files for dupli- 
cate words and deletes them. 

Entering the Program 

SpeedPurge is a fairly short BASIC pro- 
gram. To help avoid typing errors, how- 
ever, enter the program with The Auto- 
matic Proofreader. See "Typing Aids" 
elsewhere in this section. When you've 
finished typing, be sure to save the pro- 
gram to disk. 

Purge Your Files 

SpeedPurge is easy to use; just load 
and run it. When you're ready to start, 
place the disk containing the Speed- 
Check dictionary files in drive 8. 
SpeedPurge prompts for a filename, 
and you enter the letter of the alphabet 
that represents the file that you wish to 
check. For example, press A to check 
the A file and B to check the B file. 



SpeedPurge reads the file into an ar- 
ray and converts it to ASCII format. 
Then it checks the entire file for dupli- 
cate words. When SpeedPurge finds a 
match, it displays the word and the lo- 
cations in the file where the match was 
found. Then it deletes one of the pair. 
It then continues searching until anoth- 
er match is found or until the entire file 
has been checked. When it has fin- 
ished checking the file, SpeedPurge 
asks whether or not you wish to save 
the corrected file. Obviously, if no 
matches were found, there would be 
no need to save the file. Press N if you 
don't want to save it; press Y if you do. 

After it has finished saving the file, 
SpeedPurge asks if you wish to check 
another file. Type Y to continue check- 
ing files or N to exit SpeedPurge. 

SPEEDPURGE 

SH 5 REM COPYRIGHT 1992 

HK 10 REM COMPUTE PUBLICATIONS 

INTL LTD 
MP IS REM ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 
RG 20 CLR:DIMAS(5fl0) :0PEN15,8, 

15 
PK 25 PRINT"{CLR}{DOWN} 

{12 RIGHT}<7>SPEEDPURGE 

{2 DOWN}" 
EG 30 POKE53280,0:POKE53281,0 
EC 35 INPUT" {BLU}FILE {RED}(A- 

Z) tBLU}";F$ 
XR 40 1FLEN(F$)>1THEN25 
PD 45 IFASC(F$)<65ORASC(FS)>90 

THEN25 
PS 50 OPEN2,8,2,"0:"+F$+",S,R" 

:GOSUB2 25:B$=F$:X=l:POKE 

781,2:SYS65478:SYS654e7 
BG 55 SYS65487:A=PEEK(7aa) 
KA 60 IFA>127THENA=A-64:B$=B$+ 

CHRS(A) :A5(X)=B$:B$=FS:X 

=X+1:GOTO80 
CR 65 IFA=39THEN75 
DH 70 IFA<64THENA=A+64 
JM 75 B5=B$+CHRS{A) 
QJ 80 IFST=0THEN55 
QE 85 CLOSE2;POKE781,0:SYS6547 

8:X=X-1 
KS 90 Z=l 
PO 95 IT=0:PRINT"{DOWN}{7}":FO 

RT=ZT0X:A$=A$ (T) tPRINT" 

(UP) (8 SPACES) {8 LEFT}"; 

T;"-";X:P0RR=1T0X 
EQ 100 IFAS=AS(R)THENIFR<>TTHE 

NGOSUB220 
FS 105 NEXTR,T 
KA 110 IFIT-0THEN125 
AG 115 IFIT=XTHENX=X-l;GOT095 
RP 120 F0RT=ITT0X-1:A$(T)=A$(T 

+1) :NEXTT:X=X-l:G0TO95 
FA 125 PRINT"tBLU}":FORT=lTOX; 
PRINTT;AS(T) :A$ (T)=RIGH 
TS (AS(T) ,LEN(A$(T) )-l) 

JULY 1992 COMPUTE G-29 



PROGRAMS 



EP 


130 


MB 


135 


SJ 


140 


SR 


14 5 


RE 


150 


GP 


155 


FG 


160 


AR 


165 



QS 170 



PK 175 



AD 180 
JS 135 

KG 190 

RK 195 

CS 200 
KG 205 
XX 210 
XX 215 
JD 220 



B$="" :F0RR=1T0LEN (R$ (T) 

)-l:A=ASC(MID$ (A$(T) ,R, 

1) ) : IFA>63THENA=A-64 

B$=B$+CHRS (A) :NEXTR:A=A 

SC (RIGHTS (AS (T) ,1)) :A=-A 

+64:BS=B$+CHR$(A) 

A$ (T) =B$:NEXTT 

PRINT" (DOWN} {7>SAVE THI 

S FILE (RED5Y/N" 

GETA$: IFAS = ""THEN15{1 

IFAS="N"THEN190 

IFA$<>"¥"THEN150 

PRINT#15,"S0:"+F$;GOSOB 

230 

OPEN2,8,2,"0:"+FS+",S,W 

":POKE781,2:SYS65481:PO 

KE780,13:SYS65490 

F0RT=1T0X;F0RR=1T0LEN (A 

$(T) ) :AS=MID${A${T) ,R,1 

) :A=ASC (AS) :POKE780,A 

SYS65490 

NEXTR,T:CL0SE2: POKE781 , 

3:SYS65481:GOSUB230 

PRINT" {DOWN} {3}F I m SHED 

1" 

PRINT" {DOWN} {7}D0 ANOTH 

ER FILE {RED}Y/N" 

GETA$: IFAS=""THEN200 

IFA$="Y"THEN20 

IFA$="N"THENCL0SE15:END 

GOTO 200 

PR I NT " ( DOWN } ( BLU } FOUND 

{SPAGE}A MATCHl {RED}"; 

CHR$(34) ;AS(R) ;CHR$(34) 

;" {BLU}";T;"{RED}& 

{BLO}";R 

Z =T : IT =R:T=X:R=X: RETURN 

INPUT#15,EN,EHS,ET,ES 

PRINT" {DOWN} {RED}"EN;EM 

S;ET;ES:IFEN>1THENCL0SE 

15;ST0P 

RETURN 



Daniel Lightner programs and raises 
Himalayan cats in Sidney, Montana. 

ALPHABETIZER 

By Todd Pillingsrud 
As many 64 and 128 programmers 
know from experience, original and pub- 
lic domain programs can quickly fill up 
your disk library. Finding a desired file is 
no problem when ttiere are only a few pro- 
grams on a disk, but wfien file after file 
scrolls by during a directory listing, it can 
be a fiassle. Wouldn't it be easier if all 
files were in alphabetical order? 

Aiphabetizer was written as a solution 
to that problem. It reads a disk directory, 
reorganizes it, and then saves it back to 
disk in alphabetical order. The directory 
stays in alphabetical order until you add 
additional files or programs. 

Alphabetizer consists of two pro- 

G-30 COMPUTE JULY 1992 



GA 


225 


SS 


230 


MF 


235 


HP 


240 



grams. The main program is in BASIC. To 
help avoid typing errors, enter it with The 
Automatic Proofreader. See "Typing 
Aids" elsewhere in this section. Be sure 
to save a copy of the program before you 
exit Proofreader. 

This program loads a short machine 
language program. You'll have to use 
fvlLX, our machine language program, to 
enter it. Save it with the name ALPHA.ML, 
as this is the name used by the BASIC pro- 
gram. When MLX prompts, respond 
with the following values. 

Starting address; COOO 
Ending address: C147 

Putting Disks in Order 

Using Alphabetizer is simple. After run- 
ning it, select a disk you want to alpha- 
betize and place it in the drive. Press 
A to alphabetize it or press D to see its 
directory. When you have finished, 
press Q to quit. 

ALPHABETIZER 

CP 1 REM COPYRIGHT 1992 - COMP 
UTE PUBLICATIONS INTL LTD 
- ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 
CG 5 IFPEEK (49152) O160THENLOA 

D"ALPHA.ML",8,1 
OB 10 PRINT"{CLR}"TAB (11) " 

(DOWN ] /p^\ ************* ** 

isy 

HQ 20 PRINTTAB(ll) "-A - ALPHAS 
ETIZE-":PRINTTAB (11) "-D 
{SPACE}- DIRECTORY 
{2 SPACES}-" 
HS 25 PRINTTAB(ll) "-0 - QUIT 

{7 SPACES}-":PRINTTAB(11 
) "^2}***************{X}" 
RM 27 P0KE56,142:CLR:DIHFPS(14 
4) ,SPS(144) ,SS%^144) 
GETAS: IFA$="A"THEN80 
IFA5="D"THENSYS49411:GOT 
0680 

IFA$<>"Q''THEN30 
PRINT"{CLR}"; :END 
PRINT" {DOWN} READING DIRE 
CT0RY";:0PENl,a,15,"I":G 
OSUB660:CLOSEl 
SYS49152:I1=PEEK(7) :PRIN 
TI1"FILES" 
PRINT" {D0WN}ALPHABETIZI 
NG";F0RT=1T0I1:SPS(T)=S 
PS(T)+FPS(T) :NEXT 
N=I1:LI=1:B (LI)=N+1:M=1 
J=B(LI) :I=M-1;IFJ-M<3TH 

EN360 
MI=INT((I+J)/2) 
I=1+1:1FI=JTHEN320 
IPSP$(I)<=SP$(MI)THEN27 

KX 290 J=J-1:IF1=JTHEN320 



EX 


30 


EA 


40 


QP 


60 


CB 


70 


DK 


80 


PS 


90 


KR 


23 


KP 


24 


DD 


25 


JD 


26 


KM 


27 


MB 


28 



RX 300 IFSP$(J)>'-SP$(MI)THEN29 


PX 310 SPS=SPS(I) :SP$(I)=SP$(J 
) :SPS(J)«SPS:GOTO270 

EH 320 IFI>=MITHENI=I-1 

XS 330 IFJ=MITHEN350 

QC 340 SP$=SP$ (I) :SP$(I)=SP$(M 
I) :SPS(MI)-SPS 

KR 350 LI-L1+1:B(LI)=I:GOTO250 

BC 360 IFJ-M<2THEN390 

EH 370 IFSP$(H)<SP$(M+1)THEN39 



BC 


380 


SP$=SP$(M) :SP$(M)=SP${M 
+1) :SP$CM+1)=SP$ 


GR 


390 


H=B(LI)+1:LI=LI-1:IFLI> 
0THEN250 


QH 


400 


F0RT=1T0I1:FPS{T)=RIGHT 
S(SP5(T) ,5) :SPS(T)=LEPT 
S(SPS(T) ,27) :NEXT 


PS 


410 


OPENl,8,15,"I":GOSUB660 
:OPEN8,a,8,"#":I2=l:PRI 
NT"{D0WN}WR1T1NG DIRECT 
ORY" 


EH 


420 


PRINT#1,"B-P";8;0 


PP 


430 


C=0:READS:IFI1-I2<8THEN 
PRINT#8,CHRS(0)CHRS(255 
) ; :GOTO450 


JB 


440 


PRINT#8,CHRS {18)CHR$ fS) 


DJ 


450 


PRINT#8,RIGHT${FP$(I2) , 
3) ;:GOTO470 


GE 


460 


PRINT#8,FPS(I2) ; 


XD 


470 


PRINT»a,SP5(I2) ; 


SA 


480 


IFI2=I1THEN510 


PX 


490 


I2 = I2+1:C='C+1:IFC<8THEN 
460 


HD 


500 


READS:PRINT#1,"O2";8;0; 
18;S:GOTO420 


CG 


510 


A$ = "":FORT = lT032;AS=A$-f 
CHRS(0) :NEXT 


SG 


520 


C=C+1:IFC=8THEN540 


XA 


530 


PRINT#8,AS; :GOTO520 


MR 


540 


READS:PRINT|1,"U2";8;0; 
18;S:CLOSE8:SYS4 9411:GO 
TO680 


JH 


550 


DATA 4,1,7,4,10,7,13,10 
,16,13,2,16,5,2,8,5,11, 
8,14,11,17,14,3,17,6,3, 
9,6 


HO 


560 


DATA 12,9,15,12,18,15,0 
,18 


RE 


660 


INPUTn,A,B$,C,D;IFA=0T 
KENRETURN 


PP 


670 


PRINTA;B$;C;D 


GQ 


680 


CLOSEl : PRINT" {DOWN} PRES 
S RETURN" 


CO 


690 


GETAS: IFA$<>CHRS (13)THE 
N690 


AH 


700 


RUN 



ALPHA.ML 

ca00:R0 08 20 EC C0 A9 00 85 D8 

0008:02 A9 8E 85 03 A0 02 20 DD 

C010;CF FF C8 D0 FA A9 00 F0 0F 

C018:0E 20 CF FF 91 02 A5 90 13 

C020:D0 0E C8 D0 F4 E6 03 91 8E 

C023:02 C8 91 02 C8 4C 19 C0 99 

C030:20 3B CI 38 A5 03 E9 8D E6 

C038:85 03 A2 04 46 03 66 02 DE 



C040 
C048 
C050 
C058 
C060 
C068 
C070 
C07a 
C080 
C088 
C090 
C098 
C0A0 
C0A8 
C0B0 
C0B8 
C0C0 
C0C8 
C0D0 
C0D8 
C0E0 
C0E8 
C0F0 
C0F8 
C100 
C10B 
C110 
C113 
C120 
C128 
C130 
C138 
C140 



:CA 10 F9 
:A5 2F 85 
:A0 00 Bl 
:15 A0 02 
:48 C8 Bl 
:68 85 03 
:03 DD 98 
;03 69 0R 
:00 95 04 
:00 A9 03 
;A9 00 75 
:D0 53 Da 
;A2 00 86 
;00 85 FB 
;02 Bl FB 
;05 91 03 
:C8 A5 FC 
:A0 00 A9 
:A5 FB 69 
;FC 91 05 
;A2 F8 A9 
;02 D0 C4 
:BA FF A9 
;20 BD FF 
; 4C C6 FF 
;20 D7 AA 
;88 10 FA 
:68 AA 98 
;0fi 84 D3 
:20 A5 FF 
2 D7 A A 
02 D0 D2 
4C CC FF 



4C 9B 
03 A5 
03 DD 
18 Bl 

03 65 
4C 50 
C0 D0 
95 03 
60 A2 
IB 75 

04 95 
A2 02 
07 20 
A9 8E 
P0 2B 
C8 A5 
91 03 
IB 91 

05 91 
20 84 
20 20 
60 A9 
02 A2 
20 C0 
A0 00 
A0 04 
48 20 
A4 93 
20 CD 
20 16 
A5 C6 
A9 08 
00 00 



C0 24 
30 85 
97 C0 

03 65 

04 85 
C0 C8 
E3 18 
AS 04 

02 2C 

03 95 

04 60 
20 48 
43 C0 
85 FC 
A0 00 
FB 91 
20 87 

05 C8 
05 C8 
C0 E6 
8B C0 
08 AA 
46 A0 
FF A2 
20 EC 
20 A5 
A5 FF 
D0 IC 
BD E6 
E7 D0 
D0 04 
20 C3 
00 00 



30 87 
04 46 
F0 48 

03 B5 

04 E8 
Bl 6D 
A5 F5 
69 90 
A2 06 
03 3C 
46 99 
C0 70 
A9 02 
A0 CA 
A9 B3 
03 51 
C0 31 
18 CB 
A5 79 

07 DB 
C6 A0 
20 21 
C0 55 

08 4F 
C0 80 
FF DC 
A8 FP 
A0 78 
D3 4B 
F8 12 
A0 BB 
FF 2E 
00 ID 



Todd Piltingsrud has subscribed to Ga- 
zette for three years and has never 
seen a utility that alphabetizes a direc- 
tory. So he wrote one, He lives in New 
Richland, Minnesota. 

DUPLICATn541 

By Daniel Lightner 

When you w/ant to copy files from one 
disk to another with Commodore BASIC, 
you must first load a file, swap disks, and 
then use the SAVE command. This proc- 
ess can beconne tedious when you copy 
a disk that contains numerous programs 
and files. 

Unlike some computers, the 64/128 
doesn't come with a built-in DISKCOPY 
command. Using a utility program to do 
the job for you is one "way around this 
problem. Duplicate 1541 is just such a util- 
ity. With it and a 1541 disk drive, you can 
make exact copies of any floppy disk 
that isn't copy-protected. 

Typing It In 

Duplicate 1541 is written entirely in ma- 
chine language, but it loads and runs 
like a BASIC program. To enter it, use 
MLX, our machine language entry pro- 



gram; see "Typing Aids" elsewhere in 
this section. When MLX asks for start- 
ing and ending addresses, respond 
with the following values. 

Starting address: 0801 
Ending address: 0DA8 

When you've finished typing in Dupli- 
cate 1541, be sure that you save a 
copy of the program to disk. 

Making Copies 

Before attempting to copy a disk, it's a 
good idea to place a tab over its write- 
protect notch. This is just a precaution 
in case an accident occurs during the 
copy process. 

When you run Duplicate, it'll prompt 
you to place the source disk in drive 8. 
This is the disk that you wish to copy. 
After you press the space bar, Dupli- 
cate 1541 reads the disk name and ID 
and starts reading sectors into memo- 
ry starting at track 1 . When the comput- 
er's memory is filled, the program will 
prompt you to place a target disk in 
the drive. Remove the source disk, 
place a blank disk in the drive, and 
press the space bar. 

Your blank disk doesn't have to be 
formatted; Duplicate 1541 automatical- 
ly formats it for you. To copy an entire 
disk, this process must be repeated 
three more times. You'll be prompted 
when to swap disks. 

Duplicate 1541 isn't exactly a speed- 
ster, but it'll get the job done. To 
boost the copying speed a bit, the pro- 
gram blanks the screen and sets the 
1541 to 1540 mode. If your disk has on- 
ly a few files on it, copying them nr\an- 
ually may be faster . 

Duplicate 1541 will inform you when 
the copying process is complete. You'll 
then be asked if you wish to make 
more copies, if you do, tap the Y key. 
Press the N key, and Duplicate 1541 
will return your computer to BASIC. 
When it has finished all of it's tasks. Du- 
plicate 1541 restores the screen and re- 
turns the drive to 1541 mode. 

DUPLICATE 1541 

0801:0B 08 C8 07 9E 32 30 36 76 

0809:31 00 00 00 A9 00 8D 20 3A 

0811;D0 8D 21 D0 78 A5 01 29 A3 

0319:FE 85 01 58 20 91 0B 20 2D 

0821:CC FF A9 20 80 B2 02 20 2A 



0829 


:EC 


0A 


A9 


08 


20 


Bl 


FF 


A9 


59 


0831 


:6F 


85 


B9 


20 


93 


FF 


A0 


00 


71 


0839 


.B9 


93 


0C 


20 


AS 


FF 


C8 


C0 


26 


0841 


:0B 


D0 


F5 


20 


AE 


FF 


A9 


08 


9C 


0849 


.20 


Bl 


FF 


A9 


6F 


85 


B9 


20 


95 


0851 


.93 


FF 


A0 


00 


B9 


9E 


0C 


20 


BF 


0859 


AS 


FF 


C8 


C0 


09 


00 


F5 


20 


7A 


0861 


:AE 


FF 


A2 


02 


20 


C6 


FF 


A0 


F9 


0869 


00 


A2 


00 


20 


CF 


FF 


C9 


A0 


06 


0871 


.F0 


04 


9D 


38 


03 


E8 


C8 


C0 


40 


0879 


12 


D0 


P0 


A9 


2C 


90 


38 


03 


CA 


0881 


E8 


A0 


00 


20 


CF 


FF 


9D 


38 


22 


0889 


03 


E8 


C8 


C0 


02 


00 


F4 


BE 


46 


0891 


34 


03 


A2 


00 


20 


C6 


FF 


20 


0D 


0899 


E3 


0A 


A2 


00 


20 


EB 


03 


20 


59 


08R1 


43 


09 


20 


06 


0B 


A9 


02 


20 


ID 


08A9 


C3 


FF 


20 


B4 


0B 


20 


9F 


0B 


0E 


0861 


20 


E3 


0A 


A2 


00 


20 


EB 


0B 


99 


08B9 


20 


A2 


09 


20 


EC 


0A 


20 


E3 


59 


08C1 


0A 


A2 


01 


20 


EB 


0B 


20 


43 


B0 


08C9 


09 


20 


06 


0B 


20 


E3 


0A 


A2 


IF 


08D1 


01 


20 


EB 


0B 


20 


A2 


09 


20 


56 


0809 


EC 


0A 


20 


E3 


0A 


A2 


02 


20 


24 


08E1 


EB 


0B 


20 


43 


09 


A2 


03 


20 


DB 


08E9 


EB 


0B 


20 


43 


09 


A2 


04 


20 


E5 


08F1 


EB 


08 


20 


43 


09 


20 


06 


0B 


02 


08F9 


20 


E3 


0A 


A2 


02 


20 


EB 


0B 


Fl 


0901 


20 


A2 


09 


A2 


03 


20 


EB 


0B 


92 


0909 


20 


A2 


09 


A2 


04 


20 


EB 


0B 


A2 


0911 


20 


A2 


09 


20 


EC 


0A 


20 


E3 


B2 


0919 


0A 


A2 


05 


20 


EB 


0B 


20 


43 


8A 


0921 


09 


A2 


06 


20 


EB 


0B 


20 


43 


32 


0929 


09 


20 


06 


0B 


20 


E3 


0A 


A2 


80 


0931 


05 


20 


EB 


0B 


20 


A2 


09 


A2 


3C 


0939 


06 


20 


EB 


0B 


20 


A2 


09 


4C 


6E 


0941 


69 


0B 


A9 


08 


20 


Bl 


FF 


A9 


Fl 


0949 


6F 


85 


B9 


20 


93 


FF 


A0 


00 


8B 


0951 


B9 


A7 


0C 


20 


A8 


FF 


C8 


C0 


45 


0959 


07 


00 


F5 


20 


A3 


0A 


20 


AE 


18 


0961 


FF 


20 


B7 


FF 


C9 


00 


00 


F9 


50 


0969 


A2 


02 


20 


C6 


FF 


A0 


00 


20 


60 


0971 


CF 


FF 


91 


FB 


C8 


C0 


00 


D0 


77 


0979 


F6 


A2 


00 


20 


C6 


FF 


20 


3C 


64 


0981 


0A 


20 


D5 


0A 


AO 


CF 


02 


CO 


7A 


0989 


GB 


02 


D0 


0F 


AO 


CO 


02 


CO 


83 


0991 


C7 


02 


D0 


01 


60 


20 


2C 


0A 


18 


0999 


4C 


43 


09 


20 


22 


0A 


4C 


43 


DA 


09A1 


09 


A2 


02 


20 


C6 


FF 


A9 


08 


B4 


09A9 


20 


Bl 


FF 


A9 


6F 


85 


B9 


20 


F7 


09B1 


93 


FF 


A0 


00 


B.9 


B5 


0C 


20 


7E 


09B9 


A8 


FF 


C8 


C0 


07 


00 


FS 


20 


CC 


09C1 


AE 


FF 


A2 


02 


20 


C9 


FF 


A0 


68 


09C9 


00 


Bl 


FB 


20 


02 


FF 


C8 


C0 


B2 


0901 


00 


D0 


F6 


A2 


03 


20 


C9 


FF 


4D 


09D9: 


20 


3C 


0A 


A9 


08 


20 


Bl 


FF 


0B 


09E1- 


A9 


6F 


85 


B9 


20 


93 


FF 


A0 


E0 


09E9- 


00 


B9 


AE 


0C 


20 


A8 


FF 


C8 


6D 


09F1 


00 


07 


D0 


F5 


20 


A3 


0A 


20 


63 


09F9 


AE 


FF 


20 


B7 


FF 


C9 


00 


00 


DA 


0A01 


F9 


20 


05 


0A 


AO 


CF 


02 


CO 


F3 


0AO9 


CB 


02 


00 


0F 


AD 


CD 


02 


CD 


05 


0A11 


C7 


02 


D0 


01 


60 


20 


2C 


0A 


99 


0A19 


4C 


A2 


09 


20 


22 


0A 


4C 


A2 


93 


aA2i 


09 


18 


AD 


CF 


02 


69 


01 


8D 


B7 


0A29 


CF 


02 


60 


18 


AO 


CD 


02 


69 


45 


0A31- 


01 


80 


CD 


02 


18 


A9 


00 


80 


F7 


0A39: 


CF 


02 


60 


A9 


0B 


20 


B4 


FF 


86 


0A41: 


A9 


6F 


85 


B9 


20 


96 


FF 


20 


CD 


0A49: 


R5 


FF 


80 


E0 


02 


C9 


30 


00 


58 


0A51: 


0D 


20 


A5 


FF 


80 


El 


02 


C9 


6A 



JULY 1992 COMPUTE G-31 



PROGRAMS 



0A59 

0A61 

0R69: 

0A71: 

Bfl79: 

0A81: 

0A89: 

0A91: 

0A991 

0AA1: 

0AA9; 

0AB1: 

0AB9: 

0ACli 

0AC9i 

0AD1; 

0AD9; 

0AE1; 

0AE9; 

0AF1; 

0AF9: 

0B011 

0B09; 

0B11 

0B19i 

0B21 

0B29: 

0B31 

0B39; 

0B41 

0B491 

0B51 

0B59 

0B61 

0B69 

0B71 

0B79 

0B81 

0B89 

0B91 

0B99 

0BA1 

0BA9 

0BB1 

0B39 

0BC1 

0BC9 

0BD1 

0BD9 

0BE1 

0BE9 

0BF1 

0BF9 

0C01 

0C09 

0C11 

0C19 

0C21 

0C29 

0C31 

0C39 

0C41 

0C49 

0C51 

0C59 

0C61 

0C69 

0C71 

0C79 

0C81 



30 D3 
FF 8D 
FF 99 
F5 20 
FF 2B 
0D 20 
FF 20 
03 20 
F5 68 
6E 0B 
0A 0C 
AS FF 
A9 20 
A9 00 
FB 02 
2 D0 
00 85 
FC 60 
8 5 FC 
B9 C2 
2C 00 
D0 F9 
A0 00 
C8 C3 
20 9F 
8D 11 
A9 6F 
00 B9 
C0 03 
02 20 
10 8D 
FF A9 
A0 00 
C8 C0 
20 40 
20 D2 
20 E4 
4E F0 

79 0B 
A0 00 
C3 C0 
A2 92 
02 A2 

:4C C0 
A9 30 
37 03 

80 34 
A0 03 
08 A0 

:FF A9 
:0A 60 
;8D CD 
:02 BD 
;CF 02 
:e0 80 
100 8E 
:02 A0 
!0C AD 
:0F 80 
:56 0C 
:9B CA 
:80 B5 
:AD B2 
r61 0C 
:0A 00 
:ec Bl 
:02 C9 
:02 AC 
:12 19 
:19 IE 



23 
A9 



09 4C AB 
El 02 A0 
E0 02 CB 
AB FF A9 
4 06 
D2 FF 
D2 FF A0 
D2 FF 08 
68 68 68 
AE CD 02 
A0 00 B9 
C8 CC B0 
20 A8 FF 
20 0A 0C 

A8 FF 

60 



20 
23 

00 
20 



18 



0C 
F5 
4C 



20 
0C 20 
F5 4C 



20 

F4 

FB A5 FC 
A9 AS 85 
60 20 40 
20 D2 
20 E4 
19 0B 
B9 ED 0C 
2C D0 F5 
0B AD 11 
00 A9 08 
85 B9 
BC 
D0 

C3 FF AO 
11 D0 A9 
6F 85 B9 
B9 BF 00 
03 D0 F5 
0B A0 00 
FF C8 C0 
FF C9 00 

07 C9 59 
4C E2 FC 
B9 4B 0D 
50 00 F5 
R0 0C 20 

08 A0 02 
FF A9 



80 
18 
03 AO 



4E 

36 03 

AD 34 

34 

20 BD FF 
0F 20 6A 
0F 20 C3 
BO 76 0C 
02 BD 7D 
84 0C 8D 
BO 8B 0C 
B4 02 8E 
B0 02 A2 
B0 AD B3 
02 FO 
02 AD 
8D B3 02 
F0 11 C9 
02 2C B5 
02 F0 05 
CA 10 C4 
64 00 E8 
02 AC B0 
20 F0 04 
Bl 02 60 
lA IF 08 
23 00 00 



B4 

B4 



CC FF 
ID 20 
00 B9 
C9 00 
A0 17 
A9 00 
FB 2 

02 D0 
AE OF 
A0 00 
C8 CC 
A5 FB 
69 01 
FB A9 
0B A0 
FF C8 
FF 09 
20 40 
20 02 
4C FC 
D0 29 
20 Bl 
93 FF 
A8 FF 
AE FF 
11 00 

08 20 
20 93 
20 A3 
4C AE 
B9 18 
33 00 
F0 F9 
F0 06 
4C 20 
23 D2 
60 A9 
BD FF 
20 BA 
8D 35 
A9 3A 

03 69 
03 A2 
A9 0F 
FF 20 
FF 2 
80 05 
0C 8D 
C9 02 
8D CB 
B3 02 

09 8E 
02 DO 
57 00 
63 02 
C8 00 
60 F0 

02 30 
29 7F 
60 01 

03 10 
02 99 
C8 8C 
01 09 

10 11 
00 00 



A5 E2 
A5 28 
00 78 
C3 6F 
A9 20 
02 53 
E0 59 
00 61 
40 96 
20 39 
20 BB 
F4 24 

02 95 
B9 EB 
B0 58 
69 78 
85 3E 
9D 08 
00 70 

00 FF 
23 F3 
0B 70 
FF 0C 
0A 33 
EF 71 
FF IB 
A0 20 
C8 7A 
A9 B0 
09 35 
Bl 59 
FF 80 
FF 2 5 
FF B7 
0D 2F 
F5 43 
C9 F6 
4C 5F 
08 38 
FF 72 

01 82 
A9 2 4 
FF 7A 
3 CE 
8D 86 

03 95 
35 17 
A2 4 
C0 06 
3C E0 

02 60 
C7 5D 
80 F6 

02 22 
A2 55 
65 0F 
56 03 
90 57 
FO 21 
E3 ID 

03 75 
05 AB 
20 23 
00 21 
27 9D 
FB F3 
B0 15 
11 36 
18 00 
00 12 



0C89:00 
0C91: 10 
0C99:20 
0CAl:20 
0CA9-. 20 
0CB1; 32 
0CB9:32 
0CC1:26 
0CC9:20 
0CO1:20 
0CD9:4E 
0CE1:1C 
0CE9: 50 
0CF1:5O 
0CF9:47 
0001:46 
0009:56 
0011:53 
0019:96 
0021:43 
0029:44 
0031:20 
0D39:4E 
3D41:4F 
0D49:4E 
0D51:55 
0D59:20 
0D61:2O 
0D69:48 
0071:20 
0079:45 
0081:41 
0O89:4E 
0091:20 
0099:47 
0OA1:45 



00 14 
23 55 

31 38 

32 20 
32 20 
20 30 
20 30 
00 9A 
IC 53 
9A 44 
20 4 4 
50 52 
41 43 
55 54 
45 54 
20 49 
45 20 
20 53 
20 20 
4F 40 
20 21 
20 4D 
4F 54 
50 59 
00 96 
50 40 
31 35 
43 4F 
54 20 
20 43 
20 50 
54 49 
54 4C 
20 41 
48 54 
52 56 



14 14 12 

31 20 32 

20 30 42 

31 34 34 

30 20 55 
20 42 20 
55 49 20 
20 20 50 
4F 55 52 

49 53 4B 

52 49 56 
45 53 53 
45 00 9A 
20 IC 54 

20 9A 44 
4E 20 44 
IC 53 52 

50 41 43 
43 4F 50 
50 40 45 

21 21 00 
41 46 45 

48 45 52 
3F 20 10 
93 0D 20 

49 43 41 
34 31 0D 

50 59 52 

31 39 39 
4F 40 50 
55 42 4C 
4F 4E 53 
20 40 54 
40 4C 20 

53 20 52 
4 5 4 4 00 



11 11 
20 30 
2D 50 
55 31 
32 23 
50 20 
55 49 
55 54 

43 45 
20 49 
45 20 
20 53 
20 20 
41 52 
49 53 
52 49 
45 53 
45 00 
59 20 
54 45 
00 9A 
20 41 
20 43 
59 2F 
20 44 

54 45 
9A 20 
49 47 
32 0D 

55 54 
49 43 
20 49 

44 30 
52 49 

45 53 
00 EA 



SI 

72 
4C 
B6 
40 
7A 
41 
49 
18 
BF 
ID 
36 
6A 
IB 
5F 
06 
0F 
FA 
4D 
C4 
95 
12 
54 
89 
47 
55 
CC 
39 
F3 
AB 
B6 
B8 
B4 
81 
51 
6D 



Daniel Lightner is a regular contributor 
who lives in Sidney, Montana. 



RAILROAD SOLITAIRE 

By Donald G. Klich 

Have you ever been caught up in a sim- 
ple game that's so challenging that you 
have a hard time turning it off? Railroad 
Solitaire for the 128 is just such a game. 
This card game for one person was 
originally created to be used as a pas- 
time while traveling by train, since little 
space was available for conventional 
games of solitaire, The object of the 
game is ultimately to discard the entire 
deck while working with only the four cur- 
rently dealt cards. 

Typing It In 

Railroad Solitaire is written entirely in BA- 
SIC 7.0 and works with a 40-column 
screen. To help avoid typing errors, en- 
ter it with The Automatic Proofreader; 
see "Typing Aids" elsewhere in this sec- 
tion. Be sure to save a copy of the pro- 
gram before you exit Proofreader. 



Playing a Hand 

You may discard the middte two 
cards of the set of four that appear 
onscreen if the bracketing cards 
are of the same suit or value. If all 
four cards match in suit or value, 
then all four can be discarded. If 
you can't play, you must request an- 
other card. This card is placed at 
the right-hand side of the screen, 
and the card on the left is moved 
offscreen and temporarily "lost." 
When discards occur, lost cards 
from the left move back to fill the 
spaces. If you're lucky enough to 
have insufficient lost cards to fill in 
from the left, new cards will be 
dealt to fill in from the right. 

Onscreen prompts will tell you 
which keys to press to discard or re- 
quest cards. Unlike solitaire played 
with actual cards, this computerized 
version won't let you cheat or make 
an improper move. 

When you've gone through the 
deck, discarding all that you can, 
the game will end, and you'll be in- 
formed of any remaining cards. 
You'll then have the opportunity to 
play again and better your score. 

Be prepared for long hours of 
play to beat the odds. It took the au- 
thor an hour to win, just so he 
could test all the logic involved. 

RAILROAD SOLITAIRE 

EQ 10 REM COPYRIGHT 1992 - COM 

PUTE PUBLICATIONS ISTL L 

TD - ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 
PR 20 REM S$ CONTAINS SUIT CHA 

RACTERS 
MJ 30 REM SS$ CONTAISS SDIT PI 

XGLS 
KH 40 REM C CONTAINS SUIT COLO 

RS 
CX 50 REM VS CONTAINS CARD LAY 

OUT DATA 
SB 60 REM ON CONTAINS DECK CAR 

D VALUES 
FJ 70 REM OS CONTAINS DECK CAR 

D SUITS 
BF 80 REM WN CONTAINS WORK CAR 

D VALUES 
KB 90 REM WS CONTAINS WORK CAR 

D SUITS 
GH 100 REM DP/WP ARE THE DECK/ 

WORK POINTERS 
CJ 110 D1HS$(4) ,V$(13) ,0N(52) , 
0S(S2) ,WN(52) ,WS(52) :TS 
=52:Q=0 
QH 120 C(0)=ll;C(l)=l:C(2)=ll: 
C(3)=l:C(4)=2 



G-32 COMPUTE JULY 1992 



GQ 130 S$(0)-CHRS(154) :S$(1)=C 
HES(152) ;S${2)=CHR$tl47 
) :S5(3)=CHR${129) :SS(4) 
=CHR$ (64) 

GB 140 FORI=0TO51STEP13:FORJ=0 
T012:DN(r+J)=J:DS(I+J)= 
I/13:NEXTJ:NEXTI 

QG 150 VS(0)=''A 030B1656563236 

II 

HE 160 V$(l)="2 04081656563216 
3256" 

MH 170 V$(2)="3 05081656563216 
32563236" 

EP 180 V$(3)="4 06081656562416 
401624564056" 

FQ 190 VS(4)="5 07081656562416 
4016245640563236" 

RD 200 VS(5)="6 08081656562416 
40162456405624364036" 

HS 210 V$(6)="7 09081656562416 
401624 5640 5624364036324 
6" 

JG 220 VSC7)="8 10081656562416 
401624 5640 5 6 24 3 64 036 324 
63227" 

SA 230 VS(8)="9 11081656562416 
401624 56405624 294 029244 
340433237" 

BF 240 V${9)="1012081656562416 
4016 24 5 64 56 24294029244 
3404332223250" 

FA 250 VS(10)="J 0208165656" 

RK 260 VS{11)="Q 0208165656" 

KE 270 VS(12)="K 0208165656" 

MJ 280 VS(13)="{2 SHIFT-SPACE} 
00" 

BE 290 COLOR0,2:COLOR1, 1;C0L0R 
4,2:GOSUBa40:WIOTH2:GRA 
PHIC2,1,21 

SH 300 FORI=0TO3:CHAR1, 0,10,3$ 
(I) :DRAW1,3,82T04,82T04 
,83T03,83:SSHAPESSS (I) , 
0,80,7,e7:NEXTI:CHAHl,a 
,10," " 

DB 310 REM ****SHUFFLE DECK 

CH 320 PRINT"{BLK} {7 SPACES}!' 
H SHUFFLING THE DECK":F 
ORI = 1TO100:F = INT (RNDdl 
*51) :T=INT(RND(1)*51) :B 
N=DN(F) :BS=DS (F) :DN(F)= 
DN(T) :DS(F)=DS (T) :DN (TJ 
=BN:DS (T)=BS:NEXTI 
REM ****INITIAL SETUP 
FORDP=0TO3:WN (DP} =DN (DP 
) :WS (DP) =DS (DP) :NEXT:WP 
=DP:GOSOB770 
PRINT" {BLK}ENTER {CYNjC 
{BLKJTO RECEIVE A CARD 
":PRINT"ENTER {C¥N}2 
{BLK}TO DISCARD THE MID 
DLE CARDS":PRINT"ENTER 
{SPACE}{CYN}4 (BLK}TO D 
ISCRRD ALL CARDS" :IFDP> 
52THEN570 

MQ 360 GETKEYZ5:IFZS<>"C"THEN4 
20 

QG 370 IFDP=52THEN570:ELSE:GOS 
UB400: GRAPHIC 2, 1, 21:G0S 
UB770;GOTO350 



HA 330 
CS 340 



KK 350 



RB 


380 


EP 


390 


KB 


400 



MD 410 



MM 


420 


GE 


430 


DA 


440 


PE 


450 


DQ 


460 


JR 


470 


RQ 


480 


KQ 


490 


CS 


500 


DQ 


510 


SS 


520 


AX 


530 


JF 


540 


MX 


550 


FE 


560 



RB 570 



MX 


580 


CE 


590 


XD 


600 


OF 


610 


HH 


620 



GP 
KA 



630 
640 



KX 650 



DR 660 



BH 



GQ 



670 
680 



REM **** ROUTINE TO READ 

A CARD 
IFDP>=52THENWN(WP) =13:W 
S (WP) =4 :WP=WP+1: RETURN 
WN (WP) =DN (DP) :WS (WP) =DS 
(DP) :DP=DP+1:WP=WP+1:RE 
TURN 

REM ****SOUTINE TO REHO 
VE MIDDLE CARDS 
IFZ$<>"2"THEN470 
I FWN (WP-4 ) -WN (WP-1 ) THEN 
450 

I FWS (WP-4 ) OWS (WP-1 ) THE 
NSOUNDl,4 000,5:GOTO3 50 
WN (WP~3) =WN (WP-1) :WS (WP 
-3)=WS(WP-1) :WP=WP-2 
IFWP>3THENGRAPHIC2,1,21 
:GOSUB770:GOTO350:ELSEG 
OSUB390:GOTO460 
IFZ$<>"4"THENSOUNDl,4 00 
0,5:GOTO350 

REM ****ROUTINE TO REHO 
VE ALL FOUR CARDS 
IFWN (WP-4) OWN (WP-3 )THE 
N520 

I FWN (WP-3 ) < >WN (WP-2 ) THE 
N520 

I FWN (WP-2 ) =WN (WP-1 ) THEN 
WP=WP-4:GOTO460 
IFWS (WP-4) OWS (WP-3)THE 
N550 

IFWS (WP-3) OWS (WP-2)THE 
N550 

IFWS (WP-2)=WS (WP-1) THEN 
Wp=WP-4:GOTO460 
SOUNDl,4 000,5:GOTO350 
REM •****SAVE SCORE ROU 
TINE 

SOUND 1,8000, 5: PRINT" 
{BLK)GAME OVER. YOU HAD 
";WP-Q;" CARDS REMAINI 
NG";IFWP-Q<TSTHENTS=WP- 

Q 

PRINT"YOUH BEST SCORE I 
S ";TS 

Q=0:PRINT"PLA¥ AGAIN? Y 
/N" :GETKE¥ZS: IFZ$="Y"TH 
ENGRAPH1C2,1,21:GOTO320 
IFZS = "N"THENEND: ELSE 570 
REM ****DISPLAY A CARD 
C0L0R1,C(S) ;CHARl,X+l,Y 
+1,HID$(VS(V) ,1,2) :IFV= 
9THENCHftRl,X+6,Y+8,MIDS 
(V$(V) ,1,2) :ELSECHAR1,X 
+ 7,¥.+ 8,MIDS(VS (V> ,1,2) 
X=X*8:Y=Y*8 

FORI=0TO ( (VAL (MID$ (V$ (V 
> ,3,2) ) )-l) *4STEP4 
GSHAPESS$(S) ,X+VAL(MID5 
(VS(V) ,5 + 1,2)) ,Y+VAL(MI 
DS(VS(V) ,7+1,2)) :NEXTI 
COLOR1,1:BOX1,4+X,4+Y,6 
7+X,75+Y:COL0Rl,8:IFV<> 
10THEN690 

CIRCLE1,3 6+X,4 0+Y,12, 16 
,90,2 70:CIRCLE1,36+X,40 
+Y, 4, 8, 90, 270 
DRAW1,40+X,40+YTO40+X,2 
4+YTO4 8+X,24+YTO48+X,40 



GR 690 

HM 700 



HH 710 



CG 720 
BP 730 



DE 740 

SX 750 
BS 760 
MM 770 

SG 780 

DM 790 
BP 800 

FD 810 

XM 820 

FF 830 
AB 840 



AB 850 



FC 860 



EH 870 



+Y:DRAWl,24+X,40+YTO32+ 

X,40+Y:PAINT1,28+X,44+Y 

:GOTO750 

IFVO11THEN720 

CIRCLE1,36+X,40+Y,12,16 

:CIRCLEl,36+X,40+Y,4,8: 

PAINTl,28+X,40+Y 

DRAWl , 36+X, 54+YTO40+X,6 

0+YTO47+X,60+YTO3 9+X,51 

+Y!PAINTl,44+X,58+Y:GOT 

0750 

IFVO 12THENRETURN 

DRAW1,24+X,56+YT024+X,2 

4+YT03 2+X,24+YT032+X,56 

+YT024+X,56+Y:PAINT1,28 

+X, 28+Y: DRAWl, 32 +X,36+Y 

TO40+X,2 4+YTO4 8+X,2 4+YT 

032+X,4 4+Y:PAINTl,4 4+X, 

26+Y 

DRAWl, 32+X, 3 6+YTO40+X, 5 

6+YT048+X,56+YT036+X,32 

+Y:PAINT1,40+X,48+Y 

WIDTHl:BOXl,19+X,16+Y,5 

2+X,6 3+Y:WIDTH2:RETURN 

REM ****DISPLAY THE WIN 

DOW 

FORZ=0TO3:V=WN(WP-4+Z) r 

S=WS (WP-4+Z) :X=10*Z:Y=5 

:IFV=13THENQ=Q+1 

GOSUB620:NEXTZ: IFQ=4THE 

N820 

IFQ02THENRETURN 

IFWN CWP-4 ) =WN {WP-3 ) THEN 

820 

IFWS (WP-4) =WS (WP-3) THEN 

820 

PRINT"{5 SPACESlYOU WIN 

I I. Ill ": SOUND 1,10000,5:0 

OTO590 

REM ****GAME INSTRUCTIO 

NS 

GRAPHICS, 1: PRINT" {RED} 

{5 DOWNUll SPACES3RAIL 

ROAD SOLITAIRE": PRINT" 

{BLU}{2 D0WN}TH1S GAME 

{SPACE}WAS INVENTED FOR 

PLAYING ON A":PRINT"TR 
AIN WHERE SPACE TO SPRE 
AD OUT IS RARE." 
PRINT" (DOWN} THE IDEA 
F THE GAME IS TO DISCAR 
D THE":PRINT"CARDS THAT 

ARE BETWEEN END CARDS 
{SPACE}OF THE";PR1NT"SA 
ME VALUE OR SUIT. 
{2 SPACES }ALL FOUR CARD 
S CAN" 

PRINT" BE DISCARDED IF 
{SPACElTHEY ARE OF THE 
{SPACE } SAME" : PRINT"VALU 
E OR THE SAME SUIT.": PR 
INT" IF THERE IS NO PLA 
Y GET THE NEXT CARD.":P 
RIN3'"{3 DOWN}PRESS ANY 
{SPACE} KEY TO START" 
GETKEYZS: RETURN 



Donald G. Klich lives in Mount Pros- 
pect, Illinois. 

JULY 1992 COMPUTE G-33 



PROGRAMS 



128 GRAPHIC DUMP 

Donald G. Klich 

Here are two programs similar to the 128 
text screen clumps submitted by Bruce 
Bowden (Screen Dump 128, December 
1991). Rather than working with text, how- 
ever, these programs will dump bitmap- 
ped graphic screens to your printer. 

While you can't scale the pictures you 
send to a printer, you may select either of 
two different-sized printouts. Graphic 
Small prints a picture that is 40 x 25 
characters in size, and Graphic Large 
prints one 80 x 50 characters. Both of 
these utilities are easy to install and use. 
They're also fairly short, so it won't take 
you long to type them in. 

Typing It In 

Graphic Small and Graphic Large are 
both written in BASIC. To help avoid typ- 
ing errors, enter the programs with The 
Automatic Proofreader; see "Typing 
Aids" elsewhere in this section. Be 
sure to save copies of your programs 
before exiting Proofreader. 

Printing Pictures 

Load and run either program as you 
would a normal BASIC program. When 
you run either program, there will be a 
slight pause, and then the READY 
prompt will return. The programs use 
function keys f1 , f2, and f3 and put ma- 
chine language code in locations $1300- 
$13AS. After you run one of the pro- 
grams, you can then load and run an 
application that contains a graphic 
screen. When you reach the point that 
you'd like a printout of the screen, 
press the Stop key Make sure your print- 
er is turned on and ready. 

Small Pictures 

If you're using Graphic Small, proceed 
by pressing f1. (Be sure your printer is 
turned on and ready,) The screen will 
be garbled and then go blank, At this 
point, press f2. Shortly after that, your 
picture will start to print. When the print- 
out is complete, the picture onscreen 
will be ungarbled. 

Large Pictures 

To use Graphic Large, load and run 
the program and then run your graph- 
ics program as above. Press f1 and f2 
to start the printing process, but press 

6-34 COMPUTE JULY 1992 



f3 when the printing is complete to re- 
turn to the applications program. You 
can continue with your graphics pro- 
gram by entering a CONT command. 

These programs have been tested 
only on a Seikosha SP1000A and an Ep- 
son FX-80 printer, but they should 
work on other graphics printers, too. 
Make sure any printer interface you 
may be using is set for transparent 
mode. 

For those interested in modifying 
these programs for other printers, two 
printer-control commands are used in 
lines 60 and 70 in Graphic Small. The 
first instructs the printer to suppress 
the vertical spacing between lines, and 
the second precedes each print-line 
set to instruct the printer to print in 
graphics mode. Note that abbreviated 
commands (uppercase characters) are 
used at times so that the required BA- 
SIC code will fit in the special area re- 
served for function key definitions. 

GRAPHIC SMALL 

EQ 10 REM COPYRIGHT 1992 - COM 

PUTE PUBLICATIONS INTL L 

TD - ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 

CG 20 REM GRAPHIC SCREEN PRINT 

ER FOR COMMODORE 128 
SK 30 REM THIS PROGRAM, ONCE A 
CTIVATED WILL DUMP THE C 
URRENT GRAPHICS SCREEN 
JX 40 REM TO THE PRINTER DEVfC 
E 4. {2 SPACESJIT IS ACTI 
VATED BY THE Fl AND F2 K 
EYS, 
AB 50 REM IN A 40 BY 25 CHARAC 

TER DISPLAY 
SM 60 KEY1,"0P1,4:PR1,CH(27)CH 
(65)CH(8) :SYS4864:FAST"+ 
CHRS(13) I 
JX 70 KEY2,"FOA=8192T016191STE 
3 2 a : PR 1 , CH ( 2 7 ) CH ( 4 2 ) CH ( 4 
)CH (64)CH (1) ; :FOB=0TO319 
:PR1,CH (25 5-PEE (A+B) J ; :N 
E: PR1:NE: SLOW; SYS 4 86 4 ;CL 
01:END"+CHRS(13) 
GC 30 KEY3,"":KEY4,"":KEY5,"": 

KEY6,"":KEY7, KEY8,"" 

EB 90 F0RQ=4864T049B7:READZS:P 

OKE0,DEC(Z$) :NEXT 
GB 190 DATA 18,90,13,00,00,00, 
00,00,00,00,00,18,18,18 
,FF,FF,18,18,18,00,00,0 
fl,A9,00,8 5,FB,A9,20,85, 
FC,A0,00,A2,00,Bl,FB,99 
,fl3,13,C8,C0,08,D0,F6,A 
0,00,18,AD,15,13 
HP 110 DATA IE, 03, 13, 69, 00, E8, 
E0,08,F0,07,0A,8D,15,13 
,4C,2E,13,99,0B,13,A2,0 
0,8E,15,13,C8,C0,08,D0, 



DE,A2,00,A0,00,B9,0B,13 

,91,FB,EA,C8,C0,0e,D0,F 
5,A0,00,18,A9,08 
SM 120 DATA 65,FB,85,FB,A9,a0, 
65,FC,85,FC,C9,3F,D0,07 
,A5,FB, 9,40, 00,01,60, 4 
C,22,13 

GRAPHIC LARGE 

EQ 10 

CG 20 
SK 30 

EA 40 

RC 50 
FG 63 
ES 70 

KE 80 



REM COPYRIGHT 1992 - COM 
PUTE PUBLICATIONS INTL L 
TD - ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 
REM GRAPHIC SCREEN PRINT 
ER FOR COMMODORE 128 
REM THIS PROGRAM, ONCE A 
CTIVATED WILL DUMP THE C 
URRENT GRAPHICS SCREEN 
REM TO THE PRINTER DEVIC 
E 4. IT IS ACTIVATED BY 
{SPACE}THE Fl, F2 AND F3 

KEYS 
REM IN A 80 X 50 CHRRACT 
ER DISPLAY 

KEY4,"":KEY5,"":KEY6,"": 
KEY7,"":KEY8,"" 
KE Yl , "OPl , 4 : PRl ,CH ( 27 ) CH 
(65)CH(8) :SYS4864:FAST:A 
$=CH {27)+CH (42)+CH(4)+CH 
(128)+CH(2) :D=252:E=251: 
F=255"+CHR$(13) 
KEY2,"FOA=8192T016191STE 
3 20:FOC=1TO2:PR1,CH (13) ; 
AS; :FOB=0TO319: POKE, (F-P 
EE(A+B) ) :POK253,C:SYS498 
8:PR1,CH(PEE (D) ) ;CH (PEE( 
D) ) ; :NEB,C,A"+CHR$(13) 
BS 90 KE¥3,"SLOW:SYS4864:CL01" 

+CHR$ (13) 
JP 100 FORQ=4864TO5029:REAPZS: 

P0KEQ,DEC(Z$) :NEXT 
CG 110 DATA 18,90,13,00,00,00, 
00,00,00,00,00,18,18,18 
,FF,FF,18,18,18,00,00,0 
0,A9,00,85,FB,A9,2O,85, 
FC,A0,00,A2,00,B1,FB,99 
,03,13,C8,C0,0a,D0,F6,A 
0,00,18,AD,15,13 
DE 120 DATA IE , 03 , 13 , 69 , 00 , ES , 
E0,08,F0,07,0A,BD,15,13 
,4C,2E,13,99,0B,13,A2,0 
0,8E,15,13,C8,C0,08,D0, 
DE,A2,00,A0,00,B9,0B,13 
,91,FB,EA,C8,C0,08,D0,F 
S,A0,00,18,A9,08 
JP 130 DATA 65,FB,85,FB,A9,00, 
65,FC,85,FC,C9,3F,D0,07 
,A5,FB,C9,4 0,D0,01,60,4 
C,22,13,A5,FD,C9,01,F0, 
08,0 6,FB,06,FB,06,FB,06 
,FB,A9,00,S5,FC,A2,04,1 
8,06,FB,90,06,A9 
FD 140 DATA 03,05,FC,85,FC,CA, 
F0,07,06,FC,06,FC,18,90 
,EB,e0 

Donald Klich, who lives in Mount Pros- 
pect, Illinois, is the 128 programmer 
who wrote Railroad Solitaire. 



QUIZ WIZ 



By Rizwaan Ahmed Khan 
Quiz Wiz is a program for creating mul- 
tiple-choice quizzes on the 64. The pro- 
gram is so easy to use that even a begin- 
ner can use it without reading the instruc- 
tions. Just select the menu options. 

Quiz Wiz lets the parent or teacher en- 
ter questions and answers on a variety of 
subjects. The program then creates a 
quiz in multiple-choice format with the cor- 
rect answer and three wrong answers for 
each question. It provides the correct an- 
swers and a score when the student fin- 
ishes the quiz. 

When you enter a question and an- 
swer, you aren't required to supply three 
possible answers as alternate cfioices. 
The program asks the question and 
then supplies the correct answer along 
with three other choices that it selects at 
random from the other answers you've en- 
tered. The correct answer is never in a pre- 
dictable location. 

Entering the Program 

Quiz Wiz is written entirely in BASIC. 
To help avoid typing errors, enter it 
with The Automatic Proofreader; see 
"Typing Aids" elsewhere in this sec- 
tion. Be sure to save a copy ol the pro- 
gram before you exit Proofreader. 

Make New Entries 

When you first run the program, select 
the option to make new entries, You're 
then prompted to choose a subject. If 
the subject you want isn't on the 
screen, press the Up Arrow key and de- 
fine the subject of your choice. 

You may then enter questions and an- 
swers. Each question and answer is al- 
lowed a maximum of 80 characters. To 
exit during the input process, press the 
@ key and then press Return. 

Continue Making Entries 

Note the menu. If you wish to continue 
making entries, select the appropriate 
choice. If you select the option to 
make new entries, all work in memory 
will be erased. 

Correction Mode 

You can flip through your entries by 
pressing the < and > keys. When you 
find the question you want, press Re- 
turn, and a small menu will appear, 



This menu will allow you to fully edit or 
delete your entries. In this mode, you 
can rename the topic chosen by press- 
ing the R key. 

In correction mode you cannot enter 
the main menu by pressing the @ key. 
In this mode, you can use the cursor 
keys for more editing potential. After 
you've made any corrections, press Re- 
turn to exit to the main menu. 

Saving RIes 

When you've entered a minimum of 
four questions and their answers, you 
may then save your file. Save files by 
selecting that option from the main 
menu. If you try to save a file with a 
name that is already on the disk, the 
earlier version will first be scratched. 

Loading Files 

Load a saved file into memory anytime 
you want to take a quiz. Any entries 
that may still be in memory will be 
erased. After loading, you're automat- 
ically quizzed in multiple-choice format. 
To see a directory at any time, press 
the D key. 

Scratching Files 

Select this option from the main menu 
to erase any file on disk. You need on- 
ly enter the filename to have the pro- 
gram erase it. 

Quii Time 

A quiz begins right after loading, but if 
you've entered at least four questions, 
you can take a test immediately. Press 
the Commodore key; then press the let- 
ter next to the answer of youriChoice. 
If you answer incorrectly, the correct 
answer will be displayed for a short 
time. At the end of the quiz, your mis- 
takes will again be displayed. You can 
flip through them by pressing Return. 
This process lets you review your er- 
rors for as long as you wish. After re- 
viewing the final mistake, the comput- 
er will display your score. You may 
then exit to the main menu by pressing 
f1 or take the quiz again by pressing 
the Commodore key. 

Adding New Entries 

You can exit the quiz at any time by 
pressing fl. To enter more questions, 
select the option from the menu to con- 
tinue making entries. 



Tape Support 

Users with tape drives can easily alter 
the program to suit their needs. 
Change the OPEN commands in lines 
390 and 1007 to tape format. Then de- 
lete lines 62, 80, 915, 930, 935. 980. 
982, 985, 986, 987. 990, 992, 993. 
995, and 997. These lines contain the 
routines for calling the disk directory 
and for scratching files. 

QUIZ WIZ 

HE REM COPYRIGHT 1992 COMPOT 
E PUBLICATIONS IMTL LTD - 
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 

PB 1 DIMDS(200) :DIME$(200) :DIM 
FS (400) :PRINTCHR$ (8) :PRIN 
TCHRS (14) 

HQ 5 PRINT"{CLB}{WHT}{2 DOWN} 
{4 SPftCES}{RVS} 
{11 SPACES) {YEL}QUIZ WIZ 
iwHT){14 SPACES}":PRINT" 
{6 SPRCES}MENU:" 

XD 10 PRINT" {DOWN} {6 SPACES} 

{YEL} (RVS}PRESS (1) TO H 
AKE NEW ENTRIES. ":P0KE53 
281,2:POKE53280,6 

XJ 15 IFE$ (4)<>""THENPRINT" 
{DOWN} {6 SPACES) {RVS} 
{YEL}PRESS (2) TO SAVE E 
NTRIES." 

XD 20 PRINT"{DOWN} {6 SPACES] 

{RVS}{YEL}PRESS (3) TO L 
OAD ENTRIES, ":IFES(1)="" 
TKEN30 

FX 25 PRINT"{DOWN} {6 SPACES} 

{RVS} {YEL} PRESS (4) TO C 
ONTINUE{OFF} {19 SPACES} 
{RVS}MAKING ENTRIES." 

CQ 30 IFE$(1)<>""THENPRINT" 
{DOWN} {6 SPACES} {RVS} 
{YEL}PRESS {5) FOR CORRE 
CTION MODE." 

BK 35 PRINT" {DOWN} {6 SPACES} 

{RVS} {YEL}PRESS (6) TO S 
CRATCH FILES." 

BD 40 PRINT" {DOWN} {6 SPACES} 

fRVS}{CYN}PRESS Fl TO RE 
TURN TO MENU. {DOWN}" 

XG 45 PRINT"{12 SPACES}BY 

{2 SPACES 5RIZWAAN KHAN" 

DF 46 PRINT"{H0ME}{2 DOWN}":FO 
RI = ITO 19: PRINT "{WHT} 
{4 RIGHT}<+>{31 RIGHT} 
{+>{3 RIGHT}"; :NEXT 

JE 50 PRINT"{4 SPACES) {RVS} 
{33 SPACES) {OFF)"; 

BF 55 GETA$:IFA$="5"THENIFES (1 
) <>""THENJ=l:GOT0715 

BB 60 IFA$="1"THEN940 

HA 62 IFA$="D"THEN980 

AG 65 IFA5="2"ANDES t3)<>""THEN 
360 

MG 70 IFA$="3"THEN435 

JX 72 IFA$="L"THEN1000 

AF 75 IFA$="4"THENZE$="1":G0TQ 

JULY 1992 COMPUTE 6-35 



PROGRAMS 



175 

IFA$="6"THEN915 

IFPEEK (56321) =223AND=;S (4 

)<>""THENM=1:W=1:Q=0:GOT 

0520 

GOTO 5 5 

print'moff) cclr} [home) 
(3 down}{10 spaces}{pur) 
Crvs}define subject" 

13 PHINT"{DOWN) {11 SPftCES) 

{WHT)1)HRTH" 

PRINT'MDOWN) [11 SPACES} 

2)EC0NOMICS" 

PRINT'MDOWN} (11 SPACES} 

3) SCIENCE" 

PRINT'MDOWN} (11 SPACES} 

4)HIST0RY" 

PRINT'MDOWN} (11 SPACES} 

5)GE0GRAPHY" 

PRINT'MDOWN} (11 SPACES} 

6)ENGLISH" 

PRINT'MDOWN} (11 SPACES) 

I ) OTHER {2 SPACES}" 

GETA$:IFA$="1"THENN$="M 

ATH":GOT0175 

IFA$="2"THENN$="EC0N0MI 

CS":G0T0175 

IFA$=" 3 "THENNS=" SCIENCE 

": GOTO 175 

IFA$="4"THENNS= "HI STORY 

": GOTO 17 5 

IFAS="5"THENNS="GE0GRAP 

HY":GOT0175 

IFA$="6"THENN5="ENGLISH 

": GOTO 17 5 
IFAS=CHR$ (133)THENDB5=" 

":G0T05 
5 IFA$="|"THENINPUT"SOBJE 

CT";NS:GOT0175 
GOTO130 
5 PRINT"{CLR5 {BLOj{RVS} 

{40 SPACES}": IFDB$="1"T 

HENDBS="":G0T05 
ED 180 1FZES="1"THENX=X+1:ZE$= 

M II 

HD 185 PRINT"{GRN}(HOME} (RVS} 
( SPACE }QUESTION NUMBER" 
X"(YEL}SUBJECT:"NS"" 

GJ 190 PRINT" CWHT} (HOME} 

^~- (2 D0WN}(5 SPACES}ENTEH 

QUESTION {9 TO QUIT) " 
(3 SPACES) :POKE53280, 2 

EQ 191 IFDB$="1"THENPRINT" 
(YEL}{H0ME}{3 DOWN} 
(2 RIGHT}"DAS"":PRINT'' 
{HOME} (3 DOWN}"; 

HS 195 INPUTD$ (X) : IFDS (X)="(a"A 
NDDB$="1"THEN190 

SD 245 IFD$(X)="ia"ANDX<>lTHENX 
=X-1:ZES="1":GOT05 

RF 246 IFDS(X) ="@"ANDX=1THEN5 

RE 247 IFDB$="1"ANDD${X)<>""TH 
ENDS (X)=LEFTS (DS (X) ,80) 
:G0TO845 

PS 25H IFDS {X)<>""THEND$(X)=LE 
FTS (D$(X) ,80) :GOT0275 

XS 255 PRINT"(CLR} {HOME) {BLU} 
{RVS} {40 SPACES }":G0T01 

-G-36 COMPUTE JULY 1992 



Kp 80 

MJ 85 



EK 90 

XQ 9 5 



XQ 10 

PE 10 

HF 11 

KS 11 

HF 12 

BA 12 

SD 12 

XS 13 

BE 13 

HG 14 

BS 14 

QG 15' 

BA 15 

RS 16 

XX 16 

KR 17 

AG 17 



KD 275 PRINT:PRINT"{H0ME) 

{13 DOWN} {WHT} {DOWN} 
(4 SPACES }ENTER ANSWER" 
HH 276 IFDB9="1"THENPRINT" 
{YEL}{H0HE}{15 DOWN} 

{2 RIGHT}"EA$"":PRINT" 

{HOME} {15 DOWN}"; 
XX 280 INPUTE$(X) : IFE$(X)""e''A 

NDDBS="1"THEN275 
XQ 285 IFDB$="1"ANDES (X)<>""TH 

ENES(X)=LEFT$(ES(X) ,80) 

JG0TO84 5 
RA 290 IFES (X)="@"THEN5 
XX 335 IFES (X)<>""THENES (X)=LE 

FT${ES(X) ,80) :X='X + 1:G0T 

0175 
GR 340 GOT0275 
PR 360 NAHS="": PRINT" (CLR) 

{DOWN} TYPE IN FILE NAM 

E TO SAVE":INPUTNAM$:IF 

NAM$=""THEN5 
KJ 390 KS="":OPEN7,8,0,NAMS:IN 

PUT»7,K$:IFK$»""THENCL0 

SE7:GOTO405 
JS 395 CLOSE7:PRINT"{2 DOWN} S 

CRATCH I NG OLD FILE.": FT 

$="S0: ":FT$=FT$+NAM$ 
FH 400 OPEN15,8,15,FTS:CLOSE15 
SG 405 OPEN7,8,l,NAHS:PRINT" 

(CLR} (HOME} (6 DOWN} 

(6 SPACES} {WHT}SAVING : 
"NAM$"":PRINT#7,NS:PRI 

NT#7,X 
BQ 410 F0RJ=lT0X:PRINTt7,DS (J) 

SNEXTJ:ZE$="1" 
MP 4X5 F0RJ = 1T0X:PRINT#'',E$ (J) 

:NEXTJ:CLOSE7:M=1:FX=0: 

Q = 
EH 430 PRINT"{CLR}{HOME) 

{11 D0WN}{6 SPACES}*** 

{SPACE)DATA has BEEN SA 

VED ***" 
KF 431 FORI=1TO2000:NEXTI:GOTO 

520 
PR 435 PRINT"(CLR} (RVS}{WHT} 

(DOWN) LOAD ERASES ANY 

(SPACE}WORK IN' MEMORY. 

{4 SPACES} ARE YOU SURE 

(SPACE) (Y/N) " 
DO 440 GETA$:IFA$="N"THEN5 
PA 445 IFA$="Y"THEN1000 
DA 450 GOTO440 
DP 520 ZX=X:PRINT"{CLR}{HOME} 

{ SPACE} SCO RE={ RVS )"Q" 

{OFF) (4 SPACES}QUESTION 
NUMBER={RVS}"W"{OFF}" 
EB 525 PRINT"TOTAL NUMBER OF Q 

UESTIONS="X"":POKE53280 

,6:POKE53281,6 
HK 530 PRINT"|YEL} (RVS) 

(40 SPACES)"; 
JG 535 PRINT"{UP}{3 SPACES) 

(RVS} SUBJECT : "NS"" 
CR 540 PRINT"(WHT}QUESTI0N: 

(GRN) (RVS}"DS(H) "{OFF} 

{DOWN}";FS 
KB 545 Y=INT(4*RND(1) ) +1 



RA 550 



FQ 555 

EM 556 

RH 560 

HA 5 62 

QB 565 

GJ 567 



BG 568 

MH 570 
RF 571 
JD 572 

KS 575 
SF 576 
KM 57 7 

GF 580 
SS 581 
HP 582 



T=INT ( (X+1 
:U=INT ( (X+ 
1:V=INT ( (X 
+ 1 

IFES(M)=ES 
(U)ORE$(U) 
IFES(V)=ES 
(T)ORES{V) 
IFY=lTHEN5 
IFY=3THEN5 
IFY=2THEN5 
PRINT" (RVS 
$(T) "{DOWN 
(RVS) (WHT) 
{DOWN}": PR 
{WHT)C <8> 



AH 


585 


XJ 


590 


SO 


595 


CS 


600 



GX 605 

AD 610 

FQ 615 
BP 620 



BR 625 



GP 630 



-1)*RND(1) )+i 
1-1)*RND(1) )+ 
+1-1)*RND(1) ) 

(T)ORES (M) =ES 
=ES (T)THEN55a 
(M)ORES(V)=E$ 
=E5(U)THEN550 
75 
70 
30 

}{wht3a •{8}"E 
}": PRINT" 
B <8>"ES(U)" 
I NT "(RVS) 
"E${V) "(DOWN) 



PRINT "{RVS} {WHT }D -{8}"E 
$ {H) " {DOWN} ":L$="D" :G0T 
58 5 

PRINT" {RVS} {WHT) A {8}"E 
S (T) "{DOWN}" 
PRINT"(RVS) (WHT}B <8>"E 
S (U)"{DOWN)" 
PEINT"{HVS} (WHT}C {8}."E 
S (M) "{D0WN}":LS="C":PRI 
NT"{RVS} {WHT}D {B}"ES(V 
) "{D0WN}":GOTO585 
PR I NT "(WHT) {RVS} A <8}"E 
S (M) "{DOWN}" 
PRINT"{RVS} (WaT}B <a}"E 
S (T) "{DOWN}" 
PRINT"{RVS} {WHT}C {S}"! 
$ (U) "(D0WN}":LS="A":PRI 
NT"{RVS} {WHT)D 'C8>"E${V 
) "{D0WN}":GOTO585 
PRINT"(WHT} (RVS}A {8}"E 
S (U) "(DOWN}" 
PRINT" (RVS} {WHT} B {8>"E 
S(M) "(DOWN}" 
PRINT"{RVSHWHT}C {8}"E 
$(T) "(D0WN)":L5="B":PRI 
NT"{RVS}{WHT)D {8>"ES(V 
) "(DOWN}":GOT0585 
GET AS: IFAS=""THEN5a5 
IFAS=CHRS (133)THENFX=0: 
Q=0:GOTO5 

IFAS<>"A"ANDA$<>"B"ANDA 
S<>"C"ANDAS<>"D"THEN585 
IFAS=L5THENQ=Q+1: PRINT" 
{WHT|{2 SPACES) (RVS}COR 
RECT! !"; :FORJ=1TO500:NE 
XTJ:GOTO610 
GOT0655 

M=H+1:IFW=ZXTHENAD=FX-1 
:FX=0:GOTO880 
W=W+1:GOTO520 
PRINT" {CLR} (HOME) 
{2 DOWN) (OFF) {WHT} YOU 
{SPACE}SCORED(WHT} (RVS) 
"Q"{0FF}0UT OF{WHT} 
{RVS}"X"(0FF} QUESTIONS 
":POKE53281,3 
IFX/2<=QTHENPRINT" 
{2 D0WN}(2 SPACES}{RVS} 
YOU PASSED!" :G0TO632 
PRINT" {DOWN} (RVS }£HAHE 
ON YOU, YOU FAILED! ! !" 



HR 632 PRINT" {DOWN}{RVS}PRESS XP 780 

'Fl' TO EXIT." OF 782 

HF 635 PRIOT"{DOWN) {RVS}PRESS GF 783 

{ SPACE fcOHHODORE KEY TO JH 785 
DO THE TEST AGAIN"jGOT JM 786 

0640 BX 788 

DS 640 GETA$:IFA$=CHRS (133)THE 

N5 
GP 645 IFPEEK(56321)=223THENM= EG 790 

1:W=1:Q=0:GOTO520 
KS 650 GOTO640 GR 795 

EP 655 PRINT"{RVSlXNCORRECT! 

{OFF) THE ANSWER IS":FS JD 800 

(FX)=D$(M) :FX=FX+1:FS (F 

X)=E5 (M) :FX=FX+1 DB 805 

FD 660 IFY=1THENPRINT"{RVS}A 

{OFF)"E$ (M) "";F$:GOT067 

5 AD 815 

ES 665 IFY=2THENPRINT"{RVS}B 

{OFF}"E$(H) "";F5:GOT067 GC 820 

5 
BE 670 PRINT'MRVSIC (0FF}"ES(M MK 825 

)"";F$:G0T0 6 75 
AH 675 FORJ=1TO2:POKE54276,0:P AP 830 

OKE54 27 7,0: POKE 5 4 272,0: 

P0KE54296,1S BD 836 

JX 680 POKES4277,129:POKE54276 

,23 PR 840 

RG 685 POKE54273,137:POKE54272 QF 845 

,43:NEXTJ:FORI=1TO1500: 

NEXTI:GOTO610 KM 850 

EB 690 POKE1024,82:POKE1025,65 KJ 855 

:POKE1026,75:POKEi027,7 FF 860 

2:POKE1028,65:POKE1029, 

78 ER 865 

JH 691 GOT0585 
HR 715 PRINT"(YELJ{CLR}{HOHE) 

{RVS}{11 SPACES }CORRECT SO 870 

ION MODE {14 SPACES)"; 
BF 720 PRINT" EHVS){WHT) TOTAL 
QUESTIONS ENTERED="X"" 

:POKE53281,6:POKE53280, XK 875 

2 
OK 725 PRINT" {RVS) {CYN}QUESTI 

ON NO. "J" {GRN} SUBJECT:" EE 883 

N$"{DOWN)" PM 385 

DB 730 PRINT"{YEL){RVS}QUESTIO 

N:<8}"D$ (J)"";PRINT 
XS 735 PRINT"{YEL) {RVS)ANSWER: 

{8>"E${J)"" CS 890 

SB 740 PRINT"{DOWbJ} {RVS){YEL} 

PRESS '<> 'TO FLIP THROOG 

H ENTRIES." FP 895 

EP 741 PRINT" {RVS}{WHT}PRESS' 

RETURN 'FOR CORRECTION." 
FA 743 PRINT" { RVS ) {WHT ) PRESS ' 

R'TO RENAME SUBJECT." AR 9C 
GE 745 GETAS: IFAS=CHRS (13)THEN 

VB=X:X=J:DB$="1":GOT078 QS 905 

8 MK 910 

BD 750 IFAS="."THEN782 RK 915 

HD 755 IFA$=CHR$ (133)THENDBS=" 

":G0TO775 
HG 760 IFAS="R"THENA$="":DBS=" 

l":GOT095 XF 920 

HH 765 IFA$=","THEN785 
RJ 770 G0T0745 
DM 775 IFVB>0THENX=VB:GOTO5 



GOTO 5 

IFJ=XTHENJ=1 :GOT0715 
J=J+l:GOT0715 
IFJ=1THENJ=X:G0T0715 
J=J-1:G0T0715 
PRINT"{DOWN) <6}{RVSl^L 
EASE SELECT — 
{3 SPACES)" 

PRINT" {RVS}(1) ALTER Q 
UESTION." 

PRINT" {RVS) (2) ALTER A 
NSWER. {2 SPACES}" 
PRINT" {RVS) (3) ALTER B 
0TH.C4 SPACES)" 
PRINT" {RVS) (4) DELETE 
{SPACE}B0TH. {3 SPACES}" 
:DA$=D$(X) :EA$=ES (X) 
GETAS :IFA$="1"THENS=1:P 
RI NT " { CLR } " : GOTO 19 
IFAS="2"THENS=2:PRINT" 
{CLR}":GOT0275 
IFA$="3"THENS=3:PRINT" 
{CLR)":GOTO190 
IFAS="4"THEN«K=VB-J:DB$ 
="":GOTO860 

IFA$=CHRS (133)THENDBS=" 
":X=VB:G0T05 
GOT0815 

IFS=10RS=2THENX=VB:DB$= 
"":G0T05 

IFS=3THENS=S+1:G0T027 5 
X=VB:DB$="":G0T05 
IFJ=1ANDES (J+1) =""THENR 
UN 

IFE$ (J + 1)=""THEND$(J)=" 
":ES (J)="":VB = VB-1:X = VB 
: GOTO 5 

PRINT" (2 DOWN) 
{2 SPACES) {WHT)DELETING 
. ...":F0RI=1T0MK:AD$=D$ 
(J+1) :AVS=ES (J+l) 
DS (J) =AD$:ES (J) =AVS: J=J 
+1:NEXTI:VB=VB-1:X=VB:E 
S (J) ="":D$ (J) ="":G0T05 
IFF$ (FX) =""THEN620 
PRINT" (CLR) (OFF) (HOME} 
{2 DOWN) {BLK)THE ONES 
{SPACE} YOU GOT WRONG AR 
E-(DOWN}":POKE53281,l 
PRINT" (RED)QUESTION - 
{SPACE)"F$ (FX) "";F$:FS( 
FX)="":PX=FX+1 
PRINT" ANSWER - "F5(FX) 
"";FS:F$(FX)="":PRINT" 
(2 DOWN) (RVS){CYN}PRES 
S RETURN" 

GETA$:IPA$<>CHRS (13)THE 
N900 

IFAD=FXTHENFX=0:GOTO620 
FX=FX+l:GOTOa80 
PRINT" (CLR) {DOWN} NAME 
(SPACE}OF FILE TO SCRAT 
CH":INPUTFR9:IFFR$=""TH 
ENS 

PRINT"{DOWN) I_NSERT DIS 
K CONTAINING FILE AND P 
RESS{3 SPACES} {RVS}RETU 
RN" 



AF 


950 


KX 


955 


DF 


960 


DS 


965 



PQ 925 GETA$:IFA$<>CHRS(13)THE 

N925 
AE 930 FT$="S0:":FTS=FTS+FRS:O 

PEN15,9,15,FTS:CLOSE15 
RS 93 5 PRINT" {2 DOWN) 

{2 SPACES}{RVS}{WHT}FIL 
E HAS BEEN SCRATCHED" :F 
ORI=1TO3000;NEXTI:GOTO5 
XX 940 PRINT"{CLR){DOWN){WHT) 
(SPACE} {RVS}MAK1NG NEW 
(SPACE}ENTRIES WILL ERA 
SE ANY OLD{OFF} 
{3 SPACES) {RVS}ENTRIES 
(SPACE) IN MEMORY" 
AQ 945 PRINT" (RVS) {WHT)ARE YO 
U SURE (Y/N)" 
GETAS: IFAS="N"THEN5 
IFA$="Y"THEN965 
GOTO 950 

CLR:DIMD5{5a0) :DIME$(50 
0) :X=l:GOT095 
KK 970 PRINT"{DOWN) (2 SPACES) 
{RVS)FILE NOT FOUND":OP 
EN15,8,15,"UJ":F0RI=1T0 
2003 :NEXTI:CL0SE15: RUN 
MB 980 I=1:PRINT"{WHT) {CLR}":0 
PEN2,8,0,"$":GET#2,A$:G 
ET#2,AS 
CM 982 IFI = 22THEm=l:GOT0992 
DD 985 GET#2,LS:GETf 2,L$:IFST= 

64THENCLOSE2:GOT0992 
XJ 986 GET#2,LBS:GET#2,HBS:LN= 
ASC (LBS+CHR$ (0) ) +256*AS 
C(HBS+CHR$ (0) ) 
PRINT LN; 

GET#2,AS: IFAS=""THENI=I 
+1:PRINTCHRS (13) ; :G0T09 
82 

PRINTA$; :GOT0983 
PRINT" {DOWN} {RVS} PRESS 

ANY KEY" 
GETAS: IFAS=""THEN9 93 
IFST<>64THENPRINT"{CLR) 
":GOT0985 
GOTO 5 
CLR:DIMD$ (200) : DIMES (2 
00} :DIMFS (400) :PRINTCH 
RS (8) :PRINTCHRS{14) 
MH 1005 PRINT"{CLR} {RVS){WHT} 
TYPE IN FILENAME TO LO 
AD" : INPUTNAMS: IFNAMS=" 
"THENRUN 
EK 1007 NS="":OPEN7,8,0,NAM$:I 

NPUT#7,NS 
EK 1008 INPUT#7,X:IFNS=""THENC 

LOSE7:GOTO970 
BR 1009 PRINT" (CLR) {HOME} 

(5 DOWN) {4 SPACES}LOAD 
ING : {RVS)"NAM$"" , 
HB 1010 F0RJ = 1T0X:INPUT#7,DS (J 

) :NEXTJ:ZES="1" 
JC 1012 F0RJ=1T0X:INPUT#7,E$(J 
) :NEXTJ:CL0SE7:M=1:FX= 
0:Q=0:W=1:GOTO520 



MM 


987 


DD 


988 


CD 


990 


KD 


992 


CX 


993 


QJ 


995 


JM 


997 


FH 


1000 



Rizwaan Ahmed Khan 
Taihape, New Zealand. 

JULY 1992 COMPUTE 



ives in 

□ 

G-37 



MLX 



Machine Language Entry Program 
MLX for Commodore 64 
Ottis R. Cowper 



Type in and save some copies of 
MLX — you'll want to use it to enter fu- 
ture ML programs from Gazette, When 
you're ready to enter an ML program, 
load and run MLX. It asks you for a start- 
ing address and an ending address. 
These addresses appear in the article 
accompanying the MLX-format pro- 
gram listing you're typing. 

If you're unfamiliar with machine lan- 
guage, the addresses (and all other val- 
ues you enter in MLX) may appear 
strange. Instead of the usual decimal 
numbers you're accustomed to, these 
numbers are in hexadecimal—a base 
16 numbering system commonly used 
by ML programmers. Hexadecimal — 
hex for short — includes the numerals 0- 
9 and the letters A-F. But even if you 
know nothing about ML or hex, you 
should have no trouble using MLX. 

After you've entered the starting and 
ending addresses, you'll be offered the 
option of clearing the workspace. 
Choose this option if you're starting to 
enter a new listing. If you're continuing 
a listing that's partially typed from a pre- 
vious session, don't choose this option. 
A functions menu will appear. The first 
option in the menu is Enter Data. If 
you're just starting to type in a pro- 
gram, pick this. Press the E key and 
type the first number in the first line of 
the program listing. If you've already 
typed in part of a program, type the 
line number where you stopped typing 
at the end of the previous session {be 
sure to load the partially completed pro- 
gram before you resume entry), !n any 
case, make sure the address you en- 
ter corresponds to the address of a 
line in the listing you are entering. Oth- 
erwise, you'll be unable to enter the da- 
ta correctly. If you pressed E by mis- 
take, you can return to the command 
menu by pressing Return alone when 
asked for the address. (You can get 
back to the menu from most options in 
the program by pressing Return with 
no other inpuL) 

Entering a Listing 

Once you're in Enter mode, MLX 
prints the address for each program 
line for you. You then type in all nine 
numbers on that line, beginning with 
the first two-digit number after the co- 
lon (:), Each line represents eight data 
bytes and a checksum. Although an 

G-38 COMPUTE JULY 1992 



MLX-format listing appears similar to 
the "hex dump" listings from a ma- 
chine language monitor program, the 
extra checksum number on the end al- 
lows MLX to check your typing. 

When you enter a line, MLX recalcu- 
lates the checksum from the eight 
bytes and the address and compares 
this value to the number from the ninth 
column. If the values match, you'll 
hear a bell tone, the data will be add- 
ed to the workspace area, and the 
prompt for the next line of data will ap- 
pear. But if MLX detects a typing error, 
you'll hear a low buzz and see an er- 
ror message. The line will then be re- 
displayed for editing. 

Invalid Characters Banned 

Only a few keys are active while you're 
entering data, so you may have to un- 
learn some habits. You do not type 
spaces between the columns; MLX au- 
tomatically inserts these for you. You 
do not press Return after typing the 
last number in a line; MLX automatical- 
ly enters and checks the line after you 
type the last digit. 

64 MLX Keypad 



7 


8 


9 













4 


5 


6 


F 






V 


I 





P 










I 




2 


3 




E 






J 




K 


L 




= 










A 




B 




C 


D 






M 




■ 




' 


/ 




^ 

































Space 









Only the numerals 0-9 and the letters 
A-F can be entered. If you press any 
other key (with some exceptions noted 
below), you'll hear a warning buzz. To 
simplify typing, a numeric keypad func- 
tion is included. The keypad is active 
only while entering data. Addresses 
must be entered with the normal letter 
and number keys. The figure beiow 
shows the keypad configuration. 

MLX checks for transposed charac- 
ters. If you're supposed to type in AO 



and instead enter OA, MLX will catch 
your mistake. There is one error that 
can slip past MLX: Because of the 
checksum formula used, MLX won't no- 
tice if you accidentally type FF in 
place of 00, and vice versa. And 
there's a very slim chance that you 
could garble a line and still end up 
with a combination of characters that 
adds up to the proper checksum. How- 
ever, tfiese mistakes should not occur 
if you take care while entering data. 

Editing Features 

To correct typing mistakes before fin- 
ishing a line, use the Inst/Del key to de- 
lete the character to the left of the cur- 
sor. If you mess up a line badly press 
CIr/Home to start the line over. The Re- 
turn key is also active, but only before 
any data is typed on a line. Pressing Re- 
turn at this point returns you to the com- 
mand menu. After you type a charac- 
ter, MLX disables Return until the cur- 
sor returns to the start of a line. Remem- 
ber, press CIr/Home to quickly get to a 
line-number prompt. To make correc- 
tions in a line that MLX has redisplayed 
for editing, compare the line on the 
screen with the one printed in the list- 
ing and then move the cursor to the mis- 
take and type the correct key. The cur- 
sor- left and -right keys provide the 
normal cursor controls. (The Inst/De! 
key now works as an alternative cursor- 
left key.) You cannot move left beyond 
the first character in the line. If you try 
to move beyond the rightmost charac- 
ter, you'll reenter the line. During edit- 
ing. Return is active; pressing it tells 
MLX to recheck the line. You can 
press the CIr/Home key to clear the en- 
tire line if you want to start from 
scratch or if you want to get to a line- 
number prompt to use Return to get 
back to the menu. 

Display Data 

The second menu choice, Display Da- 
ta, examines memory and shows the 
contents in the same format as the pro- 
gram listing (including the checksum). 
When you press D, MLX asks you for a 
starting address. Be sure that the start- 
ing address you give corresponds to a 
line number in the listing. Otherwise, 
the checksum display will be meaning- 
less, MLX displays program lines until 
it reaches the end of the program, at 



which point the menu is redisplayed. 
You can pause the display by pressing 
the space bar. (IVILX finishes printing 
the current line before halting.) Press 
the space bar again to restart the dis- 
play. To break out of the display and 
get back to the menu before the end- 
ing address is reached, press Return. 

Other Menu Options 

Two more menu selections let you 
save programs and load them back in- 
to the computer. These are Save File 
and Load File. When you press S or L, 
MLX asks you for the filename. You'll 
then be aslied to press either D or T to 
select disk or tape. 

You'll notice the disk drive starting 
and stopping several limes during a 
load or save. This is normal behavior. 
MLX opens and reads from or writes to 
the file instead of using the usual 
LOAD and SAVE commands. Also 
note that the drive prefix 0: is added to 
the filename (line 750}, so this should 
not be included when entering the 
name. This also precludes the use of 
@ for save-with-replace, so be sure to 
give each version saved a different 
name. 

Remember that MLX saves the en- 
tire workspace area from the starting ad- 
dress to the ending address, so the 
save or load may take longer than you 
might expect if you've entered only a 
small amount of data from a long list- 
ing. When you're saving a partially com- 
pleted listing, make sure to note the ad- 
dress where you stopped typing. 

MLX reports the standard disk or 
tape error messages if any problems 
are detected during the save or load. 
It also has three special load error mes- 
sages: INCORRECT STARTING AD- 
DRESS, which means the file you're try- 
ing to load does not have the starting 
address you specified when you ran 
MLX; LOAD ENDED AT address. 
which means the file you're trying to 
load ends before the ending address 
you specified when you started MLX; 
and TRUNCATED AT ENDING AD- 
DRESS, which means the fife you're try- 
ing to load extends beyond the ending 
address you specified when you start- 
ed MLX. If you see one of these mes- 
sages and feel certain that you've load- 
ed the right file, exit and rerun MLX, 
being careful to enter the correct start- 



ing and ending addresses. 

The Quit menu option has the obvi- 
ous effect— it stops MLX and enters BA- 
SIC. The Run/Stop key is disabled, so 
the option lets you exit the program 
without turning off the computer. (Of 
course, Run/Stop-Restore also gets 
you out.) You'll be asked for verifica- 
tion; press Y to exit to BASIC, or press 
any other key to return to the menu. Af- 
ter quitting, you can type RUN again 
and reenter MLX without losing your da- 
ta, as long as you don't use the Clear 
Workspace option. 

The Finished Product 

When you've finished typing all the da- 
ta for an ML program and saved your 
work, you're ready for the results. Re- 
fer to the corresponding article for 
details on loading and running the 
program. 

An Ounce of Prevention 

Don't take chances— use The Automat- 
ic Proofreader to type the new MLX, 
and then test your copy thoroughly be- 
fore first using it to enter any significant 
amount of data. Make sure all the 
menu options work as they should. En- 
ter fragments of the program starting at 
several different addresses; then use 
the display option to verify that the da- 
ta has been entered correctly. Test the 
save and load options to ensure that 
you can recall your work from disk. 

64 MLX 

SS 10 REM VERSION 1.1: LINES B 
30,950 MODIFIED, LINES 4 
85-487 ADDED ' 
EK 100 POKE 56,50:CLR:DIM INS, 

I,J,A,B,A$,B$,A(7) ,NS 
DM 110 C4=48:C6=16:C7=7:Z2=2:Z 

4 =254 iZ 5=255: 26=256 ;Z7= 

127 
CJ 120 FA=PEEK(45)+Z6*PEEK(46) 

:BS=PEEK{55) +Z6*PEEK(56 

) :HS="0123456789ABCDEP" 
SB 130 R9=CHR$fl3) :LS""{LEFT}" 

:S$ = " ":DS=!CHR$ (20) :Z$ = 

CHR$(0):T5="{13 RIGHT)" 
CO 140 SD=54272:FOR I=SD TO SD 

+23:POKE I,0:NEXT:POKE 

{SPACB}SD+24,15:POKE 78 

8,52 
FC 150 PRINT"{CLR}"CHRS(142)CH 

R$(8):P0KE 53280, 15:P0K 

E 53281,15 
EJ 160 PRINT TS" {RED}{RVS} 

{2 SPACESX8 @} 



{2 SPACES) "SPC (28) " 

{2 SPACBSHOFF}{BLU} ML 
X II {RED}fRVS} 
(2 SPACES } "SPC ( 28 ) " 
{12 SPACES} tOLU}" 

FR 170 PRINT" (3 DOWN} 

{3 SPACES}C0MPUTE1 'S MA 
CHINE LANGUAGE EDITOR 
{3 DOWN}" 

JB 180 PRINT" tBLK}STARTING ADD 
RESS<4>"; :GOStJB300: SA=A 
D:GOSU81040:IF F THEN18 


GF 190 PRINT"{BLK}{2 SPACES}EN 
DING ADDRESS^4}"; :GOSUB 
300: EA=AD;G0SUB 103 : IF 
CSPACE}F THEN190 

KB 200 INPUT" {3 DOWN}{BLK}CLEA 
R WORKSPACE [Y/N]{4J";A 
$:IF LEFT${AS,1) <>"Y"TH 
EN220 

PG 210 PRINT" {2 DOWN} {BLUlWORK 
ING. . ."; :FORI=BS TO BS+ 
EA-SA+7:P0KE I,0:NEXT:P 
HINT "DONE" 

DR 220 PRINTTAB(10) "{2 DOWN] 
{BLK}(RVS} MLX COMMAND 
{SPACE)HENU {D0WN}<4>"; 
PRINT TS"{RVS}E{OFF}NTE 
R DATA" 

PRINT T$"CRVS}dCOFF}ISP 
LAY DATA": PRINT TS" 
(RVS}L{OFF}OAD FILE" 
PRINT T$"CRVS}S[0FF}AVE 

FILE":PRINT TS"(RVS}Q 
(0FF}UIT{2 00WN}{BLK)" 
GET A$:IF AS=N5 THEN250 
A=0:FOR 1=1 TO 5:IF AS= 
MID$ ("EDLSQ",I,1)THEN A 
=1: 1=5 

NEXT:ON A GOTO420, 610, 6 
90,700,280:GOSUBia60:GO 
TO250 

PRINT"{RVS} QUIT "tINPU 
T"{D0WN){4JARE YOt; SURE 
[Y/N]";A$:IF LEFT$(A$, 
1)<>"Y"THEN220 
POKE SD+24,0:END 
INS=NS:AD=0:INPUTINS:IF 
LEN(IN$) 04THENRETURN 
B$=INS:GOSUB320:AD=A;B$ 
=MIDS(IN$,3) :GOSUB320:A 
D=AD*256+A:RETURN 

PP 320 A=g:FOR J=l TO 2:AS=MID 
5 (B$,J,1) :B=ASC(AS) -C4+ 
(A$>"@")*C7:A=A*C6+B 

JA 330 IF B<0 OR B>15 THEN AD= 
0:A=-1:J=2 

GX 340 NEXT: RETURN 

CH 350 B=INT(A/C6) :PRINT MIDS( 
H$,B+1,I) ; :B=A-B*C6:PRI 
NT MID$(H$,B+1,1) ; :RETU 
RN 

RR 360 A=INT(AD/Z6) ;GOSOB350:A 

=AD-A* 26 ;GOSUB350: PRINT 
■1 . n . 

BE 370 CK=INT (AD/Z6} :CK=AD-Z4* 
CK+Z5* (CK>Z7) :GOTO390 



BD 


230 


JS 


240 


JH 


250 


HK 


2( 


-)0 


FD 


2- 





EJ 


2E 





EM 


2E 





JX 


300 


KF 


31 






JULY 1992 COMPUTE G-39 



PROGRAMS 



IF F 



DATA 
: IF IN 



PX 380 CK=CK*Z2+Z5*(CK>Z7)+A 
JC 390 CK=CK+35* (CK>Z5) :RETURN 
QS 400 PRINT"{DOWN}STARTING AT 

'f4>"; :GOSUB300:IF IN5<> 

NS THEN GOSDBL030 

{SPACE3THEN400 
EX 410 RETURN 
HD 420 PRINT" CRVS) ENTER 

{SPACE)" :GOSUB400 

S=NS THEN22fl 
JK 430 OPEN3,3:PRINT 
SK 440 POKE198,0:GOSUH360:IF F 
THEN PRINT IN5: PRINT" 

{UPl{5 RIGHT}"; 
GC 450 FOR 1=0 TO 24 STEP 3:B$ 

=S$:FOR J=l TO 2:IF P T 

HEN BS=MID$(IN$,I+J,1) 
HA 460 PRINT"{RVS}"B5L$;:IF I< 

24THEN PRINT" (OFF}"; 
HD 470 GET A5:IF A$=NS THEN470 
PK 480 IF(A$>"/"ANDAS<":")OR(a 

$>"@"ANDA$<"G")THEN54 
GS 495 A=-{AS="M")-2*(A$=",")- 

3*(.AS = ".")-4*{A$="/")-5 

*(A5="J")-6* (A$="K") 
FX 486 A=A-7*(AS="L")-8*(A$=": 

")-9*(AS="U")-i0*(A5="I 

")~11*(AS="0")-12*(A5=" 
. pt.) 

CM 487 A=A-13*(A$=SS) :IF A THE 
N AS"=MI0S("ABCD123E456F 
0",A,1) :GOTO 540 
MP 490 IF AS=ftS AND ( (1=0) AND{J 
=1)0R F)THEN PRINT BS;: 
J=2:NEXT:I=24:GOTO550 
KC 500 IF AS="{H0ME)" THEN PRI 
NT BS: J=2:NEXT:I=24:NEX 
T:F=0:GOTO440 
MX 510 IF<A$="{RIGHT}")ANDF TH 

ENPRINT BSL$; :GOTO540 
GK 520 IF A$<>LS AND A$<>D5 OR 
{(I=0)AND(J=1) )THEN GOS 
OB1060:GOTO470 
HG 530 AS=L$+S$+L$:PRINT B$LS; 
;J=2-J:IF J THEN PRINT 
{SPACE}L$; :I=I-3 
QS 540 PRINT A$;:NEXT J:PRINT 

{SPACE}S$; 
PM 550 NEXT I ; PRINT : PRINT" (OP) 
tS RIGHT}"; :INPUT#3, INS 
;IF IN$=N$ THEN CL0SE3: 
GOTO220 
QC 560 FOR 1=1 TO 25 STEP3:B$= 
M IDS (INS, I) :GOSOB320:IF 
I<25 THEN GOSUB3a0:A{I 
/3)=A 
PK 570 NEXT: IF AOCK THEN GOSU 
B1060:PRINT"!BLK} (HVS3 
{SPACE}ERROR: REENTER L 
INE <4}":F = 1,:GOTO440 
HJ 588 GOSUB1080:B=BE+AD-EA:FO 
R 1=0 TO 7:P0KE B+I,A(I 
) :NEXT 
QQ 590 AD=AD+8:3F AD>EA THEN C 
L0SE3;PRINT" (DOWN} (BLU} 
** END OF ENTRY **fBLKj 
(2 DOHN}":GOTO700 
GQ 600 F=0:GOTO440 



QA 610 PRINT"{CLR}{DOWN}{RVS) 

[SPACEJDISPLAY DATA ":G 

OSUB400:IF IN$=NS THEN2 

20 

RJ 620 PRINT"CdOWN}{BL[]}PRESS: 

{RVS}SPACE{OFF} TO PAU 

SE, {rvs}return{off} to 

BREAK<4}{D0WN)" 
KS 630 G0SUB36C!:B=BS+AD-SA:F0R 
I=BTO B+7:A=PEEK(I) :G0R 
UB350:GOSOB380tPRINT SS 

CC 640 NEXT:PRINT"(RVS}"; :A=CK 

:GOSUB350:PRINT 
KH 650 F=1:AD=AD+8:IF AD>EA TH 

ENPRINT"{DOWN) (BLU}** E 

ND OF DATA **":GOTO220 
KC 660 GET AS: IF A$=RS THEN GO 

SUB1080:GOTO220 
EQ 670 IF AS=SS THEN F=F+1:G0S 

UB1080 
AD 680 ONFGOTO630,660,630 
CM 690 PRINT"(DOWN} {RVS} LOAD 

(SPACBJdATA ":0P=1:G0T0 

710 
PC 700 PRINT"{DOWN) (RVS) SAVE 

{SPACEJfILE ":OP=0 
RX 710 INS=NS:INPUT"{DOWN}FILE 

NAME{4r';INStIF INS=NS 

{SPACE}THEN220 
PR 720 F=0:PRINT"{DOWN)(BLK} 

{RVS}T{OFF}APE OR (RVS) 

D{0FF)ISK: i4j"; 
FP 730 GET AS: IF AS="T"THEN PR 

INT"T{DOHN}":GOTO8fl0 
HQ 740 IF A$<>"D"THEH730 
HH 750 PRINT"D{DOWN}":0PEN15,B 

,15,"I0:":B=EA-SA:IN5=" 

0i"+IN$:IF OP THEN810 
SQ 760 OPEN 1,8,8,IN$+",P,W":G 

OSUB860:IF A THEN220 
FJ 770 AH=INT(SA/256) :AL=SA-{A 

H*256) : PRINT* 1,CHRS(AL) 

;CHRS(AH) ; 
PE 780 FOR 1=0 TO B;PRINT#1,CH 

RS (PEEK(BS+I) ) ; : IF ST T 

HEN800 
FC 790 NEXT:CL0SE1:CL©SE15:G0T 

0940 
GS 800 GOSUB1060:PRINT"{DOWN) 

{BLK}ERROR DURING SAVE: 

{4}":GOSUB860:GOTO220 
HA 610 OPEN 1,8,8, INS+",P,R":G 

OSUB860:IF A THEN220 
GE 820 GET#1,A$,BS:AD=ASC(A$+Z 

S)+256*ASC(BS+2S) :IF AD 

OSA THEN F=1:GOTO850 
RX 830 FOR 1=0 TO B:GET#1,A$:P 

OKE BS+I ,ASC(AS+ZS) :IF( 

I<>B)AND ST THEN F=2:AD 

=I:1=B 
FA 840 NEXT:IF ST064 THEN F = 3 
FQ 850 CL0SEl:CL0SE15:0N ABS (F 

>0)+l GOTO960,970 
SA 860 INPUT#15,A,AS:IF A THEN 
CLOSE 1: CLOSE 15 :GOSUB10 

60:PRINT"{RVS}ERROR: "A 

$ 



GQ 870 RETURN 

EJ 880 P0KE183,PEEK(FA+2) tPOKE 
18 7,PEEK(FA+3) : POKE 18 8, 
PEEK(FA+4) :IFOP=0THEN92 

HJ 890 SYS 63466:IF(PEEK(783) A 
NDDTHEN GOSUB1060:PRIN 
T" {DOWN} {RVS} FILE NOT 
CSPACE3P0UND ":GOTO690 
CS 900 AD=PEEK(829)+256*PEEK(8 
30): IF ADOSA THEN F=l: 
GOTO 97 
SC 910 A=PEEK(831) +256*PEEK(83 
2)-l:F=F-2* (A<EA) -3* (A> 
EA) :AD=A-AD:GOTO930 
KH 920 A=SA:B=EA+1:GOSUB1010:P 

OKE780,3:SYS 63338 
JF 930 A=BS;B=BS+(EA-SA)+1:G0S 
UB1010:ON OP GOTO9S0;SY 
S 63591 
AE 940 GOSUBl080:PRINT"fBLU)** 
SAVE COMPLETED **":GOT 
0220 
XP 950 POKE147,0:SYS 63562:IF 

tSPACE}ST>0 THEN970 
FR 960 GOSUB1080:PRINT"{BLU}** 
LOAD COMPLETED **":GOT 
0220 
DP 970 GOSUB1060:PRINT"{BLK) 

(RVS3ERR0R DURING LOAD: 
CDOWN5{4J":ON F GOSUB98 
0,990,1000:GOTO220 
PP 980 PRINT"INCORRECT STARTIN 
G ADDRESS ( " ; : GOSUB360 : 
PRINT") ": RETURN 
GR 990 PRINT"LOAD ENDED AT ";: 
AD=SA+AD:GOSUB360: PRINT 
DS: RETURN 
FD 1000 PRINT"TRUNCATED AT END 

ING ADDRESS":RETURN 
RX 1010 AH=INT {A/256) :AL=A- (AH 
*256) :P0KE193,AL:P0KE1 
9 4, AH 
FF 1020 AH=INT (B/256) :AL=B-(AH 
*256) ;P0KE17 4,AL:P0KE1 
75,AH:RETURN 
FX 1030 IF AD<SA OR AD>EA THEN 

1050 
CR 1040 IF (AD>511 AND AD<6528 
0) THEN GOSUB1080: F=0 
: RETURN 
HC 1050 GOSUB1060:PRINT"{RVS) 
{SPACE} INVALID ADDRESS 
{DOWN} {BLK}":F=1:RETU 
RN 
AR 1060 POKE SD+5,31:POKE SD+6 
,208:POKE SD,240:POKE 
{SPACE}SD+1,4:P0KE SD+ 
4,33 
DX 1070 FOR S=l TO 100:NEXTtGO 

TO1090 
PF 1080 POKE SD+5,8:P0KE SD+6, 
240:POKE SD,0:POKE SD+ 
1,90:POKE SD+4,17 
AC 1090 FOR S=l TO 100:NEXT:PO 
KE SD+4,0:POKE SD,0:PO 
KE SD+1,0:RETURN 



G-40 COMPUTE JULY 1992 



^.^^^^:^?v^^ 



1J 



f 




^ 



1^ 



Coming August 1, 
rrom trie creators or 

Eye Of The Beholder I and II, 

and in trie tradition or 

King's Quest/ 

experience a ^wnole ne\v realm or 

rantasy adventure . . . >m|^^ 




A 



r*^ 




\ 



,5C«S3^ 



Westwood 



1^ 






BOOK ONE \r^ 



m 











mmerse yourself in 

The Legend 
\f^ ^ Of Kyrandia™, 

tne first fantasy 
aaventure in tne 

Fables <& Fiends™ series. 

Enter A 
Und Where 
Magic Is Real. 




A land of dark mysterious forests and 

sleeping dragons. A land or glittering 

ruoies and emeralds. A land of breatn- 

taking teauty and secrets to unravel. 

Tne land of Kyrandia. 





Gorgeous scenes and realistic animation draw 
you into tnis tantasy adventure. Elegant point- 
and-clicR control makes it easy to play. Tne rally 
orcnestrated soundtrack will captivate you. 




M 

DislrituteQ exclusively by B>i,'.lB Irvine, CA 

For pricing ana orders, please call 800-VRG-IN07. Visa, Mastercaro, American 
Express and checks accepted. Get Kelp witli our hintline! Call 1 -900-288-4744. 
(Calls are cnargeo at 75 cents per minute. You must be 18.) 

The Legend Of Kyrandia Awaits You! 

Eye oi The BehoUeT I 4na TI, AavdncM Dungiionf And DrA^otu *n itmiemaAn of TSK, Inc. Kin^'i Queft* h « ngu^ni tr«li«m4rli oi Sierra On-Un«, Inc. 

Fables and FIBVDS and The LECEND Of KVEA-NDIA ait trjJemarL of WcitwmJ Sludios, Inc- ©1992 l)Cii.!wooil SluJioi. Inc. All rigiila leaentd. 

Circle Reader Servloe Number 158 




REVIEWS 



TANDY 4825 SX 
TANDY 4850 EP 

What if I told you that you 
could get the performance 
of a 486 computer, service 
from a local computer retail- 
er, and state-of-the-art video 
and hard disk perform- 
ance—all for about $2,000? 
If you're in the market to up- 
grade your computer to a 
high-end business system for 
graphics processing, you'd 
probably ask for a telephone 
number. And what if I told 
you that the system I just de- 
scribed is a Tandy? You'd 
probably say, "The folks who 
brought us the RL 1000?" 

That's right. The compa- 
ny that wants to put a com- 
puter in every kitchen also 
wants to put a 486 screamer 
on your desktop. And with 
the price and performance of 
its new 486-based series, Tan- 
dy just might do it. 

Starting with the 4825 SX, 
computer users in small busi- 
nesses who need leading- 
edge performance from 
their computers are finally 
within reach of that kind of 
power. An Intel 486SX proc- 
essor supplies true 32-bit 
performance. If you've 
been working with a 386SX- 
based computer, the differ- 
ence in performance is abso- 
lutely radical, especially 
with Windows applications. 

The 4825 SX compares fa- 
vorably to a 33-MHz 386 sys- 
tem, and it has one special 
feature: It's completely up- 
gradable to a 50-MHz 486 
system. Now you're talking 
power. But what does this 
performance mean in real 
terms? For most home offic- 
es, 486 power is overkill. 
But the biannual question 
posed by Intel continues: 
With prices this good, what 
are you waiting for? 

In my own home office, I 
use an Insight 386SX run- 

100 COMPUTE JULY 1992 



ning at 16 f^Hz, with 4MB of 
RAM and 1 MB of video mem- 
ory. Not state-of-the-art, but 
so far it's been good to me. 
In my evaluation of these 
two new Tandy systems, I 
did some testing and came 
up with some numbers that 
made my pride and joy look 
like a mere rookie at Darling- 



ance, but the Tandy ma- 
chines still ran circles 
around my home computer. 
For graphical computing, 
you can expect perform- 
ance improvements from 
100 percent (4825 SX} to 
180 percent (4850 EP) over 
a I6-MH2 386SX system. 
This just goes to show that 




\Ni\h Tandy's new 4825 SX and 4850 EP. you can get the power of 
a 486 system at less than the usual 486 price. 



ton Motor Speedway. 

With character-based ap- 
plications such as spread- 
sheets, word processors, 
and databases, the results 
are predictable. Compared 
to my 386SX, the 4825 SX 
and the 4850 EP crunched 
numbers about 312 percent 
and 335 percent faster, re- 
spectively In word process- 
ing, the improvements rang 
up 297 percent and 316 per- 
cent. And when it came to 
database performance, the 
4825 SX outperformed my 
home machine by 298 per- 
cent, while its bigger cousin 
boasted an improvement of 
300 percent- The Overall Nor- 
ton Performance Index 
placed the 4825 SX at 64.3 
and the 4850 EP at 93,3. By 
comparison, my 386SX rates 
a 7,2. Whoa! Eat my silicon! 

The numbers weren't 
quite as impressive when it 
came to Windows perform- 



real improvements to graphi- 
cal computing can be had 
by adding a video accelera- 
tor card to your existing sys- 
tem — that's much iess expen- 
sive than scrapping an en- 
tire system for a faster CPU. 
From the lightweight plas- 
tic outside casing to the com- 
pact interior engineering, 
the Tandy 4825 SX and the 
4850 EP showcase capable 
design. The 4MB of RAM 
{standard on each, with po- 
tential upgrades to 32MB), 
512K of video memory (stan- 
dard on each, with a poten- 
tial upgrade to 1MB for 
1024 X 768 resolution in 
256 colors), and disk drive 
controllers are located on 
the main board. Four empty 
SIMM sockets can be used 
to increase the system mem- 
ory to 5MB, 8MB, 20MB, or 
32MB, depending on the 
type of SIMM used in the up- 
grade (256K, 1MB, or 4MB 



chips rated at 80 ns). 

Video memory is also eas- 
ily enhanced by adding four 
video memory chips that 
mount directly into sockets 
on the main board. As it 
ships, the video controlier is 
capable of 640 x 480 reso- 
lution in 256 colors. If you're 
planning to turn one of 
these systems into a dedicat- 
ed graphics workstation, 
you may want to upgrade to 
Super VGA (SVGA). Tandy 
doesn't sell the video mem- 
ory chips, although a Radio 
Shack dealer can order 
them for you from another 
vendor. 

This much power de- 
mands equal amounts of stor- 
age space, and Tandy deliv- 
ers with a 120MB IDE hard 
disk governed by an internal 
controller that can support a 
maximum of two drives. A sin- 
gle 1.44MB floppy drive al- 
so comes standard with ei- 
ther unit. There's room for 
another 5'/4-inch drive de- 
vice, which can be a floppy 
drive, a second hard disk, 
or a CD-ROM drive. 

Outside, both systems 
use a high-profile 101 -key 
keyboard that provides am- 
ple tactile feedback and com- 
fort. Both systems also ship 
with a Tandy two-button 
mouse that plugs into a PS/ 
2-style connector in the 
back of the system unit. The 
mouse is the most disap- 
pointing element in the en- 
tire system — if I spend more 
than $2,000 on a computer 
(monitor not included), I 
want something more than a 
$10 mouse. Many clone man- 
ufacturers offer a Logitech or 
Microsoft mouse with their sys- 
tems; Tandy should, too. 

I reviewed these systems 
with a Tandy VGM-440 VGA 
monitor, which is capable of 
1024 X 768 resolution in 
256 colors (SVGA), provid- 
ed you upgrade the video 
memory to 1MB. Other less 



SPANISH 

30 Cassettes 
+ Triple Bonus 
$265.00 



FRENCH 

30 Casseties 
♦ Triple Bonus 
S265.00 



GERMAN 

30 CassEltes 
+ Triple Bonus 
$265.00 



ITALIAN 

30 Casseties 
t Triple Bonus 
S265.00 



JAPANESE 

30 Cassettes 
+ Triple Bonus 
$285.00 



L \d i| ^f^^~^ m ^ j 



Mandarin 


RUSSIAN 


Brazilian 


CHINESE 


30 Casselles 


PORTUGUESE 


30 Cassettes 


+ Triple Bonus 


30 Cassettes 


^ Triple Bonus 


S285.00 


* Triple Bonos 


S285.00 




S265.00 





Learn Foreign Languages... Incredibly Fast! 



Conversing in a Toreign language is a major social and business asset...and brings new life to the worlds of travel, entertainment, 
and relationships. The technique of accelerated learning, as conveyed by these proven foreign language courses, allows anyone 
to comfortably converse in a new language within 30 days. 



Accelerated learning, developed by famed 
learning expert Dr. Georgi Lozanov, is based 
on the premise of involving both hemispheres of 
the brain in the education process. The analyti- 
cal or logical left side of ihe brain, when prop- 
erly activated with the musical or artistic right 











side of the brain, both iiscreases the speed and 
heightens the retention of learning. Utilizing 
these untapped mental capacities of your learn- 
ing ability is the basis of this unique, highly 
effective course. 

You wilt learn the langtjage as stresslessiy as 
a child does, by hearing new vocabulary and 
phrases in alternately loud, whispered, and em- 
phatic intonations, all accompanied by slow 
rhythmic music in digital stereo. This perfect 
combination of music and words allow the two 
halves of the brain to work together lo dramati- 
cally facilitate your assimilation of the new 
language. 

The first 15 (memory) tapes of this 30-tape 
package help activate the learning capacities of 
the brain. The second 15 (study) tapes are the 
very same tried and proven tapes used by the 
Foreign Service Institute to train career diplo- 
mats. This marriage of two concepts literally 
gives you two courses in one, providing the best 
of both worlds in language instruction. 

Best Value! With a total of 32 casseties plus 
study materials, this program represents the best 



value available today in language instruction. 
Compared to other programs, the Accelerated 
Learning Series outperforms them with twice 
the audio and 20 times the study material. 

To correctly converse in a foreign language. 
you must understand the meanings and intent of 
thenative speaker. If, after 30 days of listening 
to the study and memory tapes, you are not 
comjhrfably widerstamting and conversing in 
your new lani^i(ai;e. retwii ihemfor a full refund. 



TO ORDER; Phone or send your ctieck, moriEy oriter or Inst. P.O. 



TOLL-FREE 24 HRS; VISA • M/C 



1*800*85* AUDIO 



Rush Orders PHONE 9-5 PDTr 

1»818«799»9000 



"American Managers with Language 
Skills Open More Doors" 




Vou may PAX your credit curd orcJer cr company P.O. to: 

1*818*792*7815 



INTERNATIONAL ORDERING INFORMATION • 



"IVewl Ndw. r<ir your ortlcring a)nvenit'ncc, you 
may tul! 'Hir order desk toll-trcf 2^ hours a day 
from ;iny of the follow ing cnunlriCJ^ \ iii AT&T 
International 800 Senice." 



BELBIUM 11-6599 

DENMARK 8001-0578 

FRANCE 05-M-1368 

GERMANY 0130-81-1139 

ITAir 1678-70-179 

JAPAN 0031-11-1907 



NETHERLAMD 06-022-4612 

SINGAPDHE 800-1625 

SPAIN SOO-Sa-1120 

SWEDEN 020-793-626 

SWITZ 046-05-9632 

UK 0800-89-7452 



a FRENCH S265.00 

D SPANISH S265.00 

D GERMAN $255.00 

n rrALIANS265.00 

D PORTUGUESE (Brazilian) $265.00 

n JAPANESE $285.00 

D RUSSIAN $285.00 

D CHINESE (Mandarin) $285.00 



_State_ 



_Zip_ 



Credit Card No Exp 
























J 



























Study Tjipcs 



Clfcle R»cl«r Service 
Number 193 



Signature (Card Orders Only) 
•Z VISA J MASTERCARD 
Need It Tomorrow? Ask Operalor for Express Service 



Or Write To; 

PROFESSIONAL CASSETTTE CENTER 

408 SOtrrH PASADENA AVE., SUITE 4 
DEFARTMEt^T CPF 
PASADENA, CALIFORNIA 91105 U.S.A. 
Please aidd $11.00 shipping & handling 
California residents add 8'A% sales tax 
I All Funds Payable In U.S. Dollars ■ 



REVIEWS 



expensive Tandy VGA moni- 
tors are available, but they 
don't support the Super 
VGA mode. Alternatively, 
you could use a non-Tandy 
VGA monitor. 

According to Intel, the cus- 
tomer can perform the proc- 
essor upgrade from the 
4825 SX to the 4850 EP, 
which is fine for large busi- 
nesses with a dedicated 
MIS staff. But for small busi- 
nesses and home offices, 
Tandy recommends taking 
the system into a Radio 
Shack store and having a 
dealer perform the upgrade, 
which involves removing the 
486SX chip and replacing it 
with a 50-MHz chip — no oth- 
er modifications are required. 

Overall, these are very ca- 
pable systems at competi- 
tive retail prices. You can 
probably do better with mail- 
order shopping, perhaps sav- 
ing enough to buy a monitor 
or finding a 25-MHz 486SX 
system that includes a mon- 
itor for around $2,000. Even 
so, risking capital on mys- 
tery components isn't al- 
ways the best solution for 
home office entrepreneurs 
and small businesses. 
When compared to those of 
mainline direct sellers like 
Dell and ZEOS, the Tandy 
systems aren't that much 
more expensive. And with 
the upgrade path to full 50- 
MHz performance, these ma- 
chines aren't likely to be ob- 
solete for years to come. 

But isn't that what they 
said about the 386? 

PETER SCISCO 



Tandy 4825 SX— $1 .699 (with floppy 
drive). $1,999 (with 120MB hard 
disk), $2,799 (with MPC upgrade) 
Tandy 4850 EP— S2,398 Tandy VGM- 
440 monitor (Super VGA capable)— 
$599 

TANDY 

1800 One Tandy Center 
Fort Worth, TX 76102 
(817) 390-3001 

Circle Reader Service Number 361 

102 COMPUTE JULY 1992 




Throw away your floppies and quit worrying about a hard drive 
crash: The Jumbo Tape Backup System is here! 



JUMBO TAPE 
BACKUP SYSTEM 

When it comes to backing 
up information on floppies, 
my philosophy isn't exactly 
mainstream. I've found my- 
self in a defensive- position 
when discussing the sub- 
ject. You see, I hate back- 
ing up my hard drives be- 
cause I already have hun- 
dreds of floppies in storage. 
Adding 50 more would 
compound my organization- 
ai difficulties, I only back up 
the few directories in which 
my current work is found. 

This system works, even 
when I trash one of my work 
files — until the dreaded 
hard drive crash, that is. 
(And recently I've had more 
than my share, since I just 
wrote a disk utility that in- 
cludes an optimizer.) At 
these catastrophic junc- 
tures, I realize everyone 
else was right: I should've 
backed up the entire drive. 
Rectifying things takes me 
hours — and reminds me 
how much I hate application- 
installation programs. Until re- 
cently, I continued my insane 
approach to data backups. 

Enter the hero, Colorado 
Memory Systems' JUMBO 
Tape Backup System 120. 
Since it's been installed, I ha- 
ven't had a single disaster 



that took more than 15 min- 
utes to fix. And I haven't 
lost any data — just the small 
amount of time it took to re- 
store things from tape. 

How easy is it? Extremely. 
Once it's installed, the soft- 
ware is on your hard drive. 
For extra safety I copied the 
software to floppy in case the 
absolute worst happened, it 
never has, but it would've 
been easy enough to run the 
restore software from floppy. 

To start the software, you 
just type TAPE. Just about 
everything you do is with 
function key-controlled men- 
us. They're plain and simple 
in appearance but perfectly 
functional. When you're re- 
storing your life's work, you 
don't really care what the 
menus look like. 

The backup options cov- 
er all bases. You can back 
up an entire drive, an entire 
directory selected directo- 
ries, and selected files in di- 
rectories. What's great is the 
unattended backup feature. 
If you enable this, your 
computer will automatically 
back itself up at the designat- 
ed time. It's smart enough to 
know when the computer is 
in use and beeps at you if 
it's time to do the backup 
and you're in the way 1 set 
mine for Saturday morning 
at 4:00, and it provided safe- 
ty while I slept. 



Restoring is just as easy 
as backing up. You can se- 
lect which files and directo- 
ries you want or restore the 
entire drive. The JUMBO sys- 
tem isn't lightning fast, 
though. An entire 65MB 
hard drive takes about 25 
minutes to back up and 
about the same amount of 
time to restore. 

Although complete instruc- 
tions for installation are in- 
cluded, I wouldn't recom- 
mend doing it yourself un- 
less you're totally at home 
inside your PC. I installed 
the JUMBO system in two dif- 
ferent computers and expe- 
rienced the same difficulties 
both times. The mounting 
hardware wasn't what my 
two systems expected. That 
meant I had to scrounge 
around among spare pieces 
to find what I needed. And 
the instructions for connect- 
ing the cables, while com- 
plete, didn't go the extra 
mile for beginners, I had no 
trouble installing the hard- 
ware, but it's easy to see 
that some people would. 
Don't let that discourage 
you from buying the device; 
just plan on getting a profes- 
sional to install it. 

If you hate backing up 
your hard drive, get one of 
these babies. It'll save you 
time, trouble, floppy disks, 
and hassles when your co- 
workers debate the merits of 
backing up your entire 
drive. I've seen the system ad- 
vertised in the $200 range. 
Not bad, considering what 
it'll save you in the long run. 

RICK LEINECKER 



JUMBO Tape Backup System 120— 

$250 

JUMBO Tape Backup System 250— 

$350 

COLORADO MEMORY SYSTEMS 
800 S. Taft Ave. 
Loveland, CO 80537 
(800) 845-7905 

Circle Reader Service Number 362 



BUST THE MOST 
DIFFICULT NINTENDO PUZZLES 

WITH THESE BOOKS FROM 

CDIUIPUTE 



COMPUTE'S 

NINTENDO TIPS 

& TRICKS 

Here are hundreds of tips 

and tricks for tfie 

most popular Nintendo games. 

Tfiis book focuses 

on super tips to fielp even 

tfie most experienced 
Nintendo player solve the 

most perplexing 

puzzles and defeat clever 

enemies. 



rcOMPUTE's 

NINTEND 

TIP$&TRICK$ 




-•>'?" 



f^'^ 



J. DDUCLA» ArtMOLlt 



CONQUERING 

SUPER 
MARIO BROS. 

This book focuses 
on playing tips and techniques 

for mastering the 
three most popular Nintendo 

games. Fully 

illustrated with screen shots. 

includes extensive 

playing tips and valuable 

information on 

how to find many of the 

hidden power- 

ups and warp zones. 



StfH 




tsnliv 



COMPUTE-s Guide to 

Nintendo 

Adventure 

Games 



i(->.^ 



THE ornciAL 

GUIDE 
TO MEGA MAN 

This is the complete 
playing guide to all four of the 

best-selling Mega Man 
games, including Mega Man 

Game Boy 
Features include extensive 

playing tips, 
screen shots, and puzzle- 
busting hints 
Schwartz is known for. 



COMFUTrS 

GUIDE TO NINTENDO 

ADVENTURE 

GAMES 

Includes tips and 

strategies for half a 

dozen of the 

most popular Nintendo 

Ajventure games. 
Covers The Bsrd's Tale. 

Crystals, Final 
Fantasy, The Immortal, 

Shadowgate, 

Swords and Serpents, 

and Ultima. 



tSM Bw onuwaw yew (*«h1 
TheBoicrttoi* • final ronkBy « Pw Imr. 



r^ 



VFC I P I want more 
■I ^^^M» hints and tips. 
Please send me ttie books cliecked below. 

D The Official Guide to Mega Man 

S7.95 (2419) 
D COMPUTE'S Guide to Nintendo Adventure Gam«» 

S7.95 (2435) 
D Conquering Super Marls Bros. 

J7.95 12427) 
D COMPUTE'S Nintendo Tips i Tricks 

$9.9; (24eX) 

Total Numlier ol iaa\a 

Total Coat of Books Onfaitd 

Subtotal 

Sales Tax (Residenls ol NC. NY, and HI add 

appropriate £aJe& lax lor your area. Canadian 
orders add 7% goods and seivices tax.) 

Shippi-ig and Handling: $2 per liooii U.S.: 

$4 Canada: S6 loreign. 

Total EiKlssed 



7\ 



I I ChecK or Money Order [ 1 MC | 1 VISA 
Signature 





(flequtred] 


Arrt Nd: 


Fip Rale 




Please Print 


W;im(* 




Pirppt AfWrsw 


rily 


.■^latn Tip 



M pider3 mtjs; be [^ in LI.S. ttuds ckawi on a U 5. t)anh- 

Mall to: Compute Books 
c/D CCC 

2500 McClellan Ave. 
Pennsaulten, NJ 08109 

Offer good wfiile supplies fasi, 

NlnterxJo^ and Super Mario Bros.® are registered 

IraDerrsarks ol Nintendo ArT>erk:a, incorporated. 

7M92C 



REVIEWS 



MAGNAVOX 

HEADSTART 

386SX-20CD 

The decision about which 
computer to purctiase often 
boils down to wliat's includ- 
ed in ttie package. And this 
package — the Magnavox 
Headstart 386SX-20CD with 
a 3V2-inch floppy drive, a 
CD-ROM player, and a Micro- 
soft-compatible mouse — 
has some pretty neat stuff. 
It's bundled with the easy-to- 
use graphical interface 
GeoWorks Ensemble, Lotus 
1-2-3 Version 2.2, and plen- 
ty of CD-ROM software for 
the whole family. 

You can use the system al- 
most straight out of the box. 
Since the setup guide is a 
mere seven diagramed pag- 
es, you can pretty much un- 
wrap the computer, put it on 
your desk, and plug it in, 
The slimline case is well 
laid out and should fit easily 
even on small tables. 

The Magnavox has anall- 
in-one motherboard, which 
means that all of your periph- 
eral ports are built into the 
motherboard. The downside 
to this is that if one of the 
ports goes bad, you'll have 
to replace the whole mother- 
board. Also, since a CD- 
ROM drive is included with 
this system, you have only 
three expansion slots in the 
back. However, this kind of 
system tends to cost less 
than one with the traditional 
add-on type of mother- 
board—a plus if you're on a 
strict budget. 

The Maxtor 80MB IDE 
hard drive should give most 
home users all the storage 
space they'll need for quite 
a while. Two megabytes of 
RAM are standard. One pos- 
sible drawback, however, is 
how the Magnavox handles 
memory expansion. While 

104 COMPUTE JULY 1992 



the computer can take up 
to 16MB of RAM, you can 
install only an additional 
8MB on board by adding 
SIMMs. You'll have to buy 
an expansion card for addi- 
tional memory above that, 
which means using up an- 
other slot. If memory expan- 
sion is a priority on your list 
when you're computer shop- 
ping, you probably should 
consider a more expanda- 
ble machine. 

The monitor you get with 
this system is a Super VGA 
with BOO X 600 resolution 
and 16 colors. Again, be- 
cause the video-adapter 
card is built in, you're limited 
in your ability to upgrade. If 
you disable the on-board vid- 
eo controller, you'll have to 
use yet another expansion 
slot in the back of the 
computer. 

Despite its expansion lim- 
itations, this Magnavox be- 
comes a very friendly ma- 
chine when bundled with 
GeoWorks Ensemble. Ensem- 
ble — similar to Windows 3.0 
in that it's an icon-oriented, 
point-and-click interface — 
provides you with an easy 
means of accessing your oth- 
er applications, along with 
some convenient desktop 
tools and a couple of 
games. One nice aspect of 
Ensemble is that a simple 
Ctrl-Esc allows you to listen 
to your audio CDs on the 
CD-ROM player (with the in- 
cluded headphones) while 
working in another applica- 
tion. When not listening to 
music, you'll want to take ad- 
vantage of the software in- 
cluded for the CD-ROM 
player. 

Supporting a variety of 
the most popular word proc- 
essors, Microsoft Bookshelf 
offers up a nice collection of 
writing resources: The Amer- 
ican Heritage Dictionary, 
Bartlett's Familiar Quota- 
tions. The Chicago Manual 



of Style, and more. The pro- 
gram loads in as memory res- 
ident, so it's easily ac- 
cessed from your favorite 
word processor. Unfortunate- 
ly, GeoWrite, the word proc- 
essor included with Ensem- 
ble, doesn't support this 
part of Bookshelf; in order to 
use the memory-resident fea- 
ture, you'll have to use anoth- 
er word processor. 

The New Grolier Electron- 
ic Encyclopedia contains all 
21 volumes of the current Ac- 
ademic American Encyclope- 
dia. This easy-to-use pro- 
gram makes looking up top- 
ics a snap, and the graph- 
ics are superb. An IBM-com- 
patible version is also includ- 
ed on the CD-setup disk. 

For learning world geogra- 
phy, PC Globe PAK is a 
gold mine. The extensive da- 
tabases of PC Globe and 
PC USA are definitely this 
software's shining stars, 
with information on more 
than 190 countries ranging 
from population statistics to 
tourist attractions. You can 
even listen to 177 national an- 
thems from around the 
world. GeoJigsaw, also in- 
cluded, is an onscreen geog- 
raphy puzzle. 

For children. The Man- 
hole is an easy-to-use audi- 
ovisual fantasy exploration 
program. Point the mouse 
and click, and you're head- 
ed in a new direction. Every 
cubbyhole you prod hides a 
surprise. 

Microsoft Small Business 
Consultant and Stat Pak of- 
fer a world of information at 
your fingertips. They sup- 
port most popular word proc- 
essors, but, once again, 
GeoWrite isn't supported. 
You'll find an array of useful 
information — from books to 
government publications — 
for any type of business 
professional. 

For most home computer 
buyers, the Magnavox Head- 



start 386SX-20CD with a CD- 
ROM drive is a turnkey sys- 
tem with enough software to 
keep you happy for a long 
time. New computer buyers 
should find this package 
worth a close look. 

JILL CHAMPION 



Magnavox Headstart 3e6SX-20CD 
witti 2MB RAM, 80MB tiard drive, 
3y;-incli floppy drive, CD-ROM 
drive, mouse, software, and Super 
VGA monilor— $2,099 

PHILIPS CONSUMER ELECTRON- 
ICS 

One Philips Dr. 
Knoxville. TN 37914 
(213)217-1300 
Circle Reader Service Number 3S3 



OUECTVISION 2.0 

There are database pro- 
grams. There are develop- 
ment systems. There are 
forms designers. And lately, 
hybrid products that claim 
to be all three have come 
along. ObjectVision 2.0 for 
Windows is one program 
that makes such a claim. 

It is, in tact, a very power- 
ful database toolkit that 
makes formerly difficult Win- 
dows jobs childishly simple. 

Borland coyly refuses to of- 
fer a one-line description of 
ObjectVision, so I'll follow 
Borland's lead and instead 
summarize what you can do 
with the program. Ob- 
jectVision can be used to cre- 
ate databases in dBASE, Par- 
adox, ASCII, and BTrieve 
formats. You can create fil- 
ters for these databases us- 
ing a simple forms ap- 
proach. You can design 
forms for these databases 
visually, with full control over 
fonts and color support as 
well. The design tools mimic 
those of a rudimentary-but- 
capable draw program (but 
OtjjectVision can import 
bitmaps via the Windows 
Clipboard). Most onscreen 
objects, such as fields, data- 
base tables, and buttons. 



can perform user-defined ac- 
tions using visual "event 
trees" that do many of the 
same things a simple pro- 
gramming language could 
do, without forcing you to 
program. 

Borland originally down- 
played the ability of Ob- 
jectVision 1.0 to create data- 
bases, instead touting it as 
a front end for other da- 
tabase systems, notably 
dBASE and Paradox. But as 
often happens with soft- 
ware, those pesky users in- 
sisted on doing their own 
thing with it — and that 
turned out to be custom ap- 
plication development. Us- 
ers were also unwilling to 
part with $495 {the original 
price for ObjectVision 1.0) 
for a database program that 
didn't have a traditional pro- 
gramming environment. 

Borland sensibly paid at- 
tention to their needs, soon 
tilting the development of 
2.0 toward the creation of so- 
phisticated data-manage- 
ment systems under Win- 
dows, the company went 
one step further and al- 
lowed the free distribution of 
ObjectVision runtime mod- 
ules. The result is that peo- 
ple who were formerly not 
identified as database ex- 
perts (the same people who 
are willing to take a crack 
at macros in 1-2-3 or 
WordPerfect but who don't 
identify themselves as pro- 
grammers) are suddenly 
able to quickly create seam- 
less, freely distributable da- 
tabase applications that run 
under Windows. 

And while ObjectVision 
2.0 does lack the scripting 
language it so richly de- 
serves, it's able to perform 
many of the kinds of tasks 
that would be enormously 
complicated using languag- 
es such as SQL or dBASE. 
One of ObjectVision's un- 
sung features is the ability 



of a single onscreen form to 
update many different data- 
bases using many different 
formats at once, For exam- 
ple, your innocent-looking or- 
der entry form can automati- 
cally update your dBASE cus- 
tomer file, a Paradox inven- 
tory table, and an ASCII mail- 
ing list file, all without requir- 



is ObjectVision for you? 
See if any of the following ap- 
ply: Do you need to develop 
Windows database applica- 
tions of elementary-to-medi- 
um complexity? Are you fair- 
ly sure that you can get by 
without a programming lan- 
guage to back you up (or 
do you not know any pro- 



- 1 Mir I ritf I hi Hrpon Op»tm> Wimliiw (kl|> 



In^!IIIII?i5£elL_ 



Ufa^asL. 



atak.r»m>ir*uir 



i.. 




^m 



vait 



3g 









"JZ, I Help 



-'^ ■'"■'--■■ 



Microsoft Money looks and sounds so much like Quicken you may 
forget which one you're using, but Money is the simpler of the two- 



ing a single line of program- 
ming and all without the 
knowledge of the user. Ob- 
jectVision is so adept at man- 
aging multiple relations that 
I'm sure many users are al- 
ready creating applications 
that would be regarded as 
quite advanced by data- 
base theorists, even though 
the very same users might 
not know a thing about set 
theory. 

Network users should 
note that even at its surpris- 
ingly low price, ObjectVision 
supports a half-dozen net- 
works if the database files 
are in Paradox format. On 
the other hand, owners of 
small businesses or prospec- 
tive personal users should al- 
so pay close attention, be- 
cause there's no faster way 
I know of to get a high-per- 
formance database written 
than with ObjectVision 2.0. 



gramming languages)? Are 
you a consultant who wants 
to distribute turnkey applica- 
tions with record turna- 
round? Do you need to 
whip together a slick forms 
package for an existing da- 
tabase in dBASE, Paradox, 
ASCII, or BTrieve format? 

If you answered yes to 
any of the above, Ob- 
jectVision is a no-brainer. 
There's no better deal for a 
hundred and fifty bucks. 

TOM CAMPBELL 



IBM PC and compatibles (80286 or 
faster); 1 MB RAM (2MB recommend- 
ed): EGA, VGA, 8514/A, or Hercules: 
2,5MB hard disk space: Windows 
3.0: mouse recommended — $149.95 
($49.95 for upgrade) 

BORLAND INTERNATIONAL 
1800 Green Hills Rd. 
Scotts Valley. CA 95067 
(800)331-0877 
(408) 438-5300 

Circle Reader Service Number 364 



MICROSOFT 
MONEY 

It's never been easy to 
keep track of finances. If 
you think keeping your own 
records is difficult, just re- 
member the Romans. It 
took them ten times the time 
and personnel to keep re- 
cords in Roman numerals 
than it would have if they 
had used the Arabic num- 
ber system. Venetian mer- 
chants used a secret sys- 
tem of Arabic number- 
based recordkeeping that 
has been refined over the 
centuries to the system of 
recordkeeping widely used 
today. The advent of the 
computer has made some 
recordkeeping easier, but 
you still need to learn how to 
use a computer. Microsoft 
Money helps. 

Microsoft Money com- 
bines an easy-to-use inter- 
face, Windows 3.0, with a 
checkbook ledger that has 
been expanded to incorpo- 
rate two special accounting 
journals: the cash payments 
and cash receipts journals. 
For accounting aficionados, 
Money is a cash-basis ac- 
counting system that may re- 
quire an accountant to do 
end-of-year adjustments to 
convert it to an accrual ba- 
sis for certain types of busi- 
nesses. Other end-of-year 
adjustments may be re- 
quired to convert the infor- 
mation to the needed for- 
mat for certain financial 
statements and income tax 
returns. Money comes with 
a variety of foolproof, easy- 
to-use features that will 
make the task of recordkeep- 
ing less painful. 

Money, which was re- 
leased shortly before Intuit's 
Quicken 5.0 for Windows, 
looks very similar to Quicken 
and has many similar fea- 
tures. Its manual even has a 

JULY 1992 COMPUTE 105 



REVIEWS 



chapter especially written 
for Quicken users, and ttie 
program has a feature 
which converts Quicken da- 
ta files to Money's fornnat. 
Even many of r\/loney's com- 
mand keystroke combina- 
tions are borrowed directly 
from Quicken. Money uses 
the same check forms devel- 
oped for Quicken by Deluxe 
Business Systems, which 
are available for dot-matrix 
and laser printers. Money is 
so similar to Quicken that 
they even sound alike. Both 
have the same data entry- 
confirmation beep. With 
Quicken's user base of 
more than 2 million, imitation 
is not just the sincerest form 
of flattery. This type of imita- 
tion is an attempt at 100-per- 
cent compatibility with the in- 
dustry standard. 

Money has some very use- 
ful innovations that go be- 
yond its status as a Quicken 
look-alike. Smart Fill is a fea- 
ture that, on the second and 
subsequent entries of a pay- 
ee or payer, will complete 
the entry of a transaction af- 
ter the first few letters of the 
name are entered. Money 
can also use aliases and 
codes to simplify data entry. 
By using a code for a repet- 
itive transaction, the entire 
transaction will fill in without 
any further input. In making 
data entry significantly easi- 
er. Smart Fill helps encour- 
age the user to enter all trans- 
actions in the system. (An 
incomplete set of records 
can be worse than no re- 
cords at all.) 

Also included with Smart 
Fill is Smart Reconcile, 
which 'takes you step by 
step through the process of 
reconciling your bank state- 
ment. Errors in reconciliation 
are searched for intelligent- 
ly, automating the otherwise 
manual techniques for check- 
ing accounting errors and 
providing hints of what to 

106 COMPUTE JULY 1992 



look for. Transactions in- 
volved in the reconciliation 
are marked with the word rec- 
onciled for future reference. 
Money's Smart Fill and 
Smart Reconcile features 
give you intelligent ways to 
use the computer to make 
the tedious job of record- 



use the check-register for- 
mat and provide for multiple 
files for multiple businesses, 
properties, and accounts. 
Both programs are versatile 
enough to handle all of the 
business and personal finan- 
cial situations of the aver- 
age individual, small busi- 




This island governor's unique rriethod of food consumption is only 
one of many wonders in Monkey Island 2: LeChuck's Revenge. 



keeping significantly easier. 

To Money's detriment, 
Quicken is still the leader in 
available features. Quicken 
can track investments, link 
up to the Checkfree electron- 
ic check-paying network, 
and manage assets. But 
wait — there's more! Quicken 
has links to tax categories, 
more intelligent data entry, 
tv/o check-printing formats, 
loan amortization, percent- 
age allocations, hot-key ac- 
cess to reports and the 
check register, a payroll mod- 
ule, memorized and customi- 
zable reports, two-level pass- 
word security, a more de- 
tailed and useful toolbar, 
and many more categories 
and classes than Money's 
two of each. In many ways. 
Quicken is more versatile 
than Money. And there are 
even more versatile pro- 
grams than Quicken on the 
market — for a higher price. 

Both Money and Quicken 



ness entrepreneur, or prop- 
erty owner. Although neither 
Money nor Quicken is the 
be-all and end-all of account- 
ing systems, both are good 
programs. Each may re- 
quire some inteiligent setup 
and some analysis at the 
end of the year to make it 
useful. If you need the ex- 
panded versatility of Quick- 
en, Money may not be the 
way to go. But if it's a sim- 
ple, attractive, easy-to-use, 
foolproof system that you 
need, then Money beats 
Quicken hands down. 

ALFRED C GIOVETTI 



!BM PC and compatibles (80286 or 
faster), EGA or VGA, 1,7Ma hard 
drive space, Windows 3,0. printer (to 
print chiecks): Microsoft or compati- 
ble mouse recommended— $69.95 

MICROSOFT 

One Microsott Way 

Redmond, WA 98052-6399 

(800) 426-9400 

(206) 802-8080 

Circle Reader Service Number 365 



MONKEY ISLAND 
2: LECHUCK'S 
REVENGE 

Consult your recipe for Peg 
Leg Rot and swig a hearty 
mug of grog, Guybrush 
Threepwood, goofball hero 
of Lucasfilm Games' The Se- 
cret of Monkey Island, has re- 
turned in Monkey Island 2: 
LeChuck's Revenge to do 
battle yet again with his de- 
composing nemesis, the 
ghost pirate LeChuck. 

The games in the Monkey 
Island series are brightly an- 
imated adventures with a pi- 
rate-era setting and a 
warped sense of humor. 
You wear the paltry beard of 
Guybrush Threepwood, a pi- 
rate wannabe at the begin- 
ning of The Secret of Mon- 
key Island and a LeChuck- 
conquering hero as Monkey 
Island 2 begins. I couldn't 
get far enough in the first 
game to lay eyes on 
LeChuck, however, much 
less defeat him. 

Fortunately, Monkey Is- 
land 2 features an optional 
Easy mode "for beginners 
and magazine reviewers." 
(Ahem.) Unfortunately, even 
when playing "Monkey 2 
Lite," I still couldn't figure 
out a way for Guybrush to 
vanquish LeChuck in round 
2 of their ongoing enmity. 
My Guybrush remains lost un- 
der Dinky Island, getting 
zapped from room to room 
whenever LeChuck puts the 
pins to his Guybrush voo- 
doo doll. 

Whether you have better 
luck playing this game or 
not, you'll enjoy yourself. Un- 
like many other adventure 
games, Lucasfilm games ac- 
tually encourage you to 
take chances — and to take 
it easy. As Guybrush, you 
can spout rude putdowns at 
unfriendly guards without 



Enhance Your Tandy ® 



Hard Cards 

For 1000, A, SX, TX, SL, 
TL, SL/2, TL/2, TL/3, IBM 

42 Meg 28 MS $299 

68 Meg 23 MS $359 

85 Meg 16 MS $399 

105 Meg 16 MS $469 

130 Meg 15 MS $499 

210 Meg 15 MS $689 

IS Month Warranty, 30 Day Money Back Guarantee. TOLL FREE Help Line. 



1000 EX / HX 

External Hard Drives 
Complete With Controller 

42 Meg 28 MS $399 
68 Meg 23 MS $425 
85 Meg 16 MS $429 
105 Meg 16 MS $489 
130 Meg 15 MS $529 
210 Meg 15 MS $699 



1000 HX 

Internal Hard Drive 
Complete. Replaces a Floppy 

42 Meg 28 MS $299 
85 Meg 16 MS $389 
105 Meg 16 MS $449 
130 Meg 15 MS $539 

IDE "SmartDrive" 

For TL/2, RL, TL/3, RLX 

42 Meg 28 MS $289 



Memory Board to 640K, Chipsets 

1000, A to 640K W/Glock, Serial $229 

256K EX or HX to 640K 

256K1200orIBMto640K 

384K SX, EX, HX, SL to 640K 

TX, TL, TL/2, TL/3 to 768K 

3000 NL from 512K to 640K 

1000 RL to 768K 



1000 RLX to One Meg 



$149 
$189 
$ 49 
$ 49 
$ 49 
$ 39 
$ 39 



Over 640K Memory Boards 

Micro Mainframe 5150T EMS Board 

More Space for Spreadsheets, Windows, -"^ and More 
Complete With LIMM 4.0 

1 Meg installed $229 

2 Meg installed $249 

1 Meg for 1500 or 2810 Laptops 

Also for Panasonic CF-170, 270, 370 $129 



Floppy Drives 



Capacity 

360K 

1.2 Meg 
720K 
1.44 Meg 



Internal 

$ 99 
$159 
$109 
$159 



EX/HX CD-ROM Drives 

External External For lOOO's*, IBM, compatibles, Slot Box 

$199 $129 Internal CD ROM Drive $369 

$199 N/A External CD ROM Drive $449 

$ 1 99 $ 129 *Note: EX or HX must have Slot Box 

$ 1 99 N/A Call for CD Titles available 



SLOT BOX Seven fuU length slots, three 5.25" 
drivebays, one3.5"drivebay. Power and hard drive 
lights. 200 Watt power supply, cooling fan. At- 
taches to EX, HX, 1000, A, SX. TX, SL, TL, SL/2, 

TL/2, RL, TL/3, RLX. $279 



m 


^ 




^ 




SLOT BOX 


^ 


^ 


bl . ' fa 


1 



"..Provides the ideal upgrade path.."-PCM Dec 91 



Modems and Faxes 

Hayes Compatible, 

2400 Baud Internal 
2400 Baud External 
9600 Baud Internal 
Fax/Modem Internal 

2400 Baud Modem, 9600 
Baud Send/Receive Fax 

360dpi Mouse 
Serial Card 



$ 79 
$ 99 
$349 



$159 
$ 49 
$ 29 



Serial Card EX/HX $ 49 



VGA Combinations 

For SX, TX, SL, TL, SIJ2, TI72, 
RL, TUS, IBM, compatibles 

Combo 1 

14" CTX Monitor 
256K VGA Card 
640X480 $489 

Super Combo 

14" CTX Monitor 
1 Meg VGA Card 
1024 X 768 $589 



Tandy, Hayes, IBM, Window.';, are registered Trademarks 
Price.-, subject to change without notice. 




5265 Hebbardsville Rd 
Athens, Ohio 45701 

1-800=537^ 

(614)-592-4239 Foreign (614)-592-1527 FAX 

C.O.D. 




AMERICAN 
EXPRESS 






Circle Reader Service Number 1 20 



Upgrading Your Tandy 

210 Pages on performance enhancing 
upgrades and installation. Covers all 
lOOO's Series computers $19.95 




Speed Up Chips 

lOOO. A, SX, EX, HX, 
50% Faster $29.95 
PC Sprint 100% Faster 
lOOO, A, IBM XT $75 



Math Coprocessors 

TX, TL, TL/2, TL/3, 80286s 

Now only $139 

Math Sprint Socket $59.00 

Makes 80287 up to 200% faster 



REVIEWS 



fear of reprisal, and you can 
venture into unfamiliar plac- 
es — a skull-shaped voodoo 
hut hidden in a sw/amp, the 
bedroom of an unconscious 
island governor who avi/ak- 
ens only long enough to 
open his mouth for a spray 
of food from bedside 
tubes — without having to wor- 
ry about sudden death. 

Along with this easygoing 
approach, you'll find engag- 
ing animated scenes, from 
closeups of navigational 
maps detailing peril-fraught 
seas {avoid the Forbidden 
Rhombus and the Forbid- 
den Right Circular Conic 
Cross-Section) to topograph- 
ical macro views of the is- 
lands Guybrush wanders. Be- 
fore he even encounters the 
newly reanimated LeChuck, 
Guybrush must search for 
clues to lead him to the lost 
treasure that's every pirate's 
dream: Big Whoop. The ani- 
mated game has a cinemat- 
ic feel, from the lovely open- 
ing shot of Scabb Island to 
the mood-setting music. 

Monkey Island 2 is worth 
playing for the sounds 
alone. I first tried it using on- 
ly my computer's internal 
speaker, then ran it through 
a Covox Sound Master II. 
The difference was astound- 
ing. A game of adequate, 
squawking sound effects 
quickly became something 
akin to a movie, with impres- 
sive flourishes of sound to 
accompany every tumble 
and capture. The music 
was even more impressive, 
with clattering Caribbean 
rhythms enlivening the open- 
ing credits, jaunty pirate mu- 
sic accompanying the open- 
ing scene, and springy reg- 
gae sounds emanating from 
the speakers every time 
Guybrush boarded the ship 
of the dreadlocked Captain 
Dread. 

Combine that music with 
fine animation and abun- 

108 COMPUTE JULY 1992 




II may have more power than you neea. but the Practical 
Peripherals PM9600 is an excellent 9600-bps modem. 



dant humor, and you have 
as enjoyable an adventure 
game as anyone could 
hope for — even if you never 
do vanquish LeChuck. 

EDDIE HUFFMAN 



IBM PC and compatibles (10-MHz 
80286 or faster), 640K RAM, MCGA 
or VGA. 1.2MB SVS-inch floppy 
drive or hard drive- supports Ad Lib 
Roland, Sound Blaster, and Sound 
Master II— $59,95 

LUCASFILM GAMES 

P.O. Box 10307 

San Rafael. CA 92912 

(800) 245-4525 

Cirde Reader Service Number 365 



PRACTICAL 

PERIPHERALS 

PM9600 

Macros and programming 
make telecommunications 
faster, but how about get- 
ting the information across 
the telephone lines more 
quickly — say, four times fast- 
er than the standard 2400- 
bps modem? I had a 
chance to try out the Practi- 
cal Peripherals PM9600 mo- 
dem and liked it so much I 
bought one for myself. I've in- 
stalled a variety of modems 
for COMPUTE'S staff, but 
this one really grabbed my at- 



tention. It was easy to install 
and configure, and it 
worked perfectly the first 
time I used it. 

Before you consider buy- 
ing the PM9600, ask your- 
self if you need a 9600-bps 
modem. Although theoretical- 
ly it's four times faster than a 
2400-bps modem, that's true 
only when your computer is 
talking directly to another com- 
puter or when you're on a bul- 
letin board system. When 
you're connected to online 
services, delays introduced 
at every stage of the connec- 
tion will reduce your effective 
transmission rate to some- 
thing less than four times the 
rate of a 24G0-bps modem. 

Here's how 2400 bps and 
9600 bps compare on my 
computer when I download 
files from GEnie, At 2400 
bps. the transfer rate is 
around 138 characters per 
second (cps); at 9600 bps, 
it's about 340 cps, That's 
roughly 2V2 times as fast. 

Bear in mind, too, that 
9600-bps connect charges 
are greater. You pay a high- 
er hourly rate when connect- 
ed at the faster speed. How- 
ever, you'll still end up sav- 
ing if you're downloading 
many files. And it's an even 
greater savings if you're pay- 



ing long-distance charges. 

Another good point: This 
internal modem is incredibly 
simple to install and run. I 
opened up my computer 
and removed the old mo- 
dem; then I looked at the 
back of the Practical Periph- 
erals modem where the 
COM port switches are locat- 
ed (and thoughtfully marked) 
to make sure it was set to 
COM 1, After inserting the 
card in a slot, I closed the 
computer and turned it on, I 
ran my telecommunications 
software, set it for 9600 bps, 
and took off. I experienced 
no interrupt or IRQ conflicts, 
had no oddball initialization 
strings to deal with, and 
faced nothing incompatible 
or out of the ordinary. 

How did the modem 
work? Great. You might ex- 
pect line noise and extrane- 
ous garbage to enter the da- 
ta stream, since the transfer 
speed is much greater, but 
I didn't find that to be true. 
In fact, I experienced less 
line noise with this modem 
than with some 2400-bps mo- 
dems I've used. It seems 
that Practical Peripherals' sys- 
tem of noise filtering is up to 
the task of the extra speed. 

These modems are great 
for remote-control comput- 
ing, too. For regular system 
use like reading messages, 
though, a 9600-bps probably 
isn't worth the money unless 
you're impatient and willing 
to pay for fast menu and text- 
file updates. 

If you're thinking about buy- 
ing a modem or upgrading 
the one you have, though, 
consider the PM9600. It's an 
excellent choice, 

RICHARD C. LEINECKER 

Practical Periptierals PM960&— $599 

PRACTICAL PERIPHERALS 
31245 La Baya Dr. 
Westlake Village. CA 91362 
(800) 442-4774 

Circle Reader Service Number 367 



ZERO'S & ONE'S PC WAREHOUSE 

7525 Rosecrans Ave., #203, Paramount, CA 90723 

310-630-3551 (information) 8-5 M-F * 31 0-634-7745 (FAX) 24-hours 

800-788-2193 (orders) 8-6 M-F, 9-4 Sa p.s.t. 

ALL IBM COMPATIBLE 




SOUNDBOARDS 



ATI Stereo F/X 147.95 
ProAudio Spec +189-95 
ProAudio 16-bit 229.95 
Roland LAPCl 399.95 
Sound BIst Pro 189.95 



SoundBlaster 114,95 
Sounds MCA 219.95 
Sound BC/MS 25.95 
Sound Comndr + 69.95 
Thunderboard 99.95 



JOYSTICKS AND MICE 



Aviator Fit Yoke 31.95 

TM Throttle 84.95 

Joystick 69.95 

CH Flight Stick 41.95 

CH Mach tl 24.95 

CH Macti III 29.95 

Winner Pistol 24.95 

Winner Yoke 46.95 

Gravis gamepad 24.95 

Gravis stick 33.95 



MICE 

3-Button 17.95 

Logitech 

Mouseman 69.95 

Rollerballs call 

Microsoft OEM 79.95 

Ganne Cards 

Economy 9.95 

Hi-speed 19.95 

CH game III 28.95 



MATH CO-PROCESSORS 

3087 SX- 16 3037-25 call 

3C87SX-20 3087-33 for 

3 CS 7SX-25 3087.40 prices 



MULTI MEDIA 

CLabs MM CDR Drive & bndl for SB Pro 369.95 
CLabs MM CDR Drive & bndl w/SB Pro 559.95 
MediaVis kit w/ProAudioSpec Plus 769.95 
MediaVis kit w/ProAudioSpec 16 959.95 
Sony C D U 535 inte rn al w/car d 349 .95 
Sony ODU 535 external w/card 399.95 
Computer Eyes RT 434.95 
Computer Eyes Pro 299.95 
Xapshot Camera, Oanon RC-250 459.99 
C ALL for other C DR products 



EDUCATIONAL ENTERTAINMENT 



ACT Studyware 29.95 
Alge-Blaster Pius 29,95 
Algebra +,v.2 32,95 
Barbie Design 15,95 
Barbie Fashion 24.95 
Beauty&B.PrntKit 14.95 
Bodyworks 47.95 

Carmen San Diego grp 
Castle Dr. Brain 29.95 
Chal Anc Empire 29.95 
Comic Bk Creatr 19.95 
Dance Planets 149.95 
Destination Mars 34.95 
D Tracy Prim Kit 14.95 
Dinosaur Designr 19.95 
Disney Snd Srce 26.95 
Df, Quandry 35.95 

Earthquest 35.95 

EcoQuest 33.95 

EcoSaurus 24,95 

GMAT Studyware 29.95 
GRE Studyware 29.95 
Joshua Reading 29.95 
Kid Fix 34.95 

Kid Works 29.95 

Knowledge Adv. 47.95 
LSAT Studyware 35.95 
Marvin Moose 31,95 
Malh Blaster + 29,95 
Math Climber 6.95 
Malh Mystery 29,95 
Math Rabbit 25,95 

Math Zone 32,95 

M, Beacon Type 31,95 
McGee 24,95 

McGee at Fair 24,95 
McG Katie Farm 24,95 
Melrognm Music 29.95 
Mickey's ABC 24,95 
Mickey's ABCw/ 
sound source 37,95 
Mickey's 123 24,95 
Mickey/M PrntKit 14,95 
Mickey Orosswrd 19.95 
Mickey Jigsaw 29.95 
Mickey's Zoo 12.95 
Midnite Rescue 29,95 



Mixed Fairy Tales 29,95 

Mixed M, Goose 41.95 

Mutanoid Math 26.95 

My Letters 26.95 

Newsroom 14.95 

Nigel's World 35.95 

Numbr Munchrs 29,95 
Once Upon a Time 

Stories 29,95 

Puppets 29,95 

Oper, Neptune 34,95 

Orbits 35,95 

Oregon Trail 29,95 

Out Numbered 29,95 

PC Globe 4,0 39,95 

PC USA 2,0 29,95 

Phonics Plus 26,95 

Playroom 27.95 

Pfin of Biology 24.95 

Prin o( Calculus 29.95 

Prin of Chemstry 24.95 

Prin of Econmcs 24,95 

Prin of Physics 24,95 
Randm Hs Encyc 71,95 

Reader Rabbit 29,95 

SAT PersnITrainr 29.95 

Second Math 32.95 

See the U.S.A. 28.95 

Speed Reader 29.95 

Spell-a-Saurus 29.95 

Spellbound 31.95 

Spell It -f 29.95 

Stickybear Read 24,95 

Stickybear Type 29,95 

Story Teller I 31,95 

Story Teller II 31,95 

Super Mario 21,95 

SuperMunchers 29 95 

Think Quick 31,95 

Treasure Mtn 29-95 

Treehouse 34,95 

Typing Tutor 5 29,95 
What's My Angle 

(geometry) 29.95 

Word Munchrs 29.95 

World Atlas{Win.) 49,95 

Write & Publish 39,95 



GAMES 

A-IQETnnkKillsr 35,9S 
Advanced O&D series call 
ADDJreas Savg Frntief 31, 9S 
Aclion 5:SilpheedTriexdel, 
FireHawk. Ziliafd, 

Oil's Well 4<t.9S 

Aclion Slolion* 29.95 

AS: Scenario 15.95 

Allied Forces 41.95 

Amer Civ War, I 24.95 

Amer Civ War, II 24.95 

Amer Civ War. Ill 24,95 

American Giadialors 24,95 

Armada 2S25 29,95 

Armor Alley 26,95 

Asl'ology, Visions 24,95 

Alomind 29,95 

ATPFIIghlAssgn 36.95 
BacK to Fulure eeriee 
Bandil King AncChlna 35,95 

Bane Cosmic Forge 33,95 

Bards Tales III ?9,9S 

Bards Tale ConsU,Sel 33,95 

Ban Simpson 29,95 

Banle Command 22,95 

Ealtle of Napoleon 31,95 

Berlin 1949 25.95 

BloocJwych 24,95 

Breach 2 IS. 95 

Caslle ol [Jr, Brain 29.95 

Caslles 35.85 

Chip's Challngo 25.95 

Civiliralion 33.95 

Colonels Bequesi 35,95 

Command HQ 35.95 

Conan 29-95 

Conflict: Korea 39.95 
Conquest of LongBow 39.95 

Corporation 29.95 

Countdown 31.95 

Cover! Action 29.95 

Danger Zone 29,95 

DarK Spyre 25,95 

Decision at Gettysbrq 23,95 

Design own RaJiroad 34,95 

D-Genefalicn 31,95 
Dragon's Lair series 

Dusk of tfie Gods 37,95 

Elite Plus 29-95 
Etvjra series 

F-117A Nlgtilhawh 44.95 

F-14 Tomcat 26,95 

F.15 Strike Eagle It 29,95 

Faergfiail, Legend o' 25,95 

Falcon 3.0 44.95 

Figfilmg (or Rome 29.95 

Final Conllicl 24.95 

Fire Team 2300 29,95 

Flight of the Inlruber 32.35 

FllglitSlmJ.O 37.95 

FS Aircraft K Scenery 27.95 

FS Scenery:CA /NEV 35.95 

FS Instrument PS 59.95 

FS Mallard upgrade 26.95 

FS Scenery disks 19,95 

Four Crystals Trajere 31,95 

Free D,C, 39,95 

Future Wars 29,95 

Genghis Kfian 35,95 

Gtobdl Conquest 35,95 

) Godlalher 29,95 

Grailquest 24,96 

I Sunstiip 2000 39,95 

I Hard Nova 19.95 

i Hare Raising Havoc 29.95 
I Harpoon senes 

Heart of China 35.95 

Hill Street Blues 24.95 

Home Alone 24,95 

Hyperspeed 34,95 

Immortal, The 19,95 

Jndy Jones IV 38, 9b 

JBond:Steallh Aflair 29,95 

Jetfighler li 39,95 
Kings Quest senes 

Knights of Sky 29 95 
Leis,Sijil Larry series 

Lemmings 29,95 
Les WanTey senes 

LHX Chopper 25,95 

Lile & Death 23,95 

Life & DeathtThe Brain 25,95 

Lighispeed 29,95 
Little Wermaid/Beauly 

and Beast print kit 19.95 

Loom 19 95 
Lord of Rings series 

Lost Admiral 35.95 

MacAnhur's War 29.95 

Magic Candle II 36.95 

Manhunler 2 29.95 

^^anlac Mansion 16.95 

Marllan Dreams 35.95 

Martian Memorandum 34,95 

Map/el Tnlogy 22,95 

Matrix Cubed 31,95 

Meon Streets 35,95 

WegaFonress 36-95 

f-tission disk 25,95 

I f^egaTraveler II 32,95 



^10-29 Fulcrum 29,95 
Might Si Magic series 

Wiilennium 2fl,9S 

Mjsslon Impossible 29,95 

Murder 29.95 

riobunaga Ambition II 34.95 

No Greaier 3lory 45.95 

Nova 9 21.95 

Nuclear War 31.95 

Obitus 29,95 

Operation Combat 29,95 

Overlord 29,95 

Panzer Battles 21,95 

Paperlaoy 2 26,95 

Panon Strikes Back 35,95 

Perfect General 35,95 
Peter Pan/Robin Hood 

print kit 19,95 

Planet's Edge 36,95 
Police Guest series 

Power Monger 33,95 

Predators 14,95 

Prince of Persia 29,95 

Ouest for Glory 35,95 

Red Baton VGA 39-95 

Rise of Dragon 34,95 

Romance 3 Kingdm II 39,95 

Railroad Tycoon 32,95 

Rocketeer 29,95 

Rules ol Engagement 36,95 

Sea Rogue 35,95 

SeconcTFront 3S,95 
Secret Monkey Island series 

Secret Weapons Lutt 42.95 

add-ons 19.95 

Sen Olympics 24.95 

Shuttle 35,95 

Sierra Network 19.95 

Silent Serylce II 31,95 

Sim Ant 35.95 

Sim City 29.95 

Sim City Graphic 21,95 

Sim Earth 42.95 

Sleeping Gods Lie 26.95 

Space 1889 26.95 

Space Ace 11 35,95 

Space Ouest IV vga 37.95 
Spellcasting series 

Spiderman 24.95 

Spirit of Excalibur 29.95 

Star Oonlrol 29,95 

Slor Trek 25lh Annlv. 35,95 

SteBar 7 24,95 

Slrateqo 29,95 

TeentJinja Turtle Arcd, 24,95 

Terminator II 39,95 

Their Finest Hour 43,95 

ThexdertFirehawk 22,95 

Thunderhawk 31,95 

Time Quest 29,95 

Twilight 20(XI 34,95 

Typhoon ol Steel 38,95 

LIttlma series call 

UMSII 29,95 

UMS Planet Ed, 29,95 

Uncharted Water 41,95 

Venqence of Excalibur 29,95 

Warlords 29,95 

Weslern Front 3?, 95 

Willie Beamish 39.95 
Wing Commander seres 

Wizardry series call 

Wonderland 35,95 

Worlds at War 29,95 

V/rath of Demons 29,95 

Xenoclde 28.95 

Yeager AirCmbt 36,95 

BOARD, CARD AND 

SHOW GAMES 



AnteUp Poker 


24,95 


Backgammon 


19.95 


Battle Chess 


29.95 


Bailie Chess II 


29-95 


Blackjack 


29,95 


Bridge Baron 


29,95 


Bridge Companion 


34,95 


Bridge Grand Siam 


21,96 


Bridge Qmat Sharif 


29,95 


Bridge Truscott 


22,9S 


Bridge Win in 5 wks 


24,95 


Casino Master 


44,95 


Casinos of the World 


29,95 


Chessmaster 3000 


31,95 


Craps 


19,95 


Cribbage 


27,95 


Crossvrord Magic 


31,95 


Dealer's Choice 


29 95 


Femme Fatate 


24.95 


Four Queens Casino 


24-95 


Go Junior 


22,95 


Go Master 


42,95 


Hoyle 111 


29,95 


Ishido 


32,95 


Klotski 


24,95 


Lexicross 


29,95 


Monopoly 


24,95 


Puzzle Master 


29-95 


Puiites & Mazes 


14,95 


Ask 


24,95 


Scrabble Deluxe 


35.95 



Sfiogi Master 


32,95 


Solitaire feicycle) 
Solitaire iHoyle If} 


29,95 


22,95 


Solitaire Royale 


21,95 


Strip Poker 


29,95 


add-on disks 


16,95 


Super Jeopardy 


24,95 


Super Tetr^s 


29,95 


Totris 


19,95 


Troika 


17.95 


Trump Castle II 


29,95 


Welllns 


19,95 


Wheel of Fortune 


23,95 


Wordtris 


27,95 


HOME i OFFICE 


Animation, Paint 


84,95 


Animation Studio 


77.95 


AuloMap 


59.95 


CheckFree 


49.95 


Cookbook 


29,95 


Cookbook Plus 


41,95 


Deluxe Paint li 


95,95 


Dvorak Typirig 
Evervbodys Planner 
Fa/ Side calendar 


29,95 


52,95 


47,95 


Genealogy, Horizons 


24,95 


Grade Quick 


47,95 


Jobhunt 


29,95 


Objection! 


29,95 


Studio of Greetings 


43,95 


Tempra Pro 


299,95 


Tempra GIF 


114,95 


Tempra Show 


99,95 


Vehicle Records 


35,95 


Virtual Reality Studio 


51,95 


Vista Pro 


77,95 


Wedding Planner 


33,95 


SPORTS 





Andretti Racing Chal, 19,95 

Bo Jackson Baseball 29,95 

Boxing, 4D 19,95 

College Football 35,95 

Faceotf 14,95 

Hardball II 29,95 

Hockey Leag, Sim, 27,95 

JConner Tennis 31,95 

Joe Montana Foolball 29.95 

JMaiJden Football 29.95 

JNicklaus Golf 34.95 

JNtcXIaus Signature 41.95 

Links 36.95 

add-ons 15,95 

MIcroleag.FootballDIx 41,95 

fttike Oilka Football 32,95 

hAolocross 19,95 

l^ascar Challenge 29,95 

NFL PRO Foolball 44,95 

Pit Fighter 25,95 

Playmaker Football 34,95 

Sharkey 3D Pool li,95 

Speedball 2 24,95 

Sports Adventure 47,95 

Stunt Driver 29-95 
Tony LaRussa Baseball 29,95 

Team Suzuki 24,95 

Test Dhve II 29,95 

Test Drive 111 34,95 

W,Grellky Hockey 2 33,95 

Weaver Baseball II 31,95 

Wide World Boxing 29,95 



WINDOWS 



Battle Chess 
Briefcase calendar 
Casino Pack m 
Chassmasler 30OO 
Chessnet 
Diet Pro 
Distant Suns 
Far Side calendar 
Golf Companion 
Herman caJandar 
Laffer Utilities 
MBeacon Typing 
Entertain, Paks, each 
Money Manager 
MS Excel ver 4,0 
MSver3,l 
MS ver 3,1 upgrade 
MS Works 
Perks, utilities 
Pixel Puzzle 
Risk 

Screen Works 
Sim Eailh 

Spanish vocabulary 
Speed Reader 
Super Tetris 
Typing Tutor 5 
Lr,S,Atlas 3,0 
Waves, sounds 
Windows 3.1 
Windows 3.1 upgrade 
Wired for Sountf 
World Alias 



29.95 
29.95 
31.95 
37.95 
31.95 
34.95 
47.95 
49.95 
24.95 
19,95 
25,95 
37,95 
27,95 
19,95 

299,95 
89.95 
49.95 

1 29.95 
24.95 
39.95 
29.95 
19.95 
42.95 
41.95 
29,95 
29,95 
29,95 
49,95 
19,95 
69,95 
49,95 
32,95 
49,95 



CD ROMS 

All Abt Science 249.95 
Amei',Bus.Phnbk 39,95 
Annabel's Drearrt 62.95 
Apollo 50.95 

Batik Design 29,95 
Bible Library 53.95 
Britan,Fam,Chce 74.95 
Carmn S.Diego 69.95 
Case Caut.Condr 38.95 
CIA World Facts 32,95 
CIA World Tour 67.95 
CD Directory 109.95 
Classic Fairy TIs 72.95 
Coates Art Revue 53.95 
Corel Artshow 91 72.95 
Elec.Horne Libry 74.95 
Family Doctor 107,95 
Fooii Analyst 51.95 
Ganne Collection 49.95 
Golden Immortal 29.95 
Grab Bag 24,95 

Grandma Sn Me call 
Greatest Books 37.95 
Jones Fast Lane 40,95 
Jungle Safari 72.95 
KGB World Facts 38,95 
King's Quest V 41,95 
LangGame/Fren 59,95 
LangGame/Span 59.95 
Langs of World 51.95 
Magazine Rack 46.95 
Mastering Math 129.95 
Mixed M. Goose 45,95 
Monarch Cliff Nts74.95 
Movie DirDatabse47.95 
MSDOS archives 31.95 
MS Stat Pack 89.95 
Murdr Stf.Dedfelo38.95 
Night Owl's 4.1 29.95 
Niaht Owl's 5.0 44.95 
PC-SIG 10th Ed 195.95 
Phoenix 2.0 33.95 

Pixel Garden 64,95 
Proqramer ROM 58,95 
HBBSinaBox 41.95 
Reasoning Skills 59.95 
HogEbert Movies 32.95 
Shakespear lllust. 29.95 
Shks Comp Wks 22.95 
Sharewre Gold II 39,95 
Sharewre Xpress 33.95 
Sherlock Holmes 29,95 
SH Consult Del, 43,95 
SH Hound Bskvl 43,95 
Sleeping Beauty 36,95 
SoMuchSharewfe29,95 
Spanish, Learn 72.95 
Stellar 7 40.95 

Street Atlas (win) call 
TimeTbl Arts &E 73,95 
TimeTbl Science 85.95 
Toolwks Ret Libr 98.95 
Ultima I - VI 82.95 

USAFactbook 51.95 
US Presidents 51.95 
US Wars, each 51.95 
US/World Atlas 86.95 
VGA Spectrum 29.95 
Vintage AJoha 29.95 
WCIw/Msns 1&2 69.95 
WCI w/Ulfinna VI 69.95 
Wild Places 38.95 

Women Motion 43.95 
World Factbk'92 67,95 
World View 29.95 

CDROM MFC 

American Vista 59,95 
Autodesk Expir 127,95 
Battle Chess 47,95 
Beethoven MM 59,95 
Chessmstr 3000 69.95 
Composr Quest 69.95 
Dictnry.Children 43.95 
Elec. Library Art 72.95 
Guiness Records 74.95 
Mammal encyc. 84.95 
MBeacon Typing 69.95 
MS Bookshelf 139.95 
MS Works (win) 134.95 
Spirit Exoahbur 37.95 
US Atlas, win 93.95 



Prices and availability subject to change. All sales final. We do not guarantee compatability, A)l software is 
factory fresh and unopened. We are not responsible for manufacturer's defects. Contact publisher 
regarding defects. Shipping: 1st game $5i add'l games add $1 each in Cont, US, 2nd Day Air $6 1st 
game, add'l games add $1 each in Cont. US. COD add $4, CA residents add 7,75% tax, All prices are LIS S 



^^^^^ 




Here's the official flint 
book for the popu- 
lar series of Nintendo 
games from Konami. This 
is the book that tells all. 
Includes background infor- 
mation, complete maps, 
tips for defeating the ene- 
mies, concise descriptions 
of each of the weapons, 
and solutions to each of the 
Casfievonia adventures, 
including the new Game 
Boy adventure, Belmont's 
Revenge. 

To order your copy, send $9.95 
plus $2.00 shipping and handling 
U.S. ($4 to Canada, $6 other) to 
COMPUTE Books, c/o CCC, 
2500 McClellan Ave., Pennsau- 
ken, NJ 08109. (Residents of NC, 
NJ, and NY please add appropri- 
ate sales tax.) 

All orders must be paid in U.S. funds 
drawn on a U.S. bank. Orders will be 
shipped via UPS Ground Service. Of- 
fer good while supplies last. 



REVIEWS 

NFL 

Couch coaches looking for ttie ultimate 
football computer game might end 
their search with Konami's NFL. a foot- 
ball simulation program that lets ttie 
player compete in botti statistical and 
hands-on, arcade-style football. Witti a 
huge selection of options, there's little 
in the game that can't be manipulated 
in some fashion or another, yielding a 
sports contest that will please any 
type of player. 




i_ .^; gffi . : Pjgg. ^- _i ^m* 



Frustrated with pro football? Run the 
league yourself with NFL. 

Before the game begins, you can 
choose from several keyboard and joy- 
stick configurations, as well as set ei- 
ther player as a computer-run oppo- 
nent. In addition, you determine wheth- 
er you'll be playing a statistical game 
(coach only) and whether you'll 
choose player substitutions and drafts 
or leave these chores to the computer. 
You also have the ability to toggle such 
options as penalties, weather conditions, 
player fatigue, and player injuries. 

After configuring NFL, you're offered 
three game modes: Training Camp, Pre- 
season Game, and Road to the Super 
Bowl. In the training camp, you edit 
teams, players, and your playbook, as 
well as run through your plays on the 
practice field. In a preseason game, 
you choose two teams to battle it out in 
a single game. Finally, on the road to 
the Super Bowl, you create your own 
league and set off for the ultimate foot- 
ball victory. In this game mode, you'll 
not only play football but also scout out 
your opponents, review your weekly 
schedule, analyze player and game sta- 
tistics, trace your progress on the play- 
off tree, and participate in drafts and 
trades. 

Once on the field, if you've chosen 
the coach-only option, you need do tit- 
tle more than select your team's plays 
and watch the computer run them. 
However, if you've decided on the 
hands-on approach, you must control 
your players on the field after you've giv- 
en them their plays. Since NFL is a fair- 
ly complete simulation, controlling 



your players well takes practice. You 
can choose from many plays, including 
passing, receiving, diving, straight-arm- 
ing a defender, punting, and tackling. 

After a play is completed, the instant- 
replay option offers a chance to ana- 
lyze your team's efforts. With the VCR- 
type controller, you can view the play 
at different speeds or even frame by 
frame, as well as change the viewing 
angle. Other controls include rewind 
and stop. 

NFL features digitized voices and ef- 
fects throughout, and although you'll 
get the best audio results by using a 
sound card like Sound Blaster, the pro- 
gram wrings some surprising sound 
even from your PC's lowly built-in speak- 
er In addition, the graphics and anima- 
tion are all top quality, providing a re- 
alistic and fun sports simulation. 

Because it can be configured for dif- 
ferent depths of gameplay, NFL is a 
great choice for any football fan. 
Those who like to get their hands dirty 
with the details of handling a league 
have plenty to keep them busy, where- 
as players who just want to grunt and 
sweat can march right out onto the 
field, ignoring the editing options. For 
either type of football fan, NFL comes 
highly recommended. 

CLAYTON WALNUM 

IBM PC and compatibles; 640K RAM; EGA, 
MCGA, or VGA; supports Ad Lib, Sound Blaster, 
and Roland sound; ioystick and hard drive recom- 
mended— $49.95 

KONAMI 

900 Deeriield Pkwy. 

Buffalo Grove, IL 60089 

(708)215-5111 

Circle Reader Service Number 36S 

QUICKVERSE 2.0 

Students of the Bible sometimes need 
serious tools to further their studies. 
QuickVerse 2.0 delivers an onscreen Bi- 
ble that practically invites serious 
study. With several popular translations 
of the Bible available, along with He- 
brew and Greek Transliterated Bible, 
this Parsons Technology product can 
give scriptural scholars some welcome 
assistance. 

The QuickVerse screen remains 
neat and uncluttered, even when simul- 
taneously displaying multiple transla- 
tions. A function bar along the top pro- 
vides access to pop-up menus detail- 
ing specific program functions (easy-to- 
recall keyboard shortcuts are also 
available). But most of the screen is 
devoted to the text area, which dis- 
plays up to four windows of single- 
spaced text. With all four active, your 
computer presents two rows of two win- 
dows each. No side-by-side arrange- 
ment is available, making parallel stud- 



no COI\^PUTE JULY 1992 



ies slightly more tiresome than with 
other packages. 

One text window is always designat- 
ed as the active window, and you navi- 
gate therein using the Home, End. 
Page Up, Page Down, and cursor 
keys, Text in the active window can 
scroll independently or in synchroniza- 
tion with identical references in other 
windows. Synchronization, however, is 
an atl-or-nothing prospect. If you want 
to sync any windows, you'll have to 
sync them all. 

It's fascinating to read a passage 
while there are multiple translations on- 
screen for easy comparison, and most 
users will spend much time doing just 
that. But QuickVerse's search features 
make the program really notable. Say 
a particular word catches your inter- 
est — forgiveness, for instance. Quick- 
Verse can search out and identify eve- 
ry occurrence within the text, listing 
them all on your screen. You can then 
look at individual occurrences or step 
through them one at a time. Quick- 
Verse ignores case but not punctua- 
tion — a trait that you can use to add pre- 
cision to your searches, 

What if you don't know how to spell 
the word you want to find? If you want 
to find Nebuchadnezzar, for example, 
just check the alphabetical listing of all 
words occurring in the current trans- 
lation. Alternately, use QuickVerse's 
wildcard feature. Type the first few let- 
ters followed by an asterisk (in this 
case, neb'), and you'll find all passag- 
es containing words beginning with the 
letters neb. Unfortunately, the wildcard 
feature works only at the end of a 
word, so an educated guess at the 
first few letters can prove crucial. 

Looking for related words? Boolean 
search capabilities allow you to pin- 
point verses containing specific combi- 
nations of words or any of several giv- 
en words. There is no way to search 
for words occurring a given distance 
apart (for example, the word forgive- 
ness when it's located within five 
words of the word neighbor), but the 
Boolean approach actually seems to 
be more useful. 

How about phrases'? QuickVerse 
searches for phrases of up to ten 
words or 127 characters, whichever 
comes first. Punctuation need not be 
included, so there's no need to worry 
about all those commas. Phrase search- 
es stop at verse boundaries, however. 
In fact, if you try looking for a phrase 
that crosses verse boundaries, the pro- 
gram will teil ycu that it's not in the 
Bible. 

In any case, you can easily set 
search limits. You can search a range 
of verses, a single book, a range of 
books, or a group of books. If you 



don't specify a limit, the search will cov- 
er the entire Bible. 

Once you've found your word or 
phrase, QuickVerse allows you to 
write your own comments on that par- 
ticular word or phrase. It's like writing 
in the margins of a printed Bible — a gen- 
uinely handy way to record your 
thoughts as you study. The package of- 
fers a wide range of printing features, 
of course, including the ability to print 
those notes with the text. 

Is QuickVerse really quick? Indeed it 
is, despite what sometimes seems like 
a lot of hard disk accessing. Even on 
a turtle-slow I6-MH2 machine, locating 
a phrase never took more than a few 
seconds — much faster than any text 
search using traditional reference- 
book techniques, as page-weary Sun- 
day school teachers will attest. The re- 
sult: less time spent looking things up 
and much more time to spend looking 
them over. 

What's missing? An autoscrolling fea- 
ture would aid casual reading. Some 
might wish for the Apocrypha, and 
those with a bent toward comparative 
studies might wish the text windows 
were side by side instead of stacked 
two over two. But for many pastors, Sun- 
day school teachers, and other stu- 
dents of the Bible, QuickVerse 2.0 may 
take Bible study to a more comfortable 
level. 

STEVE HUDSON • 

IBM PC and compatibles, 512K RAM, two floppy 
drives or a hard drive, 2.5MB per translation in- 
stalled— S69, Hebrew and Greek Transliterated Bi- 
ble (requires 4.5MB)— S39, additional Bible trans- 
lations— S39 each 

PARSONS TECHNOLOGY 

One Parsons Dr. 

Hiawatha, tA 52233-0100 

(800) 223-6925 

Circle Reader Service Number 359 

DESTINATION: MARSI 

Get ready for blastoff! The compelling 
graphics of Destination: Mars!, an ad- 
venture game that aims to educate as 
well as entertain, will draw you into its 
story before you know it. Early in the 
twenty-first century — only a few years 
from now — you find yourself working 
for a company competing for mineral 
rights to Mars. 

Each time you load the game, you're 
assigned a mission. Early missions con- 
sist of low orbits and space-station du- 
ties. You might be called on to analyze 
data or perform experiments, and cri- 
ses which test your judgment often oc- 
cur. After completing a number of mis- 
sions, you're selected for a flight to 
[vlars. Many emergencies crop up, but 
finally you land on Mars and explore 
the planet. As you travel in your Mars 



[wi 

W ordPerfe ct^ 

Video s Tfeach it Fast 

Po werful Skills -2 H ours or Less 

Just Relax and Watch TV 

SEE it happen , . , Step-by-step. Later, at 
your computer, press the same keys you 
saw m the video (the keys are listed on a 
printed sheet); and powerful new computer 
skills will be at your command. 

It's Easy! 
Thousands of satisfied customers. Used in 
universities, businesses, and government 
agencies across the country. 

Clear Examples - Plain Language 
Our video training has been recommended 
for purchase by The American Library 
Association 's BOOKLIST magazine. 
Five training VIDEOS now available: 



WordPerfect Intermediate 

(Two Hours) S69.95 + S4 Shippine 
Most features are covered - from margins 
to graphics. Includes expanded section on 
LABELS. A single feature can save 
hundreds of hours of labor. 

FOR 5.1 AND S,0 (one video carers bolkj 



Introduction to WordPerfect 

(34 Minutes) $49.95 + S4 Shipping 

For Beginners ... The Basics In A Hurry 

Concise. For people with absolutely no 
computer experience (and no lime to 
study). Gets the first-time user up and 
running . . . immediately! 

FOR 4.2, 5.D AND 5.1 (aiu; video ca vers ail Ihree) 



DOS'«Lotus'»Windows 



Lotus'" Intermediate 



•*^i 



(Two Hours) $69.95 + $4 Shipping 



% 



Zero or limited Lotus experience? Learn 
skills in a hurry! Includes Graphs, 
fVlacros, Linking, @ Functions, etc. 

FOR M VL'rsioniL 2.0 and lalcr luni' video lovvn alii 



DOS* Intermediate 4^ 

(60 !Vlinutes) S69.95 + S4 shipping *? 

New users and "old hands" will learn new 
tricks from this award-winning video. 

FOR all veniun^ of DOS (one \idea coven all} 



%, 



Windows® -H 

(60 Minutes) S69.95 t- $4 Shipping 

Basic and Intermediate Skills, Icons, 
Menus, Dialog Boxes, Clipboard, 
Documents, and much more. 



R ush! • 3 Day Deli very - Add S5 lo AlKive Total 
Send Check or Purchase Order to.' 
Video Projects, Dept. W8y^ 
P.O. Box 218 <^^ 
Salt Lake City, UT 84110^ 



VISA/MC Calf 1-800- 882-8600 

Orders Only (24 Hours) • Questions? B01 -595-1246 



30 Day Money Bacl{ Guarantee 



JULY 1992 COMPUTE 111 



REVIEWS 



rover you complete experi- 
ments, carry out activities at 
several bases, and finally 
match wits against your com- 
petitors as you race to find 
their secret resource areas. 

Many of the tasks you 
have to accomplish are fun, 
and it's a thrill when you final- 
ly get to Mars after many mis- 
sions. VanDam Publishers' 
Mars Atlas, vi^hich comes 
with the program, is an infor- 
mative resource with great 
maps. Compu-Teach's own 
user's manual contains de- 
tailed instructions on pro- 
gram operation and lots of in- 
formation about astronomy, 
biology, chemistry, geology, 
and physics. 

Although some of the chal- 
lenges will be satisfying to 
complete, parts of the pro- 
gram are really annoying. 
For example, to finish each 
experiment, you're given a 
multiple-choice question. As- 
suming you're able to figure 
out the question itself, you 
should be all right. If you 
choose incorrectly, the pro- 
gram responds with Wrong! 
and jumps you right into an- 
other situation. 1 was left in 
the dark many times. Why 
couldn't the program have 
said Let's look at this prob- 
lem again or You should 
have chosen . . , ? I ended 
up learning absolutely noth- 
ing from my mistakes. 

You'll need your good 
judgment to survive emergen- 
cy situations which come 
about as you navigate 
through the game. Although 
1 normally trust mine, I was of- 
ten frustrated when choos- 
ing what I thought to be the 
best solution, only to have 
the computer respond with 
Wrong! A crew member com- 
pensated — or something to 
that effect. I'm still puzzled 
as to why some of my an- 
swers were wrong. I also 
doubt the educational — and 
moral — soundness of a pro- 

112 COMPUTE JULY 1992 




In many ways Destination: Mars! is a great adventure game, but 
some of its educational aspects leave a lot to be desired. 

gram that (1) ignores such 
an opportunity to build re- 
search skills and promote 
good planning, (2) gives on- 
ly negative feedback and 
doesn't explain why your re- 
sponse isn't good, and (3) 
glosses over your mistakes 
by implying that they're OK 
because someone else will 
cover for you. 

My other beefs are relative- 
ly minor. I think it's overly op- 
timistic to recommend the 
age level as 11-17, consid- 
ering some of the chemistry 
and physics problems you 
have to swim through. Young- 
er players may find them- 
selves over their heads. Al- 
so, although the user's man- 
ual attempts to bring each 
scene in the game to life by 
including details about your 
living conditions, computer 
equipment, and fellow travel- 
ers, it would be more effec- 
tive if this were put right in- 



to the program. Even the 
most studious kids are like- 
ly to skip over the manual 
and miss all these special 
touches. 

The program's technical 
operation is perfect, the 
graphics are great, and the 
supplemental materials are 
thorough. I give these areas 
the highest rating, However, 
while Destination: Mars! 
may be built on a sound 
premise, there's a lot of 
room for improvement be- 
fore this program can truly 
be called educational. 

KRISTEN STERNBERG 



IBM PC and compatibles; SS-IK 
RAM; CGA. EGA, or VGA; Sound 
Blaster-compatible— $59. 95 

COMPU-TEACH EDUCATIONAL 

SOFTWARE 

78 Olive St. 

New Haven. CT 06511 

(800) 44-TEACH 

Circle Reader Service Number 370 



SOUND MASTER II 

Settling for the Internal speak- 
er that comes in your comput- 
er makes about as much 
sense as settling for an AM 
radio in a new car. Both get 
the job done up to a point, 
but by settling for them, 
you're missing out on a lot. 
Besides, like an AM radio in 
a car, a computer's internal 
speaker sounds terrible. 

So you decide to up- 
grade. But which custom 
sound system will you 
choose for your computer? 
AdLib? Sound Blaster? 
Well, how about a sound 
card that covers those bas- 
es and more at a list price on- 
ly slightly higher than its com- 
petitors? The Covox Sound 
Master II emulates the most 
popular sound cards and of- 
fers several other worthwhile 
features. It comes pack- 
aged with hardware and soft- 
ware that allows you to chan- 
nel your internal speaker's 
sounds through the sound 
card, issue voice com- 
mands, and link your MIDI 
keyboard directly to the card 
for compositional interaction. 

All of these features won't 
appeal to everyone, of 
course, and not all are acces- 
sible to everyone. For in- 
stance, you have to have an 
80386 or higher processor 
to take advantage of both 
the Sound Blaster compatibil- 
ity and the SMulator technol- 
ogy, which makes Sound 
Master II work with software 
that requires other sound 
cards. Beyond such [imita- 
tions, though, lies dramatic 
sound improvement. 

Simply running the inter- 
nal speaker through the 
Sound Master II smooths 
out a lot of aggravating 
squawks and bleats, The dra- 
matic difference comes with 
games and other sound-in- 
tensive software. Once 
plugged into an expansion 



Advertisers Index 



Reader Service Number/Advertiser 



Page Reader Service Number/Advertiser 



Page Reader Service Number/Advertiser 



162 8-BJt G-15 

254 64 Disk Connedion G-1S 

217 9O0 Software 116 

140 Abracadata 21 

248 Arademic Guidance Services 122 

232 Accolade 37 

146 Accolade 68,89 

119 Accolade 77 

IBS Accurals Technologies 121 

134 Aclive Daia 122 

AlCS 119 

240 Amperor USA 118 

155 Antigrav Toolkit G-17 

239 ATOP A-25 

191 Bare Bones Soflware A-25 

260 Best Personalized Books 121 

173 Blue Valley Sollware 119 

255 Ca[ol(e Induslries G-17 

241 CanCor A-23 

218 Cedar Sotiware 123 

149 Chips & Bils 83 

166 Citizen American Corp 9 

187 ComPro Sotiware Syslems 122 

150 Compsull 121 

181 Compsull G-21 

103 CompuServe 17 

Compuler Business Services 125 

141 Computer Produclions 124 

23D CovDx 116 

137 Covox 117 

125 Creative Labs 3 

DCS Induslries 107 

151 Delphi Online 31 

Delphi Noetic Systems, Inc A-15 

131 Demo Source 120 

250 Diet Guidance International ... 124 

190 Diskoveries G-17 

135 Diskoveries 122 

253 Disks O'Pienly G-17 

208 Disk-Count Sollware 118 

229 D&G Infosystems Inc 123 

176 OSK Enterpiises 121 

124 Electronic A-ls 35 

198 EMS Prolessional Shareware 119 

215 ESI A-25.A-27 

202 European Import Software A-25 

111 Fairbroihers A-21 

FGM Connection G-21 

207 Finetaslic Computers A-13 

142 Free Spirit Software 118 

115 GardenTech 12^ 

GM OldsmohilB 11 

252 Gordon & Associates 124 

145 Grapevine Group G-19 



251 Guy Spy 79 

236 Heme Data Systems - 123 

203 Huntley Enterprises 124 

123 HyperData A-27 

21B ICD A-3 

117 Impulse A-7 

127 Induclive Logic 125 

160 IPD 124 

107 Isak Computer Marfreting 124 

Jack OTioses G-17 

JP PBM Products by Ivlail G-19 

233 Karen Crowther 118 

223 KodeKrakr Ltd G-17 

132 Konami 43 

234 tvlahoney Sottware Products A-27 

222 tvlahoney Sottware Products 122 

211 IVlegagelVI A-27 

247 Ivleggido Enterprises A-13 

180 (vlicfografx IFC.l 

IvIiCfoLogic 47 

197 IvIicroMagic Productions 123 

139 MicroMiga A-15 

224 MIcroProse 91 

225 MicroProsc 45 

212 MIcroProse 59 

175 Microsphere A-9 

174 Mission Control 25 

210 My Story Books, Inc 121 

national Discount Computer 120 

National VideoTex Network 27 

Needham's Electronics 120 

153 New World Computing 67 

246 Nordic Track 114 

192 Origin IBC 

152 Pankhurst Programming G-17 

243 Parsons Technology 13 

106 Parth Galen A-23 

196 PC Comix Inc 96 

PC CompoNel Inc 125 

169 Pixel Perfect, Inc 41 

227 Play it Again 123 

185 Poor Person Software A-21 

151 Piofessiona! Cassette 115 

193 Professional Cassette .101 

182 Professor Jones Inc 120 

Pure Entertainment 40 

Duality Innovations. Inc 125 

168 Ramco Compuler Supplies 121 

205 Rio Computers G-7 

220 RoKiool Sottware A-13 

143 SafeSott Systems Inc 122 

112 School ot Computer Training 124 

SearctiStakes 5 

116 SeXXy Software 125 



154 Sierra OnLine BC 

244 Sieira OnLine , .' 95 

109 Smart Luck Sottware 122 

126 Sottshoppe Inc 119 

138 Software of the Mohlh Club A-23 

121 Software of the Month Club 119 

SOGWAP Software A-13 

SOGWAP Sollware G-19 

108 Spectrum Holobyle 39 

113 Star Micronics 15 

130 Starware Publishing Corp 122 

221 Superior Micro Systems G-19 

204 Technology Link, Inc .125 

170 Tenei S-3 

148 Terrapin Softvare Inc G-15 

118 The Amish Outlaw Shareware 122 

147 Thruslmasler 117 

200 TriTech Sottware, Inc 124 

195 Universal Memory 23 

Video Projects ill 

20B Vidia A-25 

158 Virgin Games 97,98.99 

183 Viigin Games 53 

167 Viigin Games 51 

242 Virtual Reality Labs A-11 

159 VMC Software A-25 

171 VMC Software G-19 

172 Wedgwood Computer 119 

226 Wild Duck 117 

110 Zephyr Services 122 

114 Zero's and One's ! . . 109 

228 ZipperWare A-25 



Amiga Resource Disk - , - A-15 

Amiga Resource/GEnie OnLine A-4 

COMPUTE'S Best PC Games 57 

COMPUTE'S Best Ulilities A-27 

COMPUTE Books , 66.85.96.103.A-15,A-20^22,1 10,125 

COMPUTE/GEnie OnLine 55 

COMPUTE Productivity Managei 29 

COMPUTE/Quanlum Q-Link G-9 

Gazette Disk Library G-13 

Gazette Disk Subscription G-15 

Gazette Disk Index . G-16 

Productivity Manager G-23 

Sharepalf Disk Subscription 60 

Single PC Disk Order 50 

Specialty Disks G-11 



CREDITS 



Cover: Pete Turner; page 4: Masahiro Sano/ 
Stock Market; pages 6-7: Phil Jason/Tony Stone 
Worldwide; page 16: Ken Call/Image Bank; 
page 62: Charly Franklin/FPG International; pag- 
es 68-69: Mark Wagoner; page 71 : Charly Fran- 
klin/FPG International; page 78: Jook Leung/ 
FPG International; pages 80-81; Mark Wagoner; 
page 82: Andy Zito/lmage Bank; pages 86-87: 
Mark Wagoner; pages 92-93: Peter A. Simon/ 
Stock Market; page A-5: H. R. Uthoff/lmage 
Bank; page A-8: Don Myers; page A-32: Masa- 
hiro Sano/Stock Market; pages G-4-5: Steven 
Hunt/Image Bank. 



Put Our List 
On Your List 

Our list can tielp you do ttie 
ottier things you tiave on 
your 1131. Such as buy a car. . 
esllmate social security. . . 
Stan ttie diet. . . check out 
investmenls. . . 

Our lisi is the Consumer 
Intormation Catalog. It's free and 
lists more than 200 free and low- 
cost govemmenl booklets on 
employment, hsalttt, salary, 
nutrition, housing. Federal 
benefits, and tors of ways you 
can save money 

So to shorten youf list, send (or ttte free Consumer Mormatlon Catalog. 
It's the thing to do. 

Just send us your name and address. Write: 

Conium«r InforntatJon Centar 
0>pirtnMn( LL 
Pueblo. Colorado 61009 

A putitic MfViM el Ihia ^Ukatkm 
/i^y^N and ttw Consumef Intoni^tion Csmar 

UC^_%^ ol DM U.S. Owiara] S«vic« Admlntttntion 




JULY 1992 COtvlPUTE 1)3 




While Soloflex® 
owners are still 
payirt" for iheir 
machines, you 
can be enjoying 
a stronger, more 



SOLOFLEX 



attractive body with NordicFlex Gold. Stutiies prove NordicFlex Gold builds your body up to 
40% faster than Soloilcx', plus it costs 1/,1 less! Build your body now with NordicFlex Gold! 



Call today for a 30 day in-home trial! 
And build your superior body with 
the superioV strength trainer,' 



NORDICFLEX 



hv i\'i?rd!cTrack 



riVILIL V ILFE/U brochure l-dUll445-2J6(l Si 

Or write: Nordk'l'nick, Bept, #5K8(;2, 141 .Jonathan Blvd. N., Chiiska, MN 55318 



S 1992 NonJicTrack, Inc.. A CML Qmipany. All righu rL'ser^vil. SoTollox i^ a registered irademart nf .Soliitlcx. Inc. 



Circle Reader Service Number 246 



slot, the card and its pair of blue mini- 
speakers transformed tinkly music and 
ragged jet whooshes (as heard through 
my internal speaker) into a majestic 
wall of sound. Both arcade games like 
Thunderstrike and adventure games 
like The Secret of Monkey Island bene- 
fited greatly from the upgrade. 

And while digitized computer 
speech still leaves a lot to be desired 
compared to the real thing, Sound Mas- 
ter II told me everything I needed to 
hear, both w/hen using its test pro- 
grams and when using software like Su- 
per Solvers Spellbound!. 

But why stop at digitized speech? 
Speak yourself, and tell your computer 
what to do. The software accompany- 
ing the Sound Master II allows you to is- 
sue voice commands to run macros. 
Say, "Give me a directory," and you'll 
get one, or you can use your imagina- 
tion. I issued a James Brown-style 
"Hah!" to start my word processor. 

Sound Master II also comes pack- 
aged with PC-LYRA, a basic music-com- 
position program. In addition, you can re- 
cord sounds to RAM or a hard disk and 
sample at a rate of 100 to 25,000 sam- 
ples per second using the software that 
comes with the card, most of which is rel- 
atively easy to learn and use. 

For all its positive attributes, Sound 




Get the Covox Sound Master 11 and end 
weak internal speaker sound. 

Master II isn't without its Haws. The 
cord for the speakers allows them to 
be placed only about a foot apart, a dis- 
tance I found to be insufficient. Some 
of the software comes without a print- 
ed manual, requiring you to print one 
from a text file. And the printed manu- 
al you do get — a dual edition covering 
both the Sound Master II hardware/ 
software package and the PC-LYRA 
program — is woefully inadequate. It 
has only a few vague illustrations, no 
clear overview of the features availa- 
ble, no index for the Sound Master II 
section, and no troubleshooting 
guide. I found it easier to put the soft- 
ware through its paces using trial and 
error than to plow through the book. 
When a company makes a product 
this good, I wish it would go all the way 



and give it a comparable manual. 

Hardware and software both deliv- 
ered, however, which matters more. 
My irritating internal speaker has now 
been tamed, and Sound Master II has 
opened a window to a broad world ol 
sound. It's an excellent package, wheth- 
er for games and music or for bossing 
your computer around. 

EDDIE HUFFMAN 



IBM PC and compatibles (80286 or faster), 2S6K 
RAM, 8- or 16-bit slot— $229.95 

COVOX 

675 Conger St. 

Eugene, OR 97402 

(503) 342-1271 

Circle Reader Service Number 371 



OPTIONS 



Does the dreaded DOS command line 
interface get you down? Do your typ- 
ing skills give rise to a File Not Found 
response more than you care to admit? 
Do you have difficulty remembering ob- 
scure nested directory paths? Then re- 
place the infamous DOS prompt with 
the Options point-and-click interface. 

Options typically installs in the C 
drive and modifies your AUTOEX- 
EC.BAT file to execute automatically at 
startup. Or you could access the system 
by entenng MENU at the DOS prompt. 
Menu options execute DOS commands, 
launch programs, or run batch files- 

The program features timesaving 
macro capabilities, password protec- 
tion to limit access to designated users 
or particular directories, plus a screen 
saver that blanks the screen after a us- 
er-specified length of time. You also 
get tracking control to keep records ol 
computer usage, a stopwatch function 
for time tracking (great for keeping 
time records on client phone calls), 
and pop-up calendar, calculator, and 
memory map accessories. 

Options automatically loads func- 
tions into extended memory to lessen 
the amount of conventional memory re- 
quired to run it. Pull-down menus in the 
Edit mode and context-sensitive online 
help assist with program operation. Us- 
ers get several convenient features in 
one handy location. Isn't it time you con- 
sidered your options to maximize produc- 
tivity, guarantee system security, and 
minimize operator error? 

CAROL HOl-ZBERG 



IBM PC and compatibles, 384K RAM. hard drive; 
mouse recommended — $89.95 

APOGEE SYSTEMS 
717 630 Eightri Ave- SW 
Calgary, AB 
Canada T2P 1G6 
(403) 265-0675 

Circle Reader Service Number 372 O 



114 



COMPUTE JULY 1992 



Genuine heather 

BaCUTIVE TRAVEL ENSEMBU 

,„Travel in Style -at an incredibly low cost! 




/ntrodl'CING a four-piece Executive Travel Ensemble -made to withstand the 
abuses of today's fast-paced travel -yet attractive enough for even the most dis- 
criminating traveler! 

Made from patchwork cowhide leather, an extremely popular item in Europe, 
the leather exterior of this luggage consists of small, irregular pieces of cowhide 
leather, each carefully hand-sewn into place. Using this method results in this 
luggage's handsome appearance, looking sleek, elegant, and very expensive. 

In addition to the tough, rugged exterior, each piece of luggage also features 
high-quality double-leather rope handles, and adjustable nylon shoulder straps. 
Made to last a lifetime, with double-stitching at aU stress points, these 
leather bags have also been fully lined in water-resistant vinyl, which 
^offers extra protection not usually found in other, more 
expensive luggage. 

Now, you can own your own rich, elegant leather luggage 
for less than you'd expect to pay for most nylon bags! 



Co/o» & Finishes: Also Available: "THE CUPPER 



All Four Pieces Now Pay Just: 




Patchwork 



188 



oo 





This rugged telescoping aluminum luggage 
can can be used to move luggage, computers, 
product samples, trade show equipment-even 
groceries! Advenised niilionally ai $59.95; 
now just ^29^^ 

Pieoie odd $6.00 shipping and handling for corf oniy 



Carry-On Bag: 

This roomy ba^ has built-in 
stabilizer straps, to keep items 
pressed and ready-to-wear! A 
versati le bn^ for all-around use- 
fulness; easy cci' carr>' and small 
enough fur weekend outings. 
Mca-iurts24" w x 18** h x 6'* d 

DisHncHve 

Garment Bag: 

Roomy thfL-e-suii capacity gar- 
ment bug, with interior stabi- 
lizer strap and hanf^ers keeps 
suits fresh , Outer pocket keeps 
contenis safe, clrj' and orga- 
nized- Qjnvtnient shoulder 
strap for ease of carrying. Mea- 
sures4 2 " h x 23" w x 3"d (hang- 
ing) 



Travel Flight Bag: 

Tough nylon zippers. keep both 
compartments secureiy closed 
with double leather handle and 
adjustable nylun shouider 
straps. 'I'his bag can duuble as 
your leather spurt bag. with 
protective waier-rqsisiant vi- 
nyl lining. Measures 19" w x 
12"hx8"d 

Trove/ Utitity Case: 

This .surprisingly clever, func 
lional design will store all you 
ncetl idt'arr)' in the rtHjmy zip- 
top Utilitj' Kit. Waterpritijf- 
lined wi th interior pocket adds 
usefulness and glamour to 
whai might otherwise be a 
commonplace accessory. Mea- 
sures I 2" w X 7" h X -4" d 



I Ordering Information 

I Nome or Institution Name 

I Address 



Slate 



.^P. 



I Credit Cord Number 

I 
I 



Exp, Date . 



ToA Ftw 24 Hows: Credit Cant 

(800) BS2-8346 



Or, you may Fax your Drdbr to.' 

(818)896-0272 



Signotvre 

I I Visa I I MasterCard \ I American Express 

Color Choice: Finish Choice: 

O Rich Brown \_\ Executive Btatk LJ Ostrich LJ Patchwork 



Need it Tomorrow? Ask operator for 

Express Service, Caiifomta residents, 

pUtase add 8 '/*% state sales tax. 

fHeose odd $ U.OO per set 

shipping and handling 



Circle Header Service Number 151 



I 
I 

■ Luggage Cart: D 

I 
I 
I 




r^^^ 



BO 



Business Class, Inc. 

Suite 4, Depf. CPF 

408 S. Pasadena Avenue Pasadena, CA 91105 




EASY ACCESS TO OVER 50,000 OF THE HOTTEST THIES 

»00 Software, mc. 

Presents Shareware Sc 
Public Domain 

Thot you can hove INSTANTLY 
using your 1 200 tsr 240O Baud modem 

FOR ALL IBM COMPATlBlf PC's 
No Disk Fees * Tested Virus Free 

Call Now & Get it Now! Avoid Tlie Moil Order Mess & Risk 
No need to order ond wait, downlood and use it now. 
SHAREWARE, the "Try Before You Buy" 
concept is brought to you instantly. Most titles 
TRT tlS FOB '^^^"''^"^ '" ^ minutes or less (2400 Baud Modem) 

FREE! 

C714) S8B-8707- 



EPROM PROGRAMMERS 



Stand-Alone Gang Programmer 



View & Download Catalogue Se Shareware 
Program Of The Month - (714) 289-8707 



8 ZIF Sockets fof Fssi Gang 
Programming and Easy 

Split If no 




20 Key Ke/pad 



20 X A Une LCD Display 



TOP NAME SOFTWARE FROM CATAGORIES INCLUDING: 



• business 

• Desk Top Pubfiihing 

• Educotion 

• Games 

• CJiildren'i Programj 



• Programming 

• Power Users 

• Special Interesf 

• Windows 3.0 

• Desic Top Organizers 



• Ulililies 

• Graphics 

• G>mmunicaHons 

• Reference 

• Computer Aided Design (CAD) 



Intemal Programmer for PC 



• Conlolelelv sIa^d■alo^e or PC-driven 
•Pr-;:l;jriti[l=^01.1; 

• 1 Megabll gl DRAM 

• User upgradable la 32 MegaUl 

■ .3/.6" riF Sockets, ns-m, 

Paralial In and Out 

• 32K mlernal Rash H^ROM for easy 
tilmwate upgrades 

• Quick Pulse Atgorilliin I27Z5B 
msjeciMmuttint/seci 

• 2 year v;arranty 

■ Made in the U.S A 
■Tt'chnica! supoon by phane 

• Complela manual and schemaiic 

■ Single Sockel Pnignmmer alsn 
atallaUe. iSWM 

•Spin and Shuffle 16 & 32 bii 

• 100 User Definable Wacros. 10 User 
DelrnaSle Configurations 

• Inteliigenl Idenlitier 

• Bmafv. Iniel Hex, and Motorals 5 
•2716 10 4 Megabit 

imrna 



CALL NOWi AVAILABLE 24 HOimS 

1 -900-RUN-SOFTWARE 

1-900-786-7638 • Set Modem to N,8,l 

98c/min. - $2.50 1st minute 

Porentol Consent Required Under I 8 Veers Of Age 

Use Your Modem To Select From A Menu of Over 50,000 Titles 

Drganized For Easy Selection By Even Inexperienced Modem Users" 

Welcome Authors, Moil Us Your Software 

Shareware Prooroms Reouire Poymenr To Author If Found Useful 



900 Software, Inc. Voice Line (714)289-0287 

^64? E Chapman. Suite #285 • Orongr;. CA 9266V 



Circle Reader Service Numlwr 217 



fieiv Intelligent Averaging Algorithm. Programs 64A in 10 sec. 256 in 1 min , 1 Meg (27010, 011) 
in 2 min. 45 sec. 2 Meg (27C20fl1 ) in 5 min. Inlernal card with external 40 pin ZIF. 



• Heads. Verities, and programs 2716. 32, 32A. 
64.54A. 128. 128A256 5t2 513 010.011,301 
27C2001. MCM 68764, 2532. -1 MegaDiis 

• Automatleili) jtlt prttrantniliig idllago 

• Load and sava hulter to disk 

• Binary. Idiel Hen. and Motorola S formats 

• No petsonallly modules required 

• 1 Year v/arratity 

• 1 days money back guarantee 

• Adapters available lor 8748. 49. 51 , 751 . 52. 
55, n« 7712, 27210, 57C1024, and memoiy 
cards 

• Made in U.S.A 



40 pin ZIF 




EMPDEMO EXE available BBS (916) 972-B042 



NEEDtfAM'S ELECTRONICS 

■1539 Orange Grov6 Ave •Sacramflnio.CA95BJi ^^ 

jMoiday-Friday. 3am-5pni PST] COD OS^Sm 



Call for nore irlarmation 

(916)924-8037 

FAX (9161 972.3960 



Circle Reader Service Numlwr 199 





COMPUTE'S Product Mart 

is a special advertising section designed to benefit you, the PC direct marketer, 
by letting you advertise directly to the readers that buy. We offer: 






• Marketing Assistance -Guaranteed Audience 

Each ad receives a complementary Our rate base is guaranteed at 
reader service number that generates 275,000 per issue, with an actual 
a targeted sales lead mailing list. monthly circulation of over 300,000. 

• Qualified Readers •Cost Effectiveness 

Our readers search the Product Mart Ad sizes range from Va (2V8 x 3) to 
for quality hardware, software, and ^/a page, and you can request fre- 
peripheral products they can buy, quency rates of up to 12 times per year 

BA/V, 2/color and 4/color availability. 








Space closing: The 15th of the third month preceding issue date (e.g. May issue 
closes February 15th). Space linnited to a first-reserved, first-served basis. 








For ad specifications or more information call 

Lucille Dennis 

Telephone (707) 451-8209 • Fax (707) 451-4269 








Caff now to reserve your space! 







Look Left 

FlRE MlSSLES 

Fire Guns 

Select Missies 
Radar on/off 



Look Up 

Look Center 
Look Right 

Look Back 



ThrustMaster inc. 

10150 S.W. Nimbus Ave Ste E-7 
Tigard, Oregon 97223 

(503) 639-3200 23 M 
1 Dealer Inquiries Welcome 




Compatible With All 
Flight Simulator Packages 
AS A Two Button Joystick. 





Standard Game Port Interface. 
Flight Control System ^ 



circle Reader Service Number 147 



SOUND MASTER® II 

THE MOST COMPATIBLE PC-AUDIO CARD IN THE WORLD 




• 100% AdLib"" compatible. 11 Voice 
FM Music Synthesizer. 

« Exclusive SMULATOR'" sound file 
conversion software. Operates "SDund 
Blaster' compatible titles - WITH 
IMPROVED SOUND QUALITY! 

• VOICE COMMAND SOFTWARE. 

• Covox Voice Master , Speech Thlng'^, 
MIDI Maeslro" compatible. 

• e bit DMA sound digliizer. Sample 
rates to 25Kb^Gs/sec with "direct to 
dIsK' recording and playback option. 

• MtDI interface with simultaneous input 
and autpuL Includes PC-LYRA"' music 
composition software . 

• 4 -watt (pcaic) audio amplifier with 
adjustable volume control. 



• internal PC &pea)<er supported, 
improves sound from any sotlwaro 
using the PC's Internal speaker. 

« Audiophile sound quality. Low noise, 
precision engineered electronics. 

• Extensive software tools and support, 
inctuding digital audio compression 
and editing utilities. 

• Supported by the largest library of 
software titEes In entertainment, 
business, music, and education. 

• Dual 3-Inch speakers, 6 foot MIDI 
cabig, and Intornal speaker bypass 
connector included. 

• Made in USA by Covox -THE 
microcomputer audio speiclailsl s^nce 
1975. 



Your Best Choice for Multi-Media Sound 

ONLVS229.95 (plu.sSS sliippingS; hundlin};) 

ORDER HOTLINE: (503) 342-1271 M-F Q AM TO 5 PM PST. VISA, MC, 
AMEX phone or FAX orders accepted. NO CODs. 30 day money back 
guarantee if not satisfied. One year warranty on hardware. 

TRADE-UP OFFER: Your current PC sound card brand is worth SSS 
toward the purchase of a Sound Master II. Contact Covox for details. 

CALL OR WRITE FOR FREE PRODUCT CATALOG 

covox Inc. 675 Conger Slreet • Eugene, OR mo2 

^ Phone (503) 342-1271 • FAX 503-342-1 2B3 ^ 



Circle Reader Service Number 137 



We didn't write this ad. 

(Our critics did) 

'Fantavision is a highly motivating, sophisticated graphics tool with 
wfiich users create and view animated graphics ... an outstanding 
environment for teaching and experimenting with graphics and 
animation.' - School Library Journal 

"You won't believe how easy it is to create artistically complex animation 
with Fantavision. Through this unique programming achievement, your 
series of single, still pictures are seamlessly sewn together into an 
animated movie.' - Cathy Franit, Family Computing 

"Fantavision is one incredible package. It's the simplest animation 
program I've ever used, yet it is so well designed that complex concepts 
are within easy reach."- Terry Johnston, Incider 

"It is a shame that no article appearing In print can do justice to 
Fantavision. You have to see it to believe just how easy animation can 
be." - Andrew Wolf, Computer Livir^g 



FANTAVISION 



1 SPEfr^i VftCti QE»€n»10S 



H 






S59.95atyour 
Retailer's 

Wild Duck 

979 Golf Course Dr, Suite 256F 
Rohnert Parte, CA 94928 

(707) 586-0728 



e>f SCOTT AHOEWO*. 




arcle Reader SefVtce Number 226 



/ 



la 



DISK-COUNT SOFTWARE 



Orders Only: 

800-448-6658 

Product Info & other Business: 
908-541-876B 



Lowest DelivBred Price with shipping I 



We will beat any advertised price.' 



4-D Boxing 3T 

ABPA Baseball 2 5 
Aces of Pacific 4 2 
A(fv. of Willy Beami$h3 7 
Alge Blaster Plus 3f 
Algebra Made Easy 2 5 
Barbie PC 2 6 

Bart Simpson 3f 

Batllechess (all ver,)31 
Battle Isle 32 

Berenstain Bear Letters 2 5 
Casino Pack 1 3 2 
Castle of Dr. Brain 31 
Caslles 37 

ChallBnga Ancient Emp31 
Ctiessmaster 3000 32 
Cfiildren Writ, i Publ. 42 
Ctruck Yeager Combat 38 
Civilization 39 

Compl. lotlery Tracker 31 
Conquest of Long Bow42 
Crossword Magic 4.0 32 
Crusaders Dark Savanl42 
Dagger ol Amon Ra 42 
Darlilands 39 

Deluxe Paint II Ent>anc.88 
Designasaurus II 25 
Dragons Lair II 37 

Dr. Quandary 37 

Ducklales:Ouest Goldl 5 
Dusk oi ttre Gods 38 
Earl Weaver It 32 

Eco Quest 37 

Elvira 2: Jaw/Cerberus 42 
Eye of Beliolder 2 38 
£ Z Cosmos 42 

F-117a Stealth figti!er4 9 
Falcon 3.0 47 

Family Tree Maker 2.042 
Fligtit Simulator 41 
Calif, or West. Eur. 23 
Scenery Set A or B 37 
Sound ( Griptiics Enh, 25 
Free DC 37 

Global Conquest 3 7 
Godfatlier 32 

Gunship 2000 4 2 

Headline Harry Paper3 7 
Hoyles Book Games 3 31 
Indiana Jones 4 38 
Jack Nicklas Signature 4 2 
J. Nickiaus Course Disk 1 4 
Kid Pix 3 7 

Kid Works 31 

Kings Quest V 4 2 
Laffer Utilities 2 2 

Uisur Suit Larry Bundle 42 
Leisure Suit Larry 5 42 
Lemmings 31 

Las Hanley 2: Lost L.A. 3 7 
Ll^e and Death 2 3 2 
Linl(s 36 

Links - Course disk 1 6 
Lord of the Rings 2 37 
Lost Admiral 38 

Lost Treasures lntoi;om42 
Magic Candle 2 38 
Martian Memorandum37 
Math Blaster Mystery 31 
Matti Blaster Plus 31 
Matt) Rabbit 25 

Matrix Cubed 32 

McGee at the Fun Fair 25 
Mega Fortress 38 

UetroGnomes' Music 31 
Mickey's ABC or 123 25 
Mickey's ABC Combo37 
Micro Cookbook 31 
Microleaaue 4 Baseb4 2 
Midnight Rescue 31 
Migtit k Magic 3 38 
Mike Oilka Toolball 37 
Milliken Storyteller 32 
Mixed up Fairy Tale31 
Mutanoid Math China 31 
Nigel's World 3 2 

Ninja Turtle Advent.3 1 
Ninja Turtle Action 2 5 
Number Muncher 3 
Omar Stiariff Bridges? 



SHIPPING IS JUST $4,00 PER OHDERI MOT PER ITEM. 



One A Day (eacti) 1 5 
Operation tJeptune3 7 
Orbits 37 

Oregon Trail 3 

Once Upon a Time (ea.)3 1 
Outnumbered 31 

Overlord 30 

Paperboy 2 2 7 

P C Globe 3 9 

P C USA 31 

P C Study Bible 90 

PGA Golf 32 

Playroom w/ Sound 31 
Police Quest 3 4 2 

Print Shop 36 

Print Shop Companion 3 1 
Print Shop Graphic {ea.)22 
Random House Encycl. 69 
Reader Rabbit 1 31 
Reader Rabbit 2 37 
Red Baron 42 

Rocketeer 31 

Romance of 3 Kings 2 42 
Rules ol Engagement 38 
Sea Rogue 31 

Secret Monkey Island 2 38 
Secret Weapon Luflwafl44 
Mission bisk (each) 20 
Sesame Street Tri-Packl 9 
Shuttle 36 

Sim Ant 37 

Sim City 30 

Sim Earth DOS or Wind41 
Space Ace 1 or 2 37 
Space Ace Bundle 42 
Space Quest IV 42 
Spellbound 31 

Spell- it Plus 3 1 

Star Trek 2Sth Aniv. 37 
Slickybear Malh Tutor 30 
Stickybear PrB-School30 
Stickybear Read. Tutors 
StripPoker 3 32 

Data Disk 1 to 5 (ea) 1 7 
Super Munctiers 3 
Tank 37 

Tony LaRussa Baseball3 2 
Treasure Mountain 31 
Treehouse 37 

Trump Castle 11 31 

Twiliglit 2000 3 7 

Ultima Trilogy 2 4 9 
Ultima Underworld 4 7 
Ultima VII 4 7 

Ullrabots 37 

U.M.S. Planet Editor 3 7 
U.S. or World Atlas 3 6 
Warlords 32 

Wayne Gretzky II 35 
What's My Angle 31 
Where is Carman 
in USA 31 

in America's Past 36 
in Europe 31 

in Time 31 

in World (DeLuxe}49 
Wild Wheels 32 

Wing Commander 114 9 
Windows Entert. Pak29 
Word Muncher 30 
World Atlas 38 

World Class Soccer 26 
Writer Rabbit 31 

Wrath o( Demon 31 
Your Personal Train SAT31 

Batllechess " 49 

Beethoven's Ninth 59 
Carmen World Deluxe 69 
Coral Draw 429 

Family Doctor 59 

Game Collection 51 
Gunship / Mid Winter 6 2 
Ml Tank Platoon 6 2 
Private Pic! (Adolt Only)6 9 
Railroad Tycoon 6 2 
Sherlock Holmes Consul4 2 
Where is Carman Delx 6 9 
Wing Com. / Llllima VI 6 9 



BUSItJESS & UTILITY I SOUND CARDS 



386 Max 6 5 

Above Utilities 51 

Adobe Type Managers 1 
After Daik Window 2.0 29 
Ami Pro 2.0 265 

Ami Pro 2.0 Upgrade 82 
Auto Map 49 

Autontenu 35 

Bannermania 22 

Calendar Creator + 4.0 49 
Carbon Copy 1 1 4 
Carloon Calendar a Day19 
Cash Biz 31 

Central Point Ami Virus BS 
Certificate Maker 26 
Check-itI 80 

Clarion Personal Devel. 49 
Colorix 95 

Copy II PC 35 

Corel Draw 2,0 349 
Correcl GrammarAVInd. 62 
DacEasy AccounlingBS 
Data Se! Gold 79 

Definitions Plus BO 

Desqview 2.4 7 9 

Desqview 386 v6.0 124 
D R DOS 6.0 69 

Dvorak on Typing 3 i 
Eight in One 36 

Express Publisher 9 5 
Facelift 6 5 

Far Side Calendar 4 9 
Form Tool Gold 5 7 

Geoworks Pro 119 

Grammallk 5 or Win. 5 7 
Harvard Graphics 3.0 375 
Hijaak 99 

Icon Do It 2 2 

Into Select 8 5 

Label Pro Laser or Dol4 7 
Labels Unlimited 3.0 5 9 
Laplink tV Pro 115 

Lotus 1-2-3 v2.3 319 
Lotus Works 8 4 

Math Type 155 

U. Soft CJuik Basic or C6 5 
MS DOS 5.0 4 7 

MS DOS 5.0 Upgrade 5 5 
Norton Antivirus 85 
Norton Utilities 6.01 115 
Pacioli 2000 31 

Pagemat(er 4.0 470 
PC Anywhere IV 115 
P C Kwik Powerpak 75 
PC Paintbrush IVV 114 
P C Tools 7.1 lis 

PES: First Choice 75 
PES: Firs! Publisher 75 
PFSr Publisher 75 

PES: Widow Works 105 
PES: Write 75 

Procomm Ptus 2.0 69 
Publish Itl 2.0 95 

Pyro Screen Saver 35 
QDOS 3 4 6 

QEMH 6.0 59 

ORAM 49 

Quick Books 8 5 

Quicken 5.0 4 5 

Quicken Quick Pay 3 9 
Sit Back DOS or Wind 5 9 
Slacker 89 

Slacker w/ 16 bit card 179 
Windows 3,1 9 

Windows 3,1 Upgrades 5 
Winfax Pro 7 4 

Winrix 235 

Wired for Sound 2 7 
Word Perfect 5,1 249 



Dust Covers 

Keyboard 1 2 

CPU & Mont, or Print. 1 5 
Grounded Wrist Pads 9 
Keyboard Skin 

(FCC number required]! 5 
Static Pad ■ System 15 
Stax (Repels Dusl) 5 



M Lib 7 9 

Ad Lib MicroChannel 1 39 
Ad Lib Gold 1000 185 
Ad Lib Gold 2000 269 
ATI Stereo F/X 139 
Sound Blaster 109 

Sound Blaster MCA21S 
Sound Blaster Pro 189 
Sound Master II 145 
Pro Audio Plus 189 
Pro Audio 16 229 

Pro Audio 16 kiulimedis 
Upgrade Kit 7 39 

Tnundarboard 95 

Roland SCC-1 395 

Shielded Speakers 2 5 



MIDI INTERFACE 



Cakewalk Apprentice145 
MIdiator 101 9 5 

Music Ouesi Midi Card7£ 
MQX-32 189 

Roland MPU-JPC 135 
Roland MPU-tMC 245 
The Miracle 349 

Piano Works 9 5 



MIDI SOFTWAP 


1= 


Band in a Box 


59 


Cadenza 


129 


Cakewalk 


9 5 


Cakewalk Pro 


169 


Copyist App, 2.0 


95 


Encore 


3/9 


Master Tracks Pro 


249 


Music Printer Plus 


419 


Music Time 


169 


Play it by Ear 


69 


Romeo 


Vh 


Songwrite 5 


65 


Trax for Windows 


60 



JOYSTICKS 



CH Flightstick 4 4 

CH Mach Hi 3 2 

CH Game Card 111 Auto 31 
Eliminalor 33MHz Card 2 8 
Gravis Joystick 3 5 
Kraft KC3 18 

Kraft Thunderstick 28 
Maxx Flight Yoke 69 
Maxx Flight Pedal 39 
Quickshot Aviator 33 
Quickshot Intruder 30 
Quickshot Warrior 1 8 
Thrustmaster 69 

Thruslmasler Weapons 79 



MIMJ*JJJri!<;HIO 



Appoint Mouse Pro(,Pen7C 
CH Roller Mouse lserial)8 5 
Expert Mouse Serial 9 5 
Microsolt Bus Mouse 1 1 5 
Microsoft Serial Mouse 9 5 
Mouseman Cordless13£ 
Mouseman Serial 6 9 
Trackman Serial 7 9 



MODEMS & FAX 



Frecom Fax 96 1 39 
Frecom 96 One-Liner 1 85 
MaxFax 9624 9 9 

MaxLite Ext, Fax/Mod,1Sg 
PM 2400 Internal 129 
Sportster 2400 lnter.12£ 
Sportster 2400 Exler. 149 
Zoom External 2400 69 
Zoom Internal 2400 7 9 



^IIIIIIIH 

Complete 1/2 Pg Scan.lBS 
Complete Hand Scan 155 
Microtek 600G 829 
Mouse Sys.Pagebfush 165 
Scanman 32 160 

Scanman 256 265 
Scanman 256 W/OCR329 
Scanman 256 MCA349 



Uisu Cini, Mm, Oiscovw, ind Aimricjn Eiprau anil iccepttd, No >i;rcii«g9 on CfSdit aiii. Ho C,0,D.'s. To «im Dy mai: P.O. 
Bei 3, Caite^i,NJ. 07008. AI praducM m im, W« lU ncK guiranM conpaBldty. Ho nturto. Eidian;« on tMeaJw mtrctiiuKiss 
ONLY, no EXCEPTIONS! "SMpm ctufjes: To tw coni^uMS fa Siiss Si. AlisU an) Hani $10 ts pc St «a. add. APOfFPO tnw 
JS. Canada » IH pc. $1 sa. aSd, NJ. rtjidKitj add 7S saHs Ox. Can lor omnt ptics t, avaiTsMt/. Gwt and Sctool P.O.'s WskSdWd. 
^DOfiS rol Include closaauta, liquidalions or litnilad quaititias and product must bo shipping. 




Plug in your laptop 
in your car, boat or RVI 

■ Plugs into yoijr cigarette tighter tor AC power. 

■ Works wilh vehicle's engine turned on or otf, 

• Supplies AfM watts power surge lor laptop start-up. 

■ Supplies 1 40 watts of continuous power, 

■ Safeguards vehicle's tiattery from draining. 
' 3-year limited warranty. 



^^HH^IBBaiiBI^MHL llillllll 1 1 

TO ORDER, CALL 1-800-366-1505 

Airperor J S A . £3?l Owen Stree!. Santa C'^ra, CAKOW 



CIrcFe Reader Service Number 240 



TALKING A B e s 

A Day At The B«»eh 




TALKS TO YOUR CHILD 
using the PC speaker 1 

Beautiful orf, music and child's 
voice In 5 fun proachODJ gamos. 
Order now and got FREE bonus 
gan^e. Millions of Mazeal 

$20 -t- $4. s/h 

Sand chAc^Lc or f/^an*y ardar ia: 

KAREN CROWTHEf? 

P.O. BOX S9Z 

MENDOCINO, CA 9546D 

<707) 937-3320 Uona^ back guaranla*! 

Ca raa. add $l,fl& «ale* lax. rorolnn add $5. 
GIvo dial* alza: 5i"t]0, 5;"HD, 5j'DD. 3|-'HD 

R«: PC, TandY^nr compatlbl*. EGA, CCA, or VGAi 
and hard disk. 

Orders only: 1 —800 - 59 S- 3916 



Circle Reader Service Number 233 



FREE SPIRIT 
SOFTWARE 



Publisher of educational, enter- 
tainment and utility software for 
IBM, Amiga and C64/128 Is now at 
a new location. 

Barney Bear Goes To Sctiool $39,95 

Barney Bear Goes To Ttie Farm $39.95 
Barney Bear Goes To Space $39.95 

Barney Bear Goes Camping $39,95 

Adventures in Matti $39,95 

1541/t571 Drive Alignment $34,95 

PC-XT Drive Alignment 5,25- S59,95 

Ami,. Alignment System $49,95 

Doctor Ami,, $49.95 

Bravo Romeo Delta (War strategy) $59.95 
Sex Olympics (adult) $39.95 

Free Spirit Software, Inc. 

720 Sycamore Street 

Columbus, IN 47201 

{812)376-9964 FAX: {812)376-9970 



circle Reader Service Number 20S 



Circle Reader Service Number 142 



PC Tools! 



World's l;iri;c-M and lli:ST ciil Ifcliim'i of 
PD/Sharew;ire for PC [irns. cxIl-iimvcIv indL-xcd 
and Z!Pc-dfarbcst value. Save liii\e A: money, leam 
lechniques. Slop reinvcnling! 30 day guarantee. 
VisaAIC/AmEx/COD. Ship/H S5U s'. SlOForeign. 

Eiiidufls 

Visual BASIC 

Windows 

C (Turijo & MS) 

C++ (subset of above) 

dBase Sl Compilers 

Turbo Pascal 

Assembler 

Paradox 

Netware 

1-2-3 and coTTipatihles 

AutoCAD 

DOS (for PC consullaiiis 

DTPtesp. Ven(ura) 

PC Produtls Database 

WordPerfect 

EMS Professional Shareware 

4505 Buckhurst CI.; OInev, MD 20832 

(301) 924-3594, Fax: (301) 963-2708 



Disks/Files 


Prire 


20/225 


S59.50 


nK/716 


$149.00 


91/61(1 


S99.50 


20/129 


S59.50 


120/2000 


S149.00 


47/502 


S79.50 


27/310 


S59.50 


i 1/101 


S59.50 


66/504 


S99.50 


22/258 


S59.50 


16/570 


S59.50 


)41/.'1.16 


S59.50 


69/418 


S79.5() 


43,(XX1 records 


525.0(1 


3K/290 


$59.50 



Circle Reader Service Number 198 



SOFTWARE 
PREVIEWS 

are only a phone call away 
... the mail takes a little longer. 

1-800-433-2938 



Wedgwood Computer 

5312 Woodway Drive 
Fort Worth, Texas 76133 



Circle Reader Service Number 172 



WE'RE THE 

#1 

HOPE 



#3 
KILLER: 

LUNG 
MSEASE 



t 



AMERICAN 

LUNG 

ASSOCIATION' 

The Christmas Seal People * 



Space coniribuTcd by ihc publi:^l^cc as a public sen.ice. 



FREE -15 DISKS -FREE 
FULL OF GREAT SOFTWARE 



Get 15/5.25" or 6/3.5" disks of our 

bestselling VIRUS-FREE software. 

Games • Business • Education 

Utilities* Clip Art •Religion 

Credit cards only I 

PAY ONLY $5.00 FOR SHIPPING 

satisfaction guaranteed since 1985 



IBM® APPLE][(gi APPLE GS® 
IVIAC® AMIGA® 



sn/ic 

SOFTWARE PUBUSHERS 

OflDEH TODAY -CALL 

619 931.8111 EXT 511 



A HIGHER DEGREE OF 



circle Reader Service Number 121 



;^Baa^*^5s& 



5< 

i 




i 

THE MAGIC MIRROR ... a toolbox ' - 
lor your mind. E. Kinnie, PhD., Clinical 
Psychologist, $39.95. 

THE MAGIC MOUNTAIN ... a journey 
into another reality. Not for children. 
Specify male or female version, $29.95 
sact). Both, S39.95. 

MERLIN ... an apprenticeship. $29.95. 

I CHING . . . ancient Chinese wisdom 
and prophecy. $29.95. 

Blue \'«lley, 29 Shepard SL, Walton, NY 13866 

MaalerCardyVise 

1 .800-545-6172 IBM/Compatibles 



(after 5 p.in.) 



and AMIGA 



^?ti^as^r^s. 



i 

i 



^^^m 



Circle Reader Service Number 173 



IBM & MAC SOFTWARE 

CATALOG 

24 Pages! ASP Member 



SOFTSHOPPE, mC 

P.O. BOX 3678 

ANN ARBOR, Ml 4S106 

Tel: (313) 761-7638 

FAX: (313) 761-7639 




^^2^ 



Toil-Free— 24 Hrs. 
1-800-851-8089 



circle Reader Service Numtwr 126 




Eaim Your College 
Degree In Computer 
Science At Home 

Now you can get the opportunity and 
earning power a college degree 
confers— without leaving home 
and without spending thousands 
of dollars. 

The AiCS curriculum 
features: 

^ B.S. and M.S. college 

degree programs 
"^ Approved Ada course available 

* Most courses interactive 

* ALL COURSES H0f^4E 
STUDY 

Proven acceptance 
in business and industry. 

I^any leading corporations have 
approved the AICS program for 
their employees. More than 75 
ennployers have paid the tuition 
for their employees, including a 
number of Fortune 500 
Companies. 

AICS lowers the cost 

of a college degree without 

lowering the standards. 

The academic program includes in- 
depth courses using the same 
textbooks used in major 
universities. Qualified 
instructors are available on 
telephone help lines. 

For Information on Admissions 
and Enrollment Cal!: 
1-205-323-6191 
FAX: 1-205-328-2229 

AMERICAN 2101 OCX 

: ■■:iTITUTE WagnollaAve. 

.J p ^ Birmingham, 
-EM AL 35205 




SCIENCES 

The leading edge of learning 



JULY 1992 COMPUTE 119 



/ 




Press 1 for 

sales. 2 for 

service, 3 for 

live operator 



Voice 
^ Mail 
CaHh 
Machine 

IVlake thousands of dollars effortlessly by installing aBj^/Wo«;/i 
voice card & our menu-driven software in your 286/386. Use il 
to answer your office telephones, rent pockel-pagers, advertise 
mail order producis, or operate a pay-per-call service using major 
credit cards, passwords, or a nationwide 900 #. 

Our '25 PC Opportunity Toolkit contains all the information 
you need to gel started & its cost is applied lo future purchases, 
(Resellers and Developer Inquiries Welcome) 



A Few Home-Based Ventures Featured In Our =25 Toolkit! 



NAME 

BigMouih 
QuickLine 
VickiDialer 
ElderChek 



DESCRIPTION 

Voice Mail/Pager Rentals 
Write Programs in Basic 
Multi-Line Prospector 
Senior Citizen Monitor 



PKG 

MI25. 
M895. 
'2000. 



DEMO KIT 

^25. 1'^ drmo) 

*25, 
'25. 



iid 



□ lAL. 



DemoSource 

t mW 2S.V475y 



818 
718-9560 



8.^4; Rcstda Blvd. Suite 202 ■ Nonhndge. Cjlifomia 91324 ' USA 



Thoroughbred'Greyhound'Standardbred 



60.7% 
Overall 



80% 
Post SeEison 




iilJGrid Master $ 99^ 

iBiPro,Football 19955 

'^lioofeje Buster 149.95 

b";i^ii|ate Fbotbalf 19955 

E Buiietiri Board 150.00 



1992 Football Special: 

items A, B, C,D,&E 

$499.95 




1-800-553-; 

1940 W. State St., Boise, fd'83702 



Stockmarket'Baseball'Basketball'Lottery 



circle Reader Service Number 131 



Circle Reader Service Number 1S2 



TALK TO YOUR COMPUTER 



KVITH VOICE MASTER KEY® 

A PROFESSIONAL VOICE PROCESSING SYSTEM 

ADD UP TO 1024 VOICE COMMANDS TO EXISTING PROGRAMS! Speeds data 
entry arid command input to CAD, desk-top publishing, word processing, spread 
sheBt, data tjase, or game programs. Simply train the computer to recognize a word 
or phrase and assign a series of key strokes to that command. Pop-up TSR program 
features puH-down menus and mouse support. Requires under 15K of main memory if 
EMS present. Near instant response time and high recognition accuracy. 

SOUND RECORDING STUDIO 
Digrtally record your own speech, 
sound, or music. Software control- 
led sampling rate {up to 
25Kfaytes/sec) with graphics- 
based editing and dala compres- 
sion utilities, Create customijed 
audio software for use within 
education, language training, 

gresenlalions, entertainment, elc 
MA data transfer provides con- 
tinuous recording and playback cf 
sound to/lrom hard disk. PC inter- 
nal speaker supported. 

INTERACTIVE SPEECH INPUT AND OUTPUT 

Tag your own digitized audio files to voice recognition macros. Provides speecf; 
response to your spoken commands - all from within virtually ALL DOS applicatiorA 
software! Reduces CRT "eye fixation". Also ideal (or training, security, robotics, factory- 
business-home automation, science experiments, han,djcapped, etc. 

COMPATIBLE wUh talking software from IBM. Milliken. First Byte, Davidson, Optimum 
Resources, Brfiannica Software, Electronic Arts, Hyperglot. Orange Cherry. Wesson 
fnt'l. Viila Crespo, McGraw-Hili, etc. - tsoth DOS and Windows-compatible versJons. 

EVERYTHING INCLUDED Voice Master Key System consists of a haJf-size card, 
durable lightweight microphone headset, software (5,25" floppies unless otherwise 
specified), and manual. Made in U.S.A. One year warranty on hardware. 

ONLY Stdd.dS (plus shipping) 
ORDER HOTLINE call: (503) 342-1571 Monday-Friday 8 AM to 5 PM Pacific Time. 
VISA/MasterCard/American Express phone or FAX orders v^elcome. NO CODS. Add 
$5 shipping charge for delivery in USA and Canada. Payment by persona] check sub- 
ject to 3 week shipping delay. Foreign inquiries contact (iovox for C&F/CIF proformas. 

30 DAY MONEY BACK GUARANTEE ff NOT COMPLETELY SATISFIED. 
CALL , WRITE, or FAX US FOR FREE PRODUCT CATALOG 




CX>VOX INC 

675 Conger Street 

Eugene, Oregon 97402 U.S.A. 



Tel: (503) 342-1271 
FAX: (503) 342-1283 
BBS; (503) 342-4135 



W A 



Fil e Edrt Search Dial 1-7Q2-386-0247 

WINDOWS 900 

The #1 Shareware Source For . . , 
d Business rt Programming 
a Utilities a Fonts 
a Games a Graphics 



^y 



[ARGEmADULTiyiEA! 

Must be 18 or over to call.,. 



Use Your High Speed Modem & Call 



702-386-0247 



2400bps ~ 9600bps V.32/biS V.42/bis 8,N,1 




NO CREDIT CARDS 
NO MEMBERSHIP 
FAST, EASY ACCESS 



■^^'■•-^ ' 



'^ 



circle Reader Service Number 230 



CLOSEOUTS 

For [BM/MS-DOS: 



SSISPEQALS $19.5Deach 
Coiiriidown lo DMmstfay, HiHsfar, 
Dragcnstnke. iniefcsptQr, Typhoon qI 
StH. noa'QwjrEuropa. QuesTronIt, 

Sonsol Libert/. PnaniasfD3. 
StarComrnand, FifslOvei Gerinaiy, 
Heroes of rhflLancj. War of ihe Unce 

AVALON-HILL SIDeach 
Under Fire.Telengirfl.SupErSunday. 
NBA Saskeiball. Guff Strike 
INFOCOM DEALS StSflZCh 
Wmaso! Tiijn LealiierGodafiEEK 
SIERflA BARGAINS %\9.Sa aACh 
DaviflWciT. ^l3nhjn!erSF.Firehawl( 

mCflOPROSE SIG.&QMCh 
Carrier CcrT]m^n<],St3iGl:'derll,X'Men 
Rick DanQ*fgiis.Giiri Ship. Pirates'. 
F-! SStrike Eajjle, Weird Dreams, 
"niflPunisher, OrDoomsRevenge, 
Airtome Ranger, Savage.Sola Right 
MANV OTHER TITLKS & 



CFIECHT CARD OHDERS 
S25 MINIMUM. 

1-800-676-6616 

Ocdersgnly. please'! 



CmENAWAflEDEALS iUMtKi\ 
SlJ-S3gall SO I .AirSinkaaSA. 
RochttfianijBr. DetentJerol trtaCrcwn 
Drjooniord. TVSjKftsf 0'DltHllD' 
^V&pa^^$Ba5llEt^Hll(VGA> 
ELECTRaNICZD0$1Q.50a»h 
Darnspyre, Gataciic Empire, XiptiOs. 
KivaJajr.V-king Child DiFiieiaimJJOO 
UBI SOFT BARGAINS jIG.SOeach 
B.A.T,H>gj1tHLnter,ProTe-nmsToLf1. 
orPick nP.ie 
IHTERPLAYDEALS Slfi.SOsi^ 
Jamei&ontI FulureWars.Neuroma.icer 

BRITANMCA&ALES16.5Dhi^ 
ArchiF«kinos.Eyeo(Horijs.jLisltriflfM, 
Jifly.-. W.ii<iiuir8?(jrWHftiilr5Lrarxa, 

Accolade speciacs iiQ,$Oflicti 

E!ufi Angels, Cycles Djyaltlifl'>.ptr. 

GnsrdPn^CirculofHarmory 

BHQDEHBUND SIE.SOflich 

Dart(HiarlJu1(njl.SVyCtase,Piciiorary. 

KONAMI CLOSEOUTS Sl4.S0«aGll 

Castiev-anaSLiipefC, Double Onbtie 

Mti3lG'ar_cirgiad;5nfS!"i?' 



COMPSULT 

PO E0)(5t£0 
SAN LUIS OaiSPO CA33^Q3 



WE ALSO CARFtr APPlE, MAC. €64/1 ZB. AMIGA, ATARI S MORE 
To oilier. serid_fheck or money ofder Id the jbpwe address Calilofjiia arceis 
mosiincfiifle/zS^ssaliMtax AllofdflfSrriijstirTJudestiippifigcrarisesalsSlDr 
USA SaiorCanaCa.orSISIcrlftieinaitional Fo(;Dijrcornpie!ecata.lcigMr,dS2in 
US. postage stamps Df cash AcatalogjsseniFREEwiiharryQriJ'er 
Besuretospecityvsurcorr^putef^pewhenordifij^g 
For ill producl InqiiriBS S addEtJonal Information, call (8051 54i4-6S1B, 



Circle Reader S«rvic« Number 150 







^ 




Accurate Disk Copy , 

One Pass Disk Copier 

For Windows 3.x 

(sid or 3Kf> enli. imicles) 

True Multitasking 

• Copy /Compaif any 
sinndnrd di^ik nbile 
running ullivr projinitiis 

• Make any number of 
copies rrom a single pass 

• lists hard disk or RAM 






for more Inronnation, call: 619-275-0T5S 

lAcCURATE <ti Q QC 
1 ECHNOLOGIES. ^^^'^^ 





Circle Raador Service Number 1G5 




Jit'ersonalized 
Children's Books 

• Make Money At Home With Your Computer 

• Print Personalized Children's Books 

• Superb Quality • Unbeatable Price 



^ 




Best Personalized Books 

3107 Chapel Dowtu Dr., DaUas, TX 75229 
For Information Kit Call: 

(214) 357-6800 

circle Reader Service Number 260 





COLOR RIBBONS & PAPER 



Colors: Block, Red, Blue, Green, Brown, Purple, Yellow 



Ribbons: 

price each 



I Black 



Brother 1109 i$5.50 $6.50 

Citizen 20O/GSX 140 4.00 5.00 

Citizen GSX 140, 4-Cotor 12,50 

Epson MX/FX/RX 80/85 3.75 4,50 

Okidata 182/192 s.OO 7.50 

Panasonic 1190/1124 5.00 7.50 

Commodore MPS Call For 

Star NX1000 3.50 4-50 

Star NX1000, 4-ColQr 6.25 

Star NX1020 6,00 ' 7.50 

Star NX1020 4-Color 10.50 



T-ShIrt 
Color R lbbong 
$7.50 

7.50 

15.00 

6.75 



Price 
6.75 
10.00 

* 
15.00 



T-Shiff (Heot Transfer) Color Ribboni 



COLOR PAPER 

Color Paper 200 shoots assorted 

Bright fbck; 9-1/2*11 

RaslBl fcct: 9-l/2s1l 

Color Certificoto fcpor: 100 sheets 

Color Bonner Fb per: _. .^^ f t./fQil _._„_ 

Mm. ordeu JTSTOTMinimuiTi SXFTISBO, Call for other riblxjiu ond 
mpplios. JMcB ond spec, ore subject to chonqe w/o notice. 



I10.90/pk 
$ 7.90/pk 
S 9.95/pk 
t a.95/pk 



RAMCO COMPUTER SUPPUES 

P.O. Box 475, Manteno, IL 60950 U.S.A. 

(USA) 800-522-6922 or 815-468-8081 

[Canada} 800-621-5444 



(Bcrsonaiized Cfuldrms (Boo^ 
^^B-V BOOi> 




Earn $5,000 
Per Month 




circle Reader Service Number 16a 



Cos ft In On !%fi (Profits 
iHome 'Based or On Location 

Join ttie Fastest Growing Personalized 
Children's Book Company in the Industry 
Unlimited Support For Youf Success. 
High Quality Hard Bound Books 
Earfi Color Story ... An Educational Tool 
Limited Number of Dealerships Available 



For More Information, 

Call or Write: 

MY STORY BOOKS, INC. 

11408 AudeliaRd. 

Suite 4845 
Dallas, TX 75243 

1 -800-245-7757 

A PROUD SPONSOR OF 
CHILDREN'S LITERACY 



circle Reotter Service Number 210 



Making Personalized 
Children's Books 



Turn a ST}\all invcsUncnt into that profitahle 
full or pQTt time business you have always 
dreumed abautl 

An I'XcellL'nt hume opcrattrd business! Books 
sell fast in stures! At fairs! Parlies! Mallsl Or 
mail order . . . anywhere there are people. It's 
tasy to malce 34,000 to $8,000 per monch 
making and selling our exciting line of 
personalized books (for children &. grown' 
ups.) Personaliied audio tapes and stationery 
available also. 

Find out how to build a 
business of a lifetime! 

Call (214) 248-9100 TODAY! 






My Very Own Book^ D&K Entetpriscs, Inc. 
3216 Commander Drive, Suite 101 
Depl. 27. Carrolllon Texas 75006 



Circle Reader Service Number 176 



V 



BEATiheLOTTERY 

Gall Howard's ALL NEW Smart Luck 
ADVANTAGE PLUS" 

UseADVANTAGEPUJS'"&vcXJ'llfrasriallyourofherlott9iV 
software. It's the most complete, fastest S; eosiesf to use 
-In a class by itself tJothIng can tjegin to compare! 

• NO OTHER SOFTWABE HAS MOM SCIENTFfIC TOOLS FOB 
naiNG WINNERS. 

• lei Smort Picks" lielp you pick Itie winning numbers 
instantly, automatical lyl 

• A MAJOS BSCAKTHIIOUSHI JusI one single key stroke 
lets you test, game by game, tfie past accuracy of 
Smart Picked numbers, 

• Scoreboard tallies best picks from all ctiarts ond sons 
numbers from most chosen. 

• Has ALL data for ALL 42 stole Lotto gomes. 

• A 529S.00 Value. Your introductory price for a limited 
time only: S79.95*S3.0OS,/H 

SMARTUKXSOnWARE 

tept C-12.P0 Box1519'WtiiteRahs.NY'!0<502 
800-e76-GAIL(4245)of914-761-2333 



30 lofo JackDOt Winners WOM J7J.» lUUIOH 

with'GAl HOVWD'S SYSTE//5' 



Circle Read^f Service NumtKr 109 



XXX-RA7EJ> 



CD-f^OH 

Must slate age 21 
Oilier Products Available 

+ 70 VGA movies ' 

+ Over 600 VGA GfF images ^°, 

+ ResQlutions of 640x480 & up Femai 
+ Completely menu-driven; Easy to use 
+ Setup & compressed lor use on BBS 
+ DOS & WiiTdows utilities included 
+ No liard drive installation required 



Send check/money order to: 
Starware Publistiing Corp. 
P.O. 80x4188, Dept. 68 
Deertieid Beacti. FL 33442 

Add S3 S&M 
Add S3 Foreign 
FL add 6% sales tax 



800-354-5353;^ 

24 HOURS/ 7 DAYS ^^ 
US & Canada OnJjrs »w 
For more information, 
CrerJitCanJFAXOrtBre 
& Foreign Onjers call 
Voice 305 -426 -4552 
FAX 305 -426 -9801 



REMOVE 
HARDWARE LOCKS 



PROTECT YOUR II^VESTMENTl 
MAINTAJN PRODUCT1VITYI 

Software utility that allows for 
the removal of fiafdware locks, 

Avajlable for most major 

CAD/CAM and PCB 

tadwarc progranu 

Easy - Simple - Guaranteed 
Programs start at $99.00 U.S. 

Vlu and Mulercard Welcamc 
Call orFaxformon Infonnallon 



Stimuli Sjntmi Inc. 

MJ-UOO Concordia Art. 
miiiiI|>tg.Mb. KXASt 
Canidi 



TAX (3W) iO-iiU 



Circle Reader Service Number 143 



ATTENTION! 
HP 95LX OWNERS 



MEMORY CARDS 



■ STATIC RAM CARDS FOR THE HP 95LX 
AND fulANY OTHER POPULAR HANDHELD 
COMPUTERS. 

■ SUPERIOR QUALITY - LOW COST. 

■ 12BK - 2MB \N STOCK NOWl 

■ CALL TOLL FREE FROM ANYWHERE IN 
THE USA AND CANADA. 

1-800-223-0503 



ACTIVE DATA MEMORY CARDS 
CONSUMER DIVISION — 

4642 E CHAPMAN, SUITE 304 
ORANGE, CA 92Se9 U.S.A. 
PHONE 714.'99?-77T8 
FAX 7M/997-023B 



sst-; 



ACTIVE 



ExclusiveSoftware 



ij XldSXttAffCOZ^ [nuani Ii4c d^it for US co^ul msk^ for US 
NOAA!ocations(civ(r2flOOto^jll^i^e<-high and lo* mk iim« andhflghiSH 
JuH pkka loca:ton aMJjic anigei tabl^^ arbd gmpliMu vrrreci or pnnieilouT. 
Covers l'W;4:9.1 i;pdatcsju hilf price. "A mu« if vixi M]1 uc Hih. Iiiccllcn) " 

PC Mji;iL(incTfKiu%ariJ\of«iii.r*ilui*rtTlBM&C<)mpp*r State $39.95 

D ^USbTO W&IC " [npul dilc and ItxratLHii dJid )!.cL xilronornical dali for 
Sur, Moon Jind all plancU. Includes ritc/Kl limn, allilialc and luirruEh, n^hl 
aMrcn&idBL and dccliiialiDil, phjsc. dianictcr, disIailCcs frd:ti Sjn imd Eailh. 
MglltIU:ss.l.ideft^altime.it]iulilJlinw.lO1lei(^de&lAI)tUile,elt>^BatiD^l.0{b)[al 
eleTner.U.nwic. Uwdbylhousa-id^QfamalcursApTorcssiwialvlBM $29.95 

J Finances Super^* complete tmlboH or rtnancial calcula- 
[tun^. Irdudcs 49 fuiKdon^ nuchas mod^aj;ci,annuitin, prcsf nl valucy future 
viiues. depreciilion. b^illoon irnuiliet. effcclive tkIc viih puint^. 4 fnttor 
aiialv:>is. rule of 78 loans, bond yields arid dtJiCoufth. Llsti floWtv. ^vbaCk 
aralyMS, marc! t^op-upcdcndir, calculator, help wrcenv IBM >49.95 

Zl HoroSCOplCS H"* tteal aN(rul(>£y. fun and cosy lo uur. Input 
binhdaif anil luKaiior ojid |!cl titicirfcojx charj with /odiur i\%ns, Sjn, Moon 
mdplaiieiv. Gives interpretive rending tubedDn irKJiiiDnsofaMrology iilcuJiig 
■iunanJ moon sign, planeiary posiiuns arult>ic aiiccndani and aspects. Grt labl^ 
of hou^s, 7 aspects &a$lroro[nicaldal^ lOtiCiaflmppy users. IBM $29.95 

^ JUTUf EiCK'^ 10 types of comptster an r»r hour^ of enteminment. 
Inchdes Frdcials. Moire paiiemi, Sieirin^ki cun ;■*. Spifopraphv, Wallpaper 
ait. Serendipitous circles. lildimcnMnnji !ifcp^ltcm'>.[iit;!ijrc^fr(itiinan>cs. 
m«rc!SuppansCG.VEO..\A'CA.Coloifulandloisorfuii: IBM $29.95 



1-800-533-6666 



24 Hrs' TDays, in PA Call 412-t22-(>MI0 FAX 412-422-9930 

By plione or mail. Check. .M.O..VisLi or MC (#&cxp.|. S4 shpg. 
rn PA add 6?<r. .Add SI /prog, for 3.5" IBM Jisl. Fa.M Shipmenl! 

1900 Murray Ave. Dept. F 
Pittsburgh, PA 15217 



ZEPHYR 

SER VICES^REE Calafog- 1 39 Programs 
Circle Reader Service Numbar 110 



CIreia Reader Service Number 130 



Circle Reader Service Numtwr 134 



SHAREWARE 

IBM COMPATIBLE 



$1.2 5/[]LL5k fS/skippliigr 
S SPECIALS (KD 
1 Arcade Gaines S3 
10 Strategy Games S3 
Home Office (5) S3 

j.^^,1 XXX list Available ido 
with PROOF of age "^*^ 

3.5 "or 5.25"Same Price! 
FREE CHTHLOG ! 

CHLL-UiilTE-USE REHDCIi SEKUICE 



COMPRO SOFTWARE 

1-800-PC-DISC3 

P.O. BOK H^Zh 

Star Ci^y. WV ZbSOH 



circle Reader Service Number 187 



The BEST in IBM 
Shareware 



WINDOWS - GEOS 

GRAPHICS - DTP 

PRODUCTIVITY 

GAMES - BIBLE 

LOTS MORE! 



Send $2 for sample disk & 
SUPER catalog (refundable) 



NSKOVKItS 

I I Dept. I 

1/ P.O. Box 9153 
•^ Waukegan, IL60079 



Be your own boss. ..and earn 

profits up 
to 300% 

If you qualify 

We are the original ... and clearly 

the best business 

opportunity today offering 

satisfaction, flexibility, and high 

profit potential! 



CALL TOLL FREE 
1-800-722-0200 



Academ ic Guidance Servicesjnc 

1 5000R Commerce Parkway, 

Dept. C692 

Mt. Laurei, NJ 08054 




The Amish Outlaw 

Shareware Company 

3705 RkchmorhJ Ave. Sliten bland NY 10312 



Top Ten 



l.DUKE NUKEM 6. DARK AGES 

2.C0MMANDER KEEN 7. TANK WAR 
3.GROUND WAR 8. JUMP JET 

4.CRySTAL CAVES 9. SUPER ZZT 
5.CHINESE CHECKERS lO.BASS DUEL 



Ail dtiks conx Willi a nKnu lyslem jim Type "fo' lo sun tity 
$.1,110 I- 9 12.50 10 . more plus J.1.0USrtl 
I=HEE GIFT wmi EVERY ORDER 



Circle Reader Service Number 135 



Circle Reader Service Number 248 



Order l-SOO-947 -4346 or C7m)3l7-0]98 
Fax;{7 18)966-4766 

Circle Reader Service Number 118 




Magic Tricks 
on your PC/// 

The only program in 
the world that can 
perform Magic.'.'.' 

For the first time ever, your PC will amaze 
your friends with 5 stunning tricks: mind- 
reading, ESP, predictions, X-ray vision, 
and more. Easy to learn. Cornea with in- 
struction manual and props. 

$22 + 3 s/h 

Send c^eck or money order tO" 

MicroMagic Productions 

175 Stti Avenue Suite 2625 

New York, NY 10010 

ei2) 969.0220 

Requires IBM PC or compatible with VGA, EGA of 
CGA. Also: 10-trick professionaf versbn (S48 * 5 s/(i) 
and 1 -trick Demo ijjsk (S3 + S3 s/h) 



Circle Reader Service Number 197 



Special Offer 

Htfran Voice. Sard, orxj Mixjc Sott,wae ord Hordwore oJ in one 

EducattsooJ Sothvore Corrlstnation r^ 

Offer by D&S Woijsterro - COWPJLEAJiNSoflwaro 

hcludes COVOX PotenlBd 'Spsech Diing' Vofehg s^em. 



'howIH IMI (jNlVlllSE IS yoU« 




UsW 



uaKtHmmkunmiDdkUif 

L6(i to Ir. * «ti iW m jj* jikK ■ SB 111 if« 

Ccrrtraicn i:^ ^ 

GMt pdaM ^p»cA trg' kCi 

Let Km In tti UCs tm U S;Mi ithiire ' S.B pU ^ri 

pliiabNMMSUetedat 

Soflvwe fecdiK At*f/ lo iite xl wtfi diiieri wi lureii vxe. 
MJBpte « IBV* f.'.AJi? cii ircdute wdabte. 
Bequremenls I6W fClJKt^ a IdS Conpaft*. MCKB. 

Vbca IWI Feoii/ei: COVOX pc«eni«) •Sjeedi Wno' 

FwtuK Cooreds to eastng Rinter ftjfft on you Cttnpjlw eaiv. 

FVJ|S txjct dgtHJ Hurrai *C8, lAic ond Souid 

Wala »i«li KOJi £*e pooJa EduaAfd otvl mtHtarmenl ssftwoe. 

To Order Cal: (516) 538-1243 

OSiG Infosvstem Inc., Box 4670, Hempsteod, NY 1 1550. 

* Dodei hquattsi wsknxne. 



Circle Reader Service NurntMr 229 



Protect 

Our 

Natural 

Resources. 

Children are our greatest 
resource. Ttie Boys & Girls Club 
provides them with a positive 
environment in Vi^hich to leorn 
and grov^. Moke a contribu- 
tion today, so they con make 
one tomorrow. 




DOYSSi GIRLS CLUB 



Dick OUver't 

fractal Grafics 
Guidebook & Software 




FREE ILLUSTRATED BROCHURE 

"You Can Explore 

the Latest Breakthroughs 

in Science and Math on Your PC 

(and Have Fun Doing It)" 

•*^Cedar software 802-888-5275 

Circle Reader Servii:» Number 21S 



Your name here 
Your address 



Over_LAZ 

Custom Letterheads 
FOR WordPerfect 5.0/5.1 

Print your own letterhead from WP 
5.0/6.1 automatically on your HP 
LaserJet II or PostScript printer. Wide 
variety of fonts and styles to choose 
from. We can also add your corpo- 
rate logo at no extra cost. Includes 
over 75 Over_LAZ office forms, rub- 
ber stamps and page borders. Call, 
write or FAX for details. 

Only S25 (US), S29 (CDN), -i- S2 p&h. 
Check, money order or VISA, 

Heme Data Systems Ltd,, Box 250 
Tiverton, ON, CANADA, NOG 2T0 

Voice or FAX (519) 366-2732 



circle Reader Service Number 236 



C MSP ) 

QUALITV 
VALUE 



Think you can turn thai losing team In to playotf 
contenders? Well, here's your c^sncal With 
GM FOOTBALL you'rs ths HEAD COACH and 
Uia GENERAL MANAOERI 

GM FOOTBALL FEATURES: 

FUIXANIUATION aAUE/3£AAON STaTISTCS 

nOUr^O ar nOUND DAA^ PtCKA OWCOHtWOPLAVEHkOOCS 

*aEHTfiJ^Uim MEOOTlATiaNa CKMlSrnOH OAhlKS 

aU&SPE£[VSTAi«tf4A HATtNa H.f.L PIAYOFFS 

CLU5IC UUatC ANO MUCH k«>AQ 

ORDER TODAVI 
CALL 1-«aCM34-1142-4729 or Writa: 



ONLY $49.99 



MSP 

P.O. BOX 2S«2 

MEWPORT NEWS, VA 23609 

FREE SAME DAY SHIPPitJO. 2ND DAY AIR. 



Video Gaming 



WANTED 



•NINTENDO -GAMEBOY 

■ SUPER NINTENDO • SEGA 

• SEGAGENESIS -GAME 

.TURBOGRAPHIX-16 SYSTEMS 



^WE NEED OVER 100,000 
GAMES IMMEDIATELY 
. . .PROMPT PAYMENT 

PRICES QUOTED ON THE PHONE 

718-229-1435 



WE ARE THE LARGEST 

MAIL ORDER USED VIDEO 

GAME COMPANY IN THE 

WORLD. BUYING & 

SELLING GAMES 

SINCE 1982. 



We buy all Super Nintendo games 

for $20.00 (15.00 if the box is 

missing) except Super Mario World 

We sell all titles for 34.95 -«- 4.00 

shipping & handling. 



WE WE 

BUY SELL 

SEGAGENESIS 8-20 20-40 

NINTENDO 4-25 10-40 

GAMEBOY 5-7 15-17 

TURBOGRAPHIX-16 2-15 10-30 

SEGA MASTER 1-4 10-20 



We also buy only IBM 

(compatible) computer 

games. All titles with 

original box & instnjctions 

for $4.00 each. 



Send $1 .00 (no checks 

please) for complete catalog 

with buying & selling prices for 

over 1 1 00 different titles to: 




Circle Header Service Number 222 



P.O. Box 671 8-C 

Flushing, N.Y. 11365 

718-229-1435 



WANTED 



circle Reader Service Number 227 



ur ■— <Lii« ri i-f Ia 




EXCJTiElvlENT 



$1.25 Per 5.25" Disk 
$1.50 Per 3,5" Disk 

All The Popular New Programs 
For XT's, AT's, and Windows. 

No Minimum Order. 

FREE CATALOG 

inHaw^i 808-935-461 4 
>., other. 1-800-654-2467 

IZAK CMC 

P.O. Box 5476, Hilo, Hi 96720 



Circle Reader Service Number 107 



286 to 386 

UPGRADE! 

starting at only $ 1 99 

Al fordablc: .Sliitlcss! The 380 SuptrChip 
II cat! lonvcri your 280 IBM, Compaq, or 
AT «ini[)nlible Co a 386. Run Windows 3.x 
in [he cri]i;inrr(i niotlc, mn OS/2 v. 2.0, 
ijliiizf MS DO.S .■).() or DR DOS 0.0 
l.oatlhii^h ;nul l>cvicchit;]i programs. 
Speed up your processor (increase on an 
AS T I'rciiiiuin ^80 iisini; Norton SI 
version 4.5 goes from ll.2 lo 15. C!). Math 
accelerator hoard (32 Mhz) also available 
for your 287 Math Co-processor, S99. 

Gordon & Associate's 

lOHSl Hillings Court 
(•■aithersburg, Maryland 20879 

Teiephone or Fax 

(301) 977-1329 



Circle Reader Service Number 2SZ 



"^^ Learn '' 
Computers! 

Home study. 
Learn the per- 
sonal compu- 
ter for a better 
^m career and an 
Sm easier home 
— life. Exciting, 
easy to follow. 
Free booklet. 

Call 800-223-4542 

The School OF 
Computer Training 

12245 Perimeter Park 
Dept. KH680. Atlanta, Georgia 30341 

Circle Reader Service Number 112 




s 


Come To Play! 


1- 
o 

3 
Q 
O 


With NO HOURLY CONNECT or 
LONG DISTANCE CHARGES 
From Over 800 U.S. CiUesI 

■ CB-Style Group and Private CHAT 

■ lOOO'a Of Shareware fttjgramsl 

■ Business and Personal Servlceal 

■ Travel & Fll^t Scheduling with OAGI 

■ Giant Message Fcjrums & Claaslfledsl 

■ Live Multiplayer Realtime Gamcsl 

■ Matchmaker Datlngbasel Plus Morel 

FOR SrOWMP OR MORE INFO CALL 

818-358-6968 

BY MODEM, a/N/1 3/12/3400 BAUD 



Circle Reader Service Number 141 



GARDENING SOFTWARE 



Get A 

Green 

Thumb! 




Navr bring Ihe power ot your PC Into your gerdeni Use 
RoolDireetory^' TREES or FLOWERS (S49.95 ea) to 
select just the rightplantioryourgarden. Does everything 
except plant your plants. Use BUGS™ (S69.951 to help 
control insect pests in your garden ttirougti safe, organic 
methods Over 135 gardeninsects. Includes hypertext, 
windcwirg and graphics. Add S3-00 tor shipping. 

Mc/visa 71 4-698-5057 
I GardenTech or write: 

* P.O. Box 1 046 ■ Temecuia, CA 92593 



■tiiyji^fiFilSiklclsWdBlttbi 



(The $29.95 CAD Program) 

Create your own : 

- Floorplans - Drawings 

- Landscapes - Flowcharts 

- Organization Charts 

- Circuit Schematics 

- and more in colorful detail ! 
*IBM & Compatible PC's* 
* IBM ' Epson ' HP Printers • 

Tn"Tcch Software, Inc. 

P.O. Box 1657 
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702 



1-800-359-9086 



Visa & Mastercard Accepted 



Circle Reader Service Nuinber 200 



/'xxx 

Rated 



VGA^ 



Not aVideol NotaCartoonI But true film quality, 
ccmputer.animated movies by professional ariistsi 

Beyond Your Wildest Dreams! 

The Ultimate Erotic Fantasy! 

Physically & Humanly Impossible! 



Hard Drivs ■ £M a ConpafUe. 



Circle Reader Service Number 115 



Haniwan Requratmnts 
SSeCdaVQAMSVOA 

Full lengtli Motion Pidure, Vdune 1 - 129.00 (3 IJcAs). 
taenia Diik ' tiD0(1 i^sk). Hns« State 5-1^ H 3-1/2 Disks. 
Bus S?-SO Slirfiing k H^(f ng. N J. Resdentadd 7H Sales Tai. 

Send Chtck or yoney Order. UttttfMnd Viu accepted. 
IPD 24 W. RaJnsad Avo., Suite 111, Tenafly, I^J. 07670 
(201)947-5252 

\ Musi State Age Over 21, ^ 

Circle Reader Service Number 160 



NOW USE YOUR 

COMPUTER TO 

MAKE UNLIMITED 

MONEY! 



Diet Guidance I ntcrnational is no w 

offering qualified individuals the 

opportunity lo own theirown 

Computerized Weight Loss Business. 

• Full-TimcorPart-Tinnc 

• Up to 300% profit! 

• MaTkct=48Millionpeoplccachycar 

$495 required if accepted 

SEND FOR A FREE BROCI lURETODAYt 



DielGuidance International 

2131 Pierce BI.Dcpt. COM Sui1c3,SinFnilcisM,CA941 13 



OR CALL 800-776-4347 



Circle Reader Service Number 250 



IBM SOFTWARE 

Accounts Payable. .. $29 

Telecom $29 

Screen Designer. ... $29 

Horoscope $20 

10 Key $20 

PC-Write Tutorial. .$29 

Utilities .$29 

16 bit and 32 bit, 
256K, 2 Drives, CGA, 
EGA, VGA. 
HUNTLEY ENTERPRISES 
2261 Market St, #296 
San Francisco, 
CA 94114-1693 
Voice-Fax 
Visa * MC * Amex 
(415) 431-8179 

circle Reader Service Number 203 



End the DOS Nightmare! 
V/ake Up to InCommanR 



V ftcricng w.th :X?S Uurinfl iw day is toeprnQ yog op e; 
jiiflht Hfs tfma to ge! fnO^mmond 1 

PCM Magadrw PuMlslier'a Ptd( 10^1 
"A powerful supplement lo DOS».. Microsoft should 
have thought of iheso InCommand irtiNtto."* 

<Tflxt Seofdi: lue soewi brcwsa, kng rnodos, wholo-wotd^Xify 

<;p^, mofe toaiurw than Norton 
-Exacuta: an ycKX own programs and batii lies as. H nay 

r^ aJI ihe InCofmnanij f to MJ«cbon (xpabtities 
'Hovo (iMtnoul copytr>[}], Rbtwetw, DaMs, tXradory (sortad, 

inducing He find]: files. (Jrectoriw. (X ©ntife tees 
'Copy: niilip^ (VoppJas ki ona axnmanii'. incnKTwmal badufv 

Up to 40% fastw b rtoppiM O^an XCOPY 
•On^ne IrrCaTunind & DOS referenca CScttar than 00$ SO's**] 
^Ptiystcal drsctory sort, network oompaBt^a, and mticii morel 

FroductMty You OnTy Dreemed Of, Until Niwi 
FUt rtghl tum tn E)OS prompt Mo menui to riow ytu down 
MiAii^ff Vs h ia fid dmcfctrivlddnlL 
Sete] (and s^ludQ] rrxUMa «idcinl poteme ai onca. 
Salad Bas BeHDRE. ARQl. gr ON any dalertiim. BIGGefl v SMALiER 

tfian any stza, irfti or wttioul any ifiAutoi. 
PtocMi! flmh) (k«iory ims u m^ 

as 0(19 tta. 

MucA DIM/ OlVtSO 

C^ now hx dans dbfc 
You can rest easy wttli /nCommond. 



Inductive Logic 

P.0- Bo> 26Z38 
San Oooo. CA S8I96 



Iiilelligeiil Soflwaiv for Eveiy User 



Circle Reader Service Number 1 27 



THE LEADER IN 
LOTTERY SOFTWARE 



LEVERAGE YOUR ODDS! 

Pick your lono numbers and test 

your strategies with ease, tun. 

and confidence. 



Lotto Leverage™ Features: 




■ W(jft*Jf7>efwWM%nJ Grapftcs lor Analysis 
' Fun and A&ijrflvuated Wheeling 

• PertcurmanceTrachai 

■ Lono SIMULATE Gftmo 

' FREE US Pick* Lonery Databases 

' FREETBCrmiCalSiJppol 

' Mouse Support ImouHoptionAl} 

' Conte*! Ser^iuvo H«o 

■ PuH Down Menus A Pi>p-Up Wjndcuws 

• Screen amUor Pnn^ef OiSOlays 
' 30 Day Money Bee* GuaianiM 

Lono Ltviragm" „,Pfar to Win* 



To orcfar (MCA/isa) call 1-«00-029-««fli 
or send Check or WO mStt disketio sua lo 



Tectinotogy Link, Inc 
PO. BOK 1102 
Litiertyviile, iiinois 60048 



Sa&.dS + 54 S/H 
6 5\ ta^s Uu} 



Circle Reader Service hfumber 204 




The Toner 

Re Charge Group 

Specializing in 
remanufacturerlng 
of Laser printer 
cartridges 
reasonable pricing 
and quality control 
assured Call for 
pricing and delivery 
1-800— 6BB-689B 

A Sully owned subsidiary of 
QuBiity Innovations, Inc. 

5Sa N. DcBn Rd. OrinndB FL 

33626 



VISUAL FANTASIES 
ON CD-ROM!!! 



450+ Megs of the Hottest Adult Graphics Anywhere! 
Enjoy the Best and Own the Most 



Select Your Favorite Fantasy and Tag the Pictures of Your Choice. 
Enjoy Viewing the Sizzling Pics of the Ultimate Erotic Slide Show. 
Designed for the Best in Adult Entertainment. Not a "BBS" disc. 
Over 2,500 640x480 & Up VGA/SVGA Photos. Average File Size: 180K. 
Choose to Load Direct from CD-Rom or Hard Drive to Optimize Speed. 

For Sale to Adults Only. ***** Oflly 99.95 ***** Must Slate 21 or Over. 



KGB World Facts 99 
USA Wars:. Vietnam 99 
Space Series Apollo 95 
Lang of the World 295 
N. Am. Fax Book, 149 
Street Atlas USA Call 
CIA World Facts 79 

Terrorist Groups 79 



CD Rom Software Specials! 

The Original Shareware 1992 99 

Battle Chess for the MPC 59 

World View MPC Media Clips 39 

Wild Places MPC Media Clips 39 

Audubon's Multimedia Mammals 47 

Ebert's Home Movie Companion 65 

CoatBS Art Review: Impressionism 99 

The USA state Factbook 89 



STW Game Pack II 67 

The Family Doctor 79 
European Mortarchs 99 

Toolworks Ref Lib 99 

RBBS In a Box 97 

Total Baseball 79 

Middle East Diary 99 

CD Roms in Print 99 



Creative Labs Multimedia Upgrade Kit: Includes Sound Blaster Pro , Fast Panasonic CD -Rom 
Drive, Microsoft Bookshelf, Jones in the Fast Lane, Sound Clip Anthologies, & More S599.00 



FREE: 12.95 Value DISK CADDY With Purchase Over S1 00.00* 



'SlOO Minimum Order requirement does no! include shipping or applicable taxes. 

MCA/ISA/AMEX, Ck/MO. 24 hrs/7 days. Add 4.00 Shipping. CA Residents Add 8.25% 

PC CompoNet Inc. 2060 Emery Ave., Suite 216 La Habra, CA 90631 TEL: (310) 943-9878 

Call... 1 (800) 524-381 1 Toll Free 

Order Via FAX at (310) 947-1131 
circle Reader Service Number 177 



n] SeXXy 

J SOFTWARE 



SeXXy Disk #1 ■ An un- 

bel<ev]ble vi^a! !/i:cijn^er - UEJST 

StEnBDKIiSZndimt ADDED. 

SeXXy Disk *2 ■ 3 HlcuijntH 

Djmes lor Iriends znd lovt^s Qjar- 

inteed lo shtj botl^ clQthes and 

intnbrtons- 

SeXXy Disk #3 - NEWI Trj 

lo SCOTS in over 150 Romantic 

BicounlErs - idv?r^ure jan^ 

SeXXy Disk «4 ■ NEWI 

Waich Gingef in i^is rnrrrfdlBle 9 

mjnuti mtN\t. 

SKtXf Disk as ■ «£W 

VEFSIONI Creal! your nun 

lanizses aSoU trienJs & lovers. 

SeXXyDlsli#6.Vre<>.[irniai 

eii\ Ifn imWTtq pictures including 

ceieOritiis. 

S7 ucti, any 3 Iji t17, or all 

6 tor t32. For [BM i compal. 

nr.t rr.tfWtrjirriCTrwn 



CONNOISSEUR 
COLLECTION 

ALL HEWItnZSB Color VGA!! 

Disk •CC1 - Ir YDU BE THE $Ttfl * 
Tht FIRST CUSTOMIZABLE mono allows 
you to wrte [he Dialog and trie irtte ONLY 
AVAilAStE fSOM US! 
□ Ilk fCC2 • THE FIRST SOUKD 
HOVIEI Tnt (irs! COnlpLttJ rnovir *ittl 
SOUKD. Sec tire incrtOiOlt 255 cokir VM 
cracttics wttile neanno t^e actual Ocalog 
OURS EXCLUSlVELr! 

Disk «CC3 - THE BEST MOVIEI Thf 
SisI corrputer movje aw^ab* Only for tfe 
HricLiscQl^cJcr ?56 stunn na VGA colCfS 
Disk »CC4 . VOLUPTUOUS MOVIE 
wlUi Soundl Sre and ^w 3 symdlcny cl 
SJtteoTitjrjtry pioponio^fl women. 

Dllk (CCS . ODDITIES MDVIE alltl 

Soundl See and nie.i ol licredi[)le 
proponons and Mmen wrlll oniqije aOrl^iCS 
' UKBEUEVEABLE! 

I Udvte t29. 3 Movies ten. S Movk $94. 
Ail CC Disks Require VGA monitdr and 
tiard disir - over 1 V3 ot action 



ScXXcapades — Tne first aduit game witn TRUE SOUNO and 80 
sizzling 25$ coioi VGA scenes • Se»ual preleience ano ioreplay options - Play 
Mtti 2-8 ciosA Inends ■ Over 5UB ol pule action! . Fulfill your sexual desires 
wiin neipir expenences - Find out fiow your pamer wtiuld lea!^ like to ma^ iove 

J79 - Special Otter (69 witti purcfiasfi ot any CC rtjsk above 
OURS EXCLUSIVELY! 



SeXXy Graphics with SOUND! 

Our EXCLUSIVE !Se cclcr VGA graphics 
TALK and PLA Y MUSIC Itiwugh your slandarti speaker. 

SG10 ■ HLJGE cfist disk - eirtremftfy anpfy eidowed wornen TALK to yoj wtnie 

you admire ttieir HUGE piomrtiois * SiZZLINGI 

SG11 ■ Encounter d^ir - vn carl desuibe lite enplicn action you w^i see and 

HEAR ■ atisaiiwy IKREDISLE! 

SG12 ' Swimsort DIsIr - You will see the seines SMtnsoits wtMie ttie girls TALK lo 

yoj atiout tfieii lurnons anti tumolts. 

SG13 • Science Fiction Disk • You will see incredible space shots and alien 

eiKOjnters wttile ncaring oiher-worldty descfipticns and musc. 

Eldl llHl It oter 1.tM9 . plus FFUE DISK wah onr i.SMB ol sitllltlll tor printing. 

cataloging, conremng lo WINDOWS WALLPAPER, and chanoiilg tht pictures Biq 

VGAwlh51?K. 

Prices: One disk S19. ! disks $35, 3 disks J49, -1 disks tS9. 



SeXXy CD-ROM- 680MB with 5.2GS VGA pictures. S7 movros, 

6/.1 stories , games- Rrlce: $99 fSS9 with *iny CC disk) 

CD-ROM Bundle - 3 dlllorcnl XXX CD-ROMS S t99. 



ADD 53 S.H ■ 3 5' Ol FOnn IGN OriDi:nS A(]|) S2'I)ISK - IN F'A ADD TAX 

VISA/hlC Orders Only: 800-243- 1515 Ext. 600FT 

24 MRS 1 7 DAYS ■ OrCK'lJO 10: 

SeXXy Software. 2880 Bs'qey flo , Depi BOOFT. Halleld PA 19M0 
THE COMPETITION ISN'T EVEN CLOSEII 



Earn $4,000 Per Month 

From Your Home 

With A Computer! 




Circle Reader Service Number 116 



Si^ — 1— 111 

FREE CBS 386 SX Computer 

Quit spending money on your computer 
and let it earn money for you. This is a 
proven turn key business an individual or 
couple can run. If you purchase our soft- 
ware and business program, we will give 
you the computer and printer. If you 
already own a computer, you may receive a 
discount. You do not need to own, or 
know how to run, a computer — we will 
provide free, home office training. Financ- 
ing available. 

To receive free cassettes and cDlm litetature, 
call toll-fjee: 

1-800-343-8014, ext. 303 

(in Indiana: 317-758-4415) Or Write; 

Computer Business Services, Inc. 
CBC Plaia, Ste. 303, SKeridan, IN 46069 



PENTHOUSE MAGAZINE 

COMES ALIVE ON YOUR 
PC OR MAC! 

Try the New ONLINE SERVICE of PENTHOUSE MAGAZINE. 

It's incredible! You can finaliy use your computer for 

sometlning tinat you will truly enjoy. DOWNLOAD beautifui coior 

images of Penthiouse Pets and special guests from 

around tfie world. Receive revealing electronic mail from other 

members. Experience much more! We'll even provide 

the software to maximize your computer's graphic abilities! 

TO GET YOUR COPY OF OUR SOFTWARE, 
AND INFORMATION ON HOW TO ACCESS THE SYSTEM IN YOUR AREA, 

USE YOUR MODEM 
(set to 8-N-1 ) TO DIALi 

1-212-254-3838 

(PETLINE can be accessed from anywhere in North America 

and in 23 foreign countries. 1200/2400 baud, 

mouse support, graphics display requires 256-color VGA. 

MS-DOS and fvlAC available) 



THE COMPLETE 
PC SPORTS GUIDE 




PC Sports 



■>• , r^ 




i I 



Peter Scisco 




Keith Ferrell >K^''«- 



Collected here are in-depth re- 
views and strategies for over 60 
of the hottest PC sports games. 
Categories include golf, foot- 
ball, basketball, baseball, rac- 
ing, tennis, hockey, soccer, and 
several other sports. Includes dis- 
count offers on software and 
books. 

To order your copy send $14.95 plus 
$2.00 shipping or^d handling U.S. ($4 
Canada and $6 other) to COMPUTE 
Books, c/o CCC, 2500 McClellan Ave., 
Pennsouken, NJ 08109. (Residents of 
NC, NJ, and NY please odd appropriate 
soles tax.) 

All crderj must be paid in U.S. funds drawn on a U.S. 
bonk. Orders will be shipped via UPS Ground Service. 
Offer good while supplies losl. 



CLASSIFIEDS 



ACCESSORIES 



IBM SPECIALS 



..- - CONVERTIBLE 



ACCESSORIES & SERVICE 
for Both IBM MODELS 

- MEMORY EXPANSIONS 

- HARD DRIVES 

- PRINTER PORTS 

- SERIAL PORTS 

- SOFTWARE 

MANY MORE SPECIALTY ITEMS 

FREE CATALOG 

214-276-8072 



rCOMPUTEL , 

RESET I PO. Box 4B1782 
Dept - C 
Garland, TX 75046-1782 

FAXS BBS 214-272-7920 



BOOKS 



DISCOUNT COMPUTER BOOKS. Tliousands of 

titles available. PIea.se call or wiitc 

for your free catalog today. BOOKWARE, 

344 Watenown Rd., Thomaston, CT 06787 

(203) 283-6973 (800) 288-5662 

100 EASY WAYS TO MAKE BIG MONEY WITH 

your PC! Free Info. TWBC. Bon W74-C 

The Woodlands, TX 77387-6974 

COMPUTERIZE YOUR HOME TODAY! 

Hundreds of Home Automation products and 

systems, including Dynasty PC integrated 

software; controls everything from lights 

to VCR 's and heating systems. Free 52 

page catalog from Home Automation Laboratories, 

call 1-800-HOME-LAB! 



BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 



S975.00 DAILY POSSIBLE WITH A PC? YES! 
All from home! Safe, Easy, LOW COST! Free 
reponydetails! CNE-COMPUTE, 153 Princeton 
Ave. Dover, N.J. 07801 Hurry, limited offer! 



COMPOTE Classified Is a low-cost way to tell 
over 300,000 microcomputer owners about 
your product or service. 
Additional Information. Please read carefully. 

Rates: S38 per (ine, minimum ot four lines. Any or all of the 
first line set in capitai letters at no ctiaige. Add $15 per 
line for bdd face words, or $50 fm tue entire ad set in bold- 
face (any number of lines) 

Twins: Prepayment is required. We accept checks, mor^- 
ey orders, VISA, or MasterCard, 

Gerteral Information: Advertisers using post office txi:( nunv 
tier in their atis must supply permanent address and 
teEepbone number. Orders will not be acknowledged. Ad 
will appear in next available issue after receipt, 

CLASSIRED nSPUVY RitTES 

Class fieO display ads measure 27*" wide and are priced 
accoiding lo height. 1"= S275: I'fe'= S400, ?"= S525. 

HOW TO ORDER 

Call Mana Manaseri, Classified Manager, COMPUTE. 1 
iVbods Ct.. Huntington, NY 11743. at 516.757.9562 



126 COMPUTE JULY 1992 



CLASSIFIEDS 



CABLE TV 



(r 



-ft^a- 



PRIME TIME 

CABLE COMPANY 

CABLE TV DESCRAMBLERS 

Converters, Accessories • Lowest Prices 

^Call Far FREE Calalog: (800) 777-7731^ 



r^ 



CABLE TV CONVERTERS 

Why Pay A High Monthly Fee'' 
SaveSIOO'sA Year 



• All Jerrold, Oak, Hamlin, Zenitti, 
Scientific Atlanta, and more. 

• 30 Day Money Back Guarantee 

• Shipment wittiin 24 hours 

• Visa/MC and C.O.D. 

No Illinois Orders Accepted 

Puichagw agrees to comply wiin a!i slate and 

fedeial Iaw5 fegaidmg private ownetsliit^ oJ cabte 

TV equipment Conautl tocat capte operatoc 



L&L ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING 
1430 Miner Street, Suite 522 
Des Plaines, iL600l6 

Free Catalog 1 ■800-542-9425 
Inlormalion 1-708-54D-1106 



FREE CATALOG! 1-800-345-8927 
JERROLD HAMLIN OAK ETC. 

CABLE TV DESCRAMBLERS 



• Special Dealer Ptiitesi • Compare Our Lmv Retail Prices! 

■ Ortlers From Slock Shipped Immerjiately! 

• Guaranteed Warranltes & Prfces! • All Major Credit Cards 

PACIFIC CABLE CO., INC. 

73251(4 Reseda, Depl. 1 1 00 Resada, CA 91335 

For catalog, orders & informaiion 1-aQ0-345-89g7 



COMPUTER INSURANCE 



1^^^^ 3t3£3aE3E3E3SQSQBE3SQEE3aE3E3a 
H^i| Insures Your Computer g 

Big ^^ ^ ^,^ PR>\ides replacement of tiardware, media and ^ 
^™ ^^B^^ purchased software. Premiums start at S49 a S 
^ Jktii.'tlnii^-^Si^ sis. awwi theft, powr surges and accidenti M 

i Call 1-800-848-3469 a 

g SAf EWARE. The Insurance Agency Inc. g 

E3QE3QE3BE3at3aQQE3E3SE3EGESQESE3BS3SSa 



COMPUTER REPAIR 



AUTHORIZED COMPUTER REPAIRS: C64/!28, 
1541/1571, SX64, I28D & Amiga. Seiling DTK-comp 
computers. Quick service-30 day warranly 
MOM & POP's Computer Shop. 114 N. 16th, 
Bethany, MO 64424 (816)425^*400 



Closing date for August classifieds 

is May 15. 

Call/Fax your ad (516) 757-9562 



EDUCATION 



^-S. ^^]VX.S- 



• In^le^idegeepiDgianisiiiliileotnalHneitulit. 

• BS ctussiEtidsMSnOS, BASIC, PASCAL C. Data Ftf! 
fKKessii^ 3aia StnidiiES I Otieniing sfHens 

' MS cousa delude SfiMasEiignMrrg.Attfiaallnletge™ 

antJiTwJiiTOfe, 
For ItM ntomaiion cal 1 -800-767-2427 
Z101-CCM3gnoiaA»e.5.-Sua2M-Billiir^ail. Al 35205 




SOFTWARE 



BUY/SELL USED SOFTWARE! LOWEST PRICES! 
FREE LIST. Specify 64/128, Amiga or IBM. Ccntsiblc 
Software. PO Boi 930, Si. Joseph. Ml 49085. 
Phone: 616^128-9096 BBS: 616-429-7211 

IBM - COMMODORE 64 & 128 - AMIGA. 
lOOO's of PD/Shajieware programs on 100*s 
of disks. Free listing or S 1 for laige 
descriptive catalog (specify computer). 
DISKS O'PLENTY INC.. «362 Pines Blvd., 
Suite 270B, Pembroke Pines. FL 33024 

USED SOFTWARE— FREE BROCHURE, 

Specify Amiga or C()4/l 28. We also buy used software. 
Send list. Bare Bones Software, 940 4th Ave,, 
#222, Huntington. WV 25701 or I -800-638- 1 123. 

IBM-C64/128-APPLE PD & SHAREWARE - Free 
catalog or S2 for sample & catalog 
(refundable). Specify computer. CALOKE 
IND (B), Box 1S477. Raytov^n, MO 64133 

SU900, AMERICA'S #1 CHOICE FOR IBM & AMIGA 
SOFTWARE! CHOOSE FROM ADULTXX, BUSINESS. 
Et^TERTAINMENT, PROGRAMMING, & MUCH MORE 
900-933-0024 (2400) OR 900-933-0096 (HST- 
DUAL 9600) THE ONLY ASP APPROVED 900 BBS 
SI. 39 1ST MIN, 39 CENTS PER MINUTE AFTER! 

PROGRAMS (perKinal productivity, health or enterrain- 
ment) FOR IBM AND MAC WANTED! You get royalty 
income without incurring any expenses. Fax product 
description and phone number to 914-298-1785. 

BEST VALUE IN IBM/APPLE PD AND SHAREWARE 
Free catalog or S2.00 for cat & demo disk 
Specify computer, CHRISTELLA ENTERPRISE 
P,0, BOX 82205 ROCHESTER, MI 48307-9998 

PRINTED GENERAL CATALOG, 3200+ 
IBM PRGMS. ADULT DISK CATALOG 
SI.OO EA S/H. AGE 7 SIGNATURE 
REQ. FOR ADULT CATALOG. SUNSHINE 
SOFTWARE, 6492 SOUTH ST #470 
LAKEWOOD, CA 90713. ASP VENDOR 

DlAiNA: DIETARY ANALYSIS-A GODSEND FOR DIETERS 
and restricted diets. Adapts lo individual 
need.s, daily counter. limits. DOS 3.2 & above. 
$37.50-supported. Sun Software. 3365 Gulf 
Coast Dr. Spring Hill. Fl 34607 704-596-8758. 



ADULT COMPUTING NEWSLETTER 



TTie ti/tLite pi aiull efilettainment rjews aJtiJ reviews pt tpday's Itptlest adotl 
compulitiB ptKjjcts - HW oamK. mtivies. graphics and BBSs Featurw pn 
tite future pi adult cprnpuLlPQ, multimedia dig^ai video, CD ROM and mpre 
litUST STATE ASE 21 OR OLDER S3&V"r VISA I, MasterCard acixpied 

ADULT COMPUTING 

RO, Box 31S08.A7; San Francisco, CA 94131 
Ph. (415|«T-?401 Fj< (415) 647-743? 




SOFTWARE 



HAVE yOO WON THE LOTTEBY?" 
EW YOU CWN LOTTO PICKER" 
WELL, WHAT WO YOU EXPECT! 

' LOTTO PICKER is your ticket to the 
riches' LOTTO PICKER works by discovering 
the hidden biases in every lottery game world- 
iMde Using this inio to yaui advantage Lotto Picker 
will tell you exactly which riumbers lo play • no guess- work 
involved. Your Lotto Picker card will tie loaded wilh com- 
binations and number patterns most likely to be selected! 
Rays all Pick 3.4,6 7.10,11- Also plays games based on play- 
ing cards (MS-DOS only). FREE telephone support with 
eacii purchase For MS-DOS, Apple II, and C64/12B, 
NEW LWPniCE S29.95 (+54,55 s/h). NY add tax. 
S47BHCTKW GUARAHT££D OR YOUR HONEY BACK! 
ORDER TODAVI 1-80(MS4-1D62 s-COde 0644 or l-71S-317-19fi1 
GE BKKJE SERVICES, INC., rtT " rVI i 

648 Rensselaer Ave.. Depl. CP ■jp'^"'^ 

Staten Island, NY 10309 ^ 



"Mine Is The On/y Software 
With Documented 
Jackpot Winners, 

Look (or my ad in Product f^art. 

Call 800-826-GAIL 

A PROVEN WINNER 
SKflART LUCK SOFTWARE 




EMBROIDERED -'SOFTWEAR" T-SHIRT: $19.95. 
SPORTSHIRT; $29.95. Add S2.00 shipping. Your 
size? Address? Check. .MC, VISA. M P Hess / Cygnet 
Designs. 106 East Washington Street, Depl C, Elizabe- 
thtown, PA 17022. (717) 367-6140, $1.00 brochure. 

FREEt IBM PD & SHAREWARE DISK CATALOG 

Low prices since 1988! ASP Approved Vendor. 
Finto Software, Dcpt. M. Rt. 2. Box 44, Rosebud. TX 
76570orFAX (817) 583-2151. 

WE OFFER YOU MORE THAN JUST UP SERVICE! 

Discover why so many people are AMAZED 
with our unique selection system. You'll 
put $$$$$ in YOUR pocket tomorrow TOO if 
you order yours today. For IBM & Clones. 
Supports ALL Pick 3 & 4 Slate Lotteries! 
Only SI 9.95 + S3 S/H. OH res. add 6% tax. 
BL LIP Software Box 5044 Poland. OH 44514 

FREE IBM SHAREWARE CATALOG! 

Most popular programs low as SI per disk 

Bright Futures Inc. 

800-235-3475 



SUPPLIES 



LASER CARTRIDGE RECHARGE - $39.00 ■ 
Don't throw your la.ser printer cartridge SS 
away. We disa.ssemble, clean. rcHll, adjust. 
Evergreen Rcchargeablcs (800) 238-8719 



COMPUTER BATTERIES 

Nickel Cadmium, Lithium. Lead Acid £ Alkaline 
Batteries for PC. Boards, UPS, Prtnters & Lap- 
top Computers. Custom Build Battery Packs. 
MC/V 

EVS SUPPLY 

1350 Arapaho #126, Richardson, TX 750B1 
1 -800-776-5267 FAX 21 4-231 -2269 



JULY 1992 COMPUTE 127 



/ 



NEWS BITS 



Jill Champion 



Renting and raving, 

enviranmenlaily 

sensitive pacl<aglng, 

slopping tli8 

rays, and more. 



Hard Drives Be History? 

Irvine Sensors, developers of 
ultrahigh-density chip-packag- 
ing technology, recently en- 
tered into a contract with NA- 
SA to develop what would be 
in essence a solid-state re- 
placement for hard drives. Irv- 
ine's current technology 
stacks 80 layers of chips to 
create the highest-density 
memory, with the closest prox- 
imity between chips, for the 
greatest processing speed. 
Heat, which has been a prob- 
lem with chip-stacking technol- 
ogy in the past, is dissipated 
through a patented bonding 
process, and there's enough 
redundancy to keep the units 
functioning even if one or 
more of the chips fail. 

Irvine says this type of inno- 
vation could revolutionize the 
laptop/palmtop computer 
field. Laptops could be down- 
sized even more and made 
lighter, since the hard drive 
and bulky battery packs that 
now limit downsizing would 
be eliminated. The "solid- 
state" technology would signif- 
icantly extend the life of 
much smaller batteries, and 
computer functions could be 
greatly enhanced to include 
every function now performed 
by much larger systems. 

Software Rental 

Software rental by computer 
and video stores, although il- 
legal since passage of the 
Software Rental Act of 1990, 
is a growing trend, according 
to the March 1992 issue of 
AdWeek's Marketing Comput- 
ers. However, this trend, says 
the journal, is one the Soft- 
ware Publishers Association 
should be applauding rather 
than fighting. Instead of en- 
couraging software piracy, 
such stores are actually point- 
ing the way to a new type of 
software channel into which 
software makers could deliber- 
ately introduce second- 
string, for-rent software. 



Since software companies 
make so much of their money 
from upgrades, that strategy 
could continue, along with sell- 
ing 900-number support, man- 
uals, and training tapes. 

Beast on a Lease 

Along the same lines, leasing 
computer hardware is also a 
growing (but legal) trend in 
the business world, accord- 
ing to Computer Service & 
Rental Centers (484 Wright- 
wood Avenue, Elmhurst, Illi- 
nois 60126; 708-291-1616). 
Even the best-equipped busi- 
nesses have periodic short- 
term needs for supplemental 
PCs and peripherals; for in- 
stance, when a computer 
goes down, businesses may 
not be able to afford the down- 
time while it's being repaired. 
Renting or teasing is also a 
good option when companies 
need additional computers for 
training classes, peak work pe- 
riods, out-of-town trade 
shows, and othertemporary sit- 
uations. Cost efficiency, no 
maintenance, and access to 
the latest equipment are cited 
as the biggest advantages of 
renting over buying. 

Curtis Goes Green 

Curtis fVlanufacturing (30 Fitz- 
gerald Drive, Jaffrey, New 
Hampshire 03452; 603-532- 
4123), maker of computer-re- 
lated equipment, recently 
joined the growing list of envi- 
ronmentally conscious compa- 
nies with its new "minimalist 
packaging" for selected prod- 
uct lines. The new design 
cuts down on the amount of 
paper needed to produce 
packaging and "only uses 
what is required to bring the 
product safely to the consum- 
er," according to product liter- 
ature. Curtis's first products to 
use downsized packaging 
are economy-line printer legs 
and surge protectors. The 
company's planned new prod- 
uct lines will follow suit. 



Sunblock for Your PC 

Computer users concerned 
with the radiation emitted 
from computer terminals may 
want to try Alpha Block, a 
spray-on coating for comput- 
er screens that (the distribu- 
tors claim) filters "harmful 
rays" emitted by monitors. 
The product literature makes 
no specific claim that the prod- 
uct blocks electromagnetic 
radiation sometimes blamed 
for miscarriages and other 
health problems among 
heavy users of computers. 
Rather, it states that the prod- 
uct works on the screen the 
way sunblock works on your 
skin to filter the sun's rays, 
which means that it blocks ul- 
traviolet radiation. If you 
would like further information, 
contact Westwtnd Traders, 
RO. Box 433, Louisville, Col- 
orado 80027; (303) 937-9512. 

Top Early Childhood Software 

High/Scope Educational Re- 
search Foundation, a nonprof- 
it research and development 
organization based in Ypsilan- 
ti, f\/lichigan, bestowed its 
1992 Best Early Childhood 
Software award on four soft- 
ware products: Kid Works (Da- 
vidson & Associates), KidPix 
(Braderbund), The Playroom 
(Br0derbund), and The Tree- 
house (Broderbund). High/ 
Scope fecundation, which re- 
ceives no fees or monetary 
consideration from software 
publishers or distributors for 
software reviews, publishes 
an annual High/Scope Buy- 
er's Guide to Children's Soft- 
ware: Annual Survey of Com- 
puter Programs for Cfiildren 
Aged 3 to 7. Parents and ed- 
ucators who purchase High/ 
Scope's detailed Buyer's 
Guide will find more than 500 
reviev/s of children's software 
inside. The guide costs 
$19.95 from High/Scope 
Press, 600 North River Street, 
Ypsilanti, Michigan 48198- 
2898; (313) 485-0704. □ 



128 COMPUTE JULY 1992 



Unlimited connect time to access 

CompuServe basic services, 

now only $7,95 a month. 

You can start with the basics at a flat monthly rate, vsdth extended ser\ices 
available on a pay-as-you-go basis. 

For more information about CompuServe's nevy basic services, just mail 
this card, or call 1 800 848-8199, 



Name 

Address - 



City, State, Zip- 



Telephone ( _) GompuServe' 

Compute/July 



BUSINESS REPLY MAIL 

FIRST CLASS PERMIT NO. 407 COLUMBUS, OHIO 



POSTAGE WILL BE PAID BY ADDRESSEE 



CompuServe® 

ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 
PO BOX 20212 
COLUMBUS OH 43220-9988 



NO POSTAGE 

NECESSARY 

IF MAILED 

IN THE 

UNITED STATES 




l.l..l..ll...l.l..l.lll...l.l..l.lMl..l.l..l..f.l.l 




n 



IN i^l8 B.C., Hannibal needed more 
than 300 elephants to cross the Alps and 
confront the Romans, 



TODAY, a sin^e:mousej5 an3^u^^^-" ^ 
to explore the moW elaborate ci\3iization> 
in computer gaming — and confront the 
essence of evil- 



^w^^:->4,-'jg:hl 







■1 


f* 




Avoilable at a ratoiler neor you or 
call 1-800-999-4939 






u/7^U^ ^^'^^^^^ 



P.O. Box 161750 • Austin TX 78716 

m6m 



"Wki the new mouse interface, 
playing Ultima has never been 
easier. The left button controls 
your bands and the right button 
controls your feet-you never 
have to touch the keyboard" 

{Richard Garriott, 
Ultima VII designer) 



"...one of tie few games that 
emphasizes the moral develop- 
ment of your characters. . . the 
nature ofgaodandevUsettbe 
tone far this adventure in 
etbical dilemmas. " 
(MPC World, April/May 1992) 



nh:IBM&!Oa%,ai<t!|iq!ib!e 




"ne -world holds such beauty and complexity, 
with so many potential leads tofoJJev) and inter- 
esting places to poke into, that you'll hardly know 
•what to do first. Icouldn 't resist playing the 
tourist and faking a long look around. 
I'm still looking." 

(PC Games: The Complete PC Gamer's Guide, 
Spring/Summer 1992) 



VOLUNTARILY 
RATED MP-1 3 
(For Mature Players) 




mmssfSi^mKiwmsmmmi^mmm 



Circle Reader Service Number 192 /y 



An adventure game that will keep 
you 5n edge... 




v'iitrivm^^'ry: 



i 

! 


1 





\ K A/^W^i D A 



THE SEQUEL TO' ROBERTA WILLI AilS' 'TH€ COLONEL'S BEQUESr 





Laura Bow is back, tiapped 
in an imposing museum... 



...surrounded by socialites, 
mfscreants, tliieves... 



..and a cold-blooded killer! 



Can you finish this master-level Laura Bow MysfeiryBefore If finishes you? 



Circle fleader Service 
Number 154 




SIERRA' 



SUGGESTED PRICE: $69.95. TO ORDER, CALL 1-800-32&.6654